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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been readng my new logging book and it seems there were a lot of RR's that used wooden rails. I thought it was intresting and now its got me thinking. I have good spot on my layout were i plan on experimenting with this. Its going to be an out and back. Point A is going to start along the main line. Here the train can unload from the wooden spur to the main line. The engine is going to be batterie powered (obviously LOL)
I have a few batteried powered toys that might work. One I have in mind is from a thomas the engine set. It has a forward and reverse switch on the bottom. This will allow me to have it go back and forth on its own. All I need to do is have a something on the tack that hits the forward/reverse switch.
Has anyone experimented with this. I know its not the most practical but for a simple display i though it will look good especially on my backwoods line. I will post on my progress as I start preping for this project. Any ideas would be great.


 

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Snow,

I'm glad to be able to assit you for a change!

I have been messing around with wooden rails and 'strap-iron' for awhile, nothing down yet because I don't have benchwork up.

What you're looking at is more commonly called a 'pole road'. Speeds were very slow, poles weren't usually attached to any ties or the like--as you can see, it sorta set its gauge as it went. Switching seemed to consist of picking up a couple of poles and moving them to meet with the next set in the branch.

There's a good deal of info on Google, but you have to look. From what I gather, these roads were popular in the deep South up through WW1 or a little later. Check out the knee pants on the kid. Note the black guy in the dirty overalls. Most of the pixes I've studied (though not with a spyglass) in the western regions don't show blacks. They about had to be there, though.

A good number of these pole road engines were chain or gear driven, as shown, though siderod locos were around, too. Don't know if you want to go through all the trouble to mock up a chain drive, but it'd look cool on one of the 'toy' engines and add realism. All you'd need would be a wood lathe to make some decent-looking concave wheels. Might even get by with a drill press.

Hope this helps.

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Les, Looking at the pictures from the logging RR of the Blue ridge and Smokey mounatins they used ties on these railroads with square rails. The engines were the same that were used on the metal rails. Based off what I read it sounds like they just changed the wheels on the engine and cars. I will post my progress and let me know how you make out
 

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Right on, they just changed the wheels. Some locos were offered with choice of wheels--including 'road wheels' like a steam traction engine.

I hope you'll keep us posted, 'cause you tend to get things done--or make 'em happen, depending on your take.

Les
 

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Use bumpers at either end and route a push pole under the chasis attached to the switch. could be the link and pin coupler or closed knuckles.... ona stick! lol...
 

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Posted By monsterhunter on 03/11/2009 10:04 AM
How did they make curves?
Dan




One "joint" or section at a time. OR rather one set of logs at a time. Think in terms of taking several straight sections of track cutting the ends of one rail slightly shorter and then connecting them. You make a curve using several straight sections that angle a little.

Chas
 

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So were there arborists who specialized in growing curved trees to different radii?
A bit like, but not as extreme as, the ends of walking sticks, or the other ends of hockey sticks, both ice and field sorts!
 

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Posted By Westcott on 03/11/2009 12:24 PM
So were there arborists who specialized in growing curved trees to different radii?
A bit like, but not as extreme as, the ends of walking sticks, or the other ends of hockey sticks, both ice and field sorts!



Nope pole roads were quick and easy roads, no time to wait for a tree to grow. Whereas saplings were readily available. Slow and ponderous they carried heavier weights as the poles distributed the load.
 

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We had squared wooden rails on sleepers in Australia, horse or bullock teams were used most of the time.





Heres a wooden bridge for your wooden rails.





Andrew
 
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