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Discussion Starter #1
I came into the G1 hobby back when a_______ wicks were in use. Then the a_____ wick material became unavailable for a good reason. I am aware that many have been using SS mesh rolled into a wick. I just bought some refractory rope wick material on eBay.

Anyone used this stuff???

Looks way better than the fibre glass wick material that didn't work so well.


Jack
 

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I have "TRIED" a couple of different rope wicks. Not sure what they would be called for sure, but one was much too dense to soak up the alcohol and produced a very small flame. The other was kind of "waxy" feeling and did not soak up the alcohol at all.
 

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I think I bought the same material on eBay. Came from "razors-kid". Haven't tried it yet. Will be trying in my "Grasshopper". Alex
 

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Alex,

Thats the wick I bought. Jut looking at it, it looks much like the "a" stuff. I'm also looking for refractory paper for boiler lagging.

Those Aster grasshoppers are interesting locos. Aster models are beyond my ability to afford but they are very nice indeed! It would be nice if there were plans available for them.

Jack
 

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McMaster-Carr sells woven ceramic and various non-asbestos insulating materials suitable for our use. I bought the .050x2" woven ceramic material, and it was easy to work with. They have an on-line catalog, and delivery is fast.

Larry
 

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I always have good results with ordinary string type candle wick. You can pack them in as tight or loose as you need. Trim to length. Shape them. It's real cheap. I used fiber glass too, it works fine, but the ends crust up and require frequent cleaning. Never have that with candle wick. Only disadvantage to candle wick is if the fuel runs out, they will burn dry and are gone.

Alcohol is a great fuel.

Take Care, Bob
 

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Jack,

Currently I use 1/8" thick sheet ceramic insulating material cut into strips about the size of a paper match. The actual thickness of the material is about 1/16". Bought it from Sulphur Springs several years ago to use as boiler insulation. It works well buts it's fragile, especially when wet with alcohol, because it is a mat of very short strands and not woven long strands.

Also have used rolled-up fibreglass reinforcing tape, but as Bob reported, it gets crusted up after a while. In a pot-boilered loco with a fuel system modeled after an alcohol lamp I used strips of cotton t-shirt. Works great but don't let the fuel run out, just as Bob reported for the candle wick string.

Steve
 

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Options:

1. Standard Aster wicks that you can buy from Hans. Work really well and you can extend their life by buying a small CO2 extinguisher to ensure that they are out when you have finished running. An altenative to the Aster wicks is http://www.rhhfranks.co.uk/sm32%20website/frameset-1.htm

2. Stainless mesh - http://www.southernsteamtrains.com/misc/stainlesswirewicks.htm

3. Ceramic fire bricks - OK but hard to light

I've tried all of the above and concluded that the Aster wicks work fine - they can be fine tuned by adjusting the packing, trimming the length or fairing the ends. Stainless and ceramic fire bricks seem elegant but I'm not entirely convinced - they can be hard to light and are not easy to adjust.

Robert
 

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I have had good results from a ceramic fibre 3 lay rope ,sold by insulation companies for sealing kiln doors etc..it is in fact Aluminium Oxide fibre and can be thinned out to fit the burner cups easily. good hot fires and burning down at the end of the run doesnt hurt it.

Gordon.
 

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I use the "ULTIMATE WICK" too. That, with CO2 to put them out works great and lasts a long time. I think that the main trick is to not let your wicks smolder out. That causes them to get crusty and and overly burnt. In my experience, the "ULTIMATE WICK" material can take a lot more heat.
 
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