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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The side walls need to be cut, as do the window openings, and doors. The roof needs to measured and cut, then "skinned" with Precision plastic shingles. And that all-important front store window with the large panes? Right, needs to be built. So what does the contractor, tanned and unfit from his Hawaiian vacation do? Reconstruct the roof trim.

The deal is, after I finished the back wall of my store and did a much better, neater job, I decided the front wall roof trim looked crappy. So I got out my trusty needlenose pliers and broke off all the little plastic trim pieces. The I refabricated new ones and painstakingly MEK-ed them in place. Much better. Is that anal or what? Now straighten that tie, fix that collar and don't slouch! :)
 

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Hi Joe,

Sounds like you had a good vacation and I suspect that you are possibly  suffering from Jet Lag!

Of course you will finish the 'Riders Store' its big, you found that you needed that vacation (did some bits on the building wrong  ( muttered curses when found!)), and are now thinking, which will coalesce to action when the jet lag has gone/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/doze.gif, you will think of ways to cure the (perceived) mistakes.

Its a monster but you knew that!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sad.gif  I am sure that the final result will both be to your satisfaction (& you will have accomodated any glitches) and to ours.

We look forward to more photos, general views are better, both to minimize foul-ups and to show off the rest of your handiwork:)

Get over the jet lag, have a coffee or three, mutter again, and by then your brain, now back in gear will have sorted things out for you - all you have to do is get on with what it has sorted out/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/ermm.gif


Happy building they are always massive things, but when they are finished and out in the garden some devil goes and shrinks them!
 

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Some people can vision the finished product in their head before starting. They can whip together something in a week and it looks great. Lucky them!
 
I scribble and draw for a week, and sometimes wake up in the middle of the night with an idea. Then I start, carefully fussing over each piece. It takes me weeks to build something. Than as soon as it’s done, I realize I could of done it easier and better some other way. AARGH!
 
I am constantly re-doing finished projects. My socket for custom installations of the 75 MHz receiver is a good example. Every winter I would build a revised version to incorporate a new idea or component. I think the Super Socket is revision twelve.
 

 
No wonder my project list just keeps growing and growing. But I guess that’s why they call it a hobby.
 

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Joe,

You are certainly doing beautiful work! I'm not knocking perfection even if I lack the ability to achieve it but don't get too wrapped up in over doing it or you can work on a project forever. Real buildings aren't perfect. Just ask anyone doing interior or finish work on a new building.

You will undoubtedly see imperfections in your own work that the rest of us will never notice. Set a standard you can live with and change the things that really bug you. If the structure is to be placed outdoors especially, any perfections will soon become imperfect anyway. hehe!

Your work really looks great and you don't need to make excuses to anyone. I know I'd be proud to have a "Rusz-built" structure on the POC! I'm looking forward to seeing this building completed so... Hurry up and get the dang thing done! /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/w00t.gif;):)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the inspiration, kind words, etc.  I was thinking of you guys, who actually complete projects and do such nice work. I tend to be of the "Unfinished Symphony" school. My wife accuses me of being a procastinator, which I am. But I am also a perfectionist and the fear of not getting it right keeps me from even starting a project. Like building an outdoor railroad. I have a track plan of sorts, but I stand out in the yard and think, "Will that track fit in there? Can I loop this line over that one?" As a result, we have a dandy flowerbed, but not one foot of track, which I have stashed in the garage.

About the Rider's store: I was all set to start making the front show windows and the double door, planning on gluing the styrene strips of various sizes onto the clear base material (Makrolon). Then while procrastinating, er, planning, I read Jack Verducci's article in GR about using Killer Red double-backed adhesive tape, and began to ponder using that instead of glue. See what I mean?!

Richard, a question: since you tend to stick windows such as Grandt Line onto your clear acrylic structures,  what do you do about making the windows, doors, etc,  fit flush with the surface? The front of my Rider's store has two Grandt Line windows on the upper story, and while I ground the backs down to almost nothing (trying to avoid damaging the mullions) the windows still protrude too much from the surface, even with a layer of Precision Plastic clapboard beneath them. By using clear material, I had hoped to avoid having to cut window openings and such, but now I don't know...

Whadda ya think?

Oh, and are you going to the Narrow Gauge Convention in Portland in September?
 

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Joe,

I simply cut the cedar siding boards to a thickness that accomodates the windows. Once on the building it's almost impossible to tell their thickness. No need for scale boards when your framing beneath is solid acrylic! If a particular window sits too proud of the surface just stick a piece of acrylic in it on top of the acrylic wall. As long as the window area is clear I defy you to be able to see how thick it is from the outside. Precision plastic siding might need plastic strapping behind to push the siding out a bit. Make the strapping as wide as possible for good adhesion to the siding especially on the edges, around windows & doors and behind expansive surfaces. No need for scale size behind it where it won't ever be seen anyway. Even odd scrap pieces can be used as long as the over all support is there and moisture is sealed out.

I know this will be hard for a perfectionist to accept ;) but unless you're making a contest model the main goal is a good solid model that'll hold up with minimum maintenance outdoors and still look good. Also I suggest keeping interiors to a minimum, only in highly vivible portions of a building. I learned this the hard way after spending considerable hours of work to include interior detail in early attempts that no one ever sees in daylight and very little of at night.

I may take in the Convention in Portland if things work out. Not sure yet.
 

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Posted By Richard Smith on 02/26/2008 1:05 PM
Joe, 

I'm looking forward to seeing this building completed so... Hurry up and get the dang thing done! /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/w00t.gif;):)

Richard, you sound like Doug (Dougald). In his words he is “results oriented”. I drive him crazy sweating the details. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif
 
Joe, I was also perfectionist and seldom finished anything I started. One day my older brother heard me fussing over a model because it wasn’t perfect. He showed me the edge of a sheet of paper and asked if it looked perfect to me. I answered yes. He then brought his microscope in and had me look at it again. The edge of the paper looked as ragged as a lawn. Nothing is ever perfect he told me. From that day forward I was happy to do a good job, even if it wasn’t perfect. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Richard for the tip, and Paul for the reality check anecdote. I will sleep better tonight. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Richard, I am thinking about it. We will be in town in September so my dance card is open. Plus I know several people in Portland, if I needed to bunk in (I won't). Mostly, I would love to see, up close and personal,  some of the stuff  that appears in the Gazette and Finescale. And to chat with the "artists." Thinking off the top of my head (ouch!), I'll look into airfare and kinda bounce the idea off the CEO (my wife). Why, have I made you think about going? Also, how far is Port Orford from Portland? Maybe I could see your pike? Or your salmon. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/tongue.gif

I was just thinking...there are a few really nice large scale garden railways in the Portland area (we visited them when the Garden Railway Convention was in Seattle a few years ago) and maybe one could revisit some of 'em. I recall one (I have photos) that was in a really snazzy area and in a back yard that had a tennis court and stuff. He was building like crazy and by now that should be one huge layout. Very nicely done, too. I'll dig out the program and see if I can find it.

Anyway, some random thoughts...
 

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Joe,

Just thinking about it. We've got some company expected about August but the dates aren't firm so I don't really know what's going on or if I'll have the time open during the convention or not.

"Maybe I could see your pike? Or your salmon." Something fishy about that query! ;)

It's about 5-1/2 hours drive to Portland from here. We're on Hwy 101 on the southern Oregon coast a tad over 50 miles south of Coos Bay. You would be most welcome to drop by anytime but 5-1/2 hours drive (11 hours round trip) would probably be too much for just a side trip from the convention.

A better way if you have the time would be to take your wife on a scenic coastal trip up Hwy 1 in California and onto 101 at Leggett and up the coast into Oregon. Nice trip with plenty to see most of the way including Mendicino and Ft. Bragg areas as well as along the Oregon coast including the POC and lunch at the Crazy Norwegian and Seal Caves, etc., farther up before swinging east to Portland.

Also I will be attending the West Side Modeler's Convention in Sonora on April 19. I have an annual get together there every year with some "old cronies". We've been doing this every year since the second or third meet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Richard, hmm, West Side Modelers. You mentioned that before. Tell me more. For that event, I might just scam a test car from my now part-time employer (Road & Track) and drive up, since that's doable in a few hours from LA. Wouldn't cost hardly nothin.' But is the meet just about logging railroads and stuff? I like logging (we went to Cass two summers ago), but honestly, it's not my thing. Not to say it wouldn't be fun just to swap lies with the likes of you.
 

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Joe,

I'm much too honest to fib but I can exchange a few wild tales with you. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/tongue2.gif

The West Side meet is predominately a logging venue and is multiscale. It's a small, folksy one day event that I find to be a lot of fun. There are usually a couple of clinics and/or slide shows, a model contest and multiple door prizes, some quite nice. A small number of vendors and manufacturers attend but no biggies like Bachmann or Aristo, etc. Clint Nestell always has some great books for sale both new and old.

It's held in Sonora at the Elks Club. Below is a link to the West Side website.

www.westsidereunion.com/

NOTE: The link is for last years, 2007, meet. For some reason they are very slow about updating their info and probably won't have the 2008 info up for some time yet. The rest of the info is accurate though pertaining to location.

This years meet will be on Saturday, April 19, 2008 at the Elk's Lodge. Just about anyone in town can direct you there but if you arrive early we could maybe meet and have a quick breakfast in town and then you could follow me there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Richard, I'm thinking....

Spent late afternoon and most of the evening until 10 p.m. working on the store facade. After all that fuss about gluing the windows onto the Marklon, I decided to cut out the door and window openings (five!), applying the technique someone posted on MLS. That is: scribe around all the openings, then make a big diagonal X from corner to corner. Drill a hole in the center of the X, insert saw blade (used ny scroll saw), cut on the X lines, then snap the four triangles. I tried cutting the actual opening with my saw, but the result looked like a drunk trying to toe the line during a sobriety check. :D So scribe and snap it is.

I am working on the lean-to upstairs loading door, which has diagonal planking. I cut the planks out from Evergreen siding sheet. The main reason I decided to cut out all the openings is that I noticed the aforementioned door is recessed somewhat from the surface, and merely trying to fake a door by gluing strip onto the Marklon would have looked dorky. It's lotsa work, but hey, you know me.

I still plan to glue strip styrene onto the Marklon to make the display windows and double doors. I ain't that anal!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif
 
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joe rusz,

don't forget, it is a hobby! when a certain project steps on your nerves, put it away for another time, when it might not.
i got dozens of projects running (or waiting) paralell to each other.

korm
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Korm, I'm there pal. I got several projects waiting to be completed--an upscaling (to 1:20.3 from 1:22.5) of my Bachmann 10-wheeler (now a Barry-ized Connie), the Orbisonia, PA firehouse (needs mortar, windows, interior, roof), Styrene station (wiring, roof holddown screw, signage and maybe roof supports), Pacific Coast Railway sidedoor caboose (got the flatcar which will serve as the base, and a cardboard cutout of the side to give me an idea of what she might look like), an original wood boxcar kit (Vance Bass?), half done, with trucks.

Is that enough parallel projects? :)

That said, I worked like a dog for the last two days, trying to get as much of Rider's store finished before I have to clean off the dining room table for Saturday's big birthday dinner (mine). My wife has been a sport about it, considering that I have taken up the kitchen, dining room and part of the living room, scattering styrene, hand tools, plastic sheet, and dozens of photos of the prototype. Anyway, she's a comin' along.
 
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Is that enough parallel projects?

...hmmmm..... le'mme think... sounds like a good start at multitasking.

a hurray for understanding wives (got one too)

and happy birthday!

korm
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Joe,
I'm the same way, I gotta have at least 5 projects going or I can't focus. My wife says I have some sort of strange form of ADS, but it works for me. People think that I get a lot done in a short period of time, when in reality I have a lot going on, over a longer period of time. So, when several projects are completed around the same time as one, I may have taken several months or years to complete what seems like a lot of work in a short period of time!
And like you, I sometimes have to rush to make some space to start a new projects. My work shop and craft rooms are in a continual state of clutter.
To date I have the following at varying stages of completion.
1. Ruby bash to Kauila
2. Manoa station
3. Connie bash
4. Queen Liliuokalani
5. Claus Sprekels
6. Coach 64
And still in planning stages
1. Brass version of Lanakila
2. Connie bash for Reciprocity
3. My outdoor layout
4. Cases for my models.
Bottom line, it gets done when it gets done ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Robert, Richard, et all, here's another reason nothing gets done--the pillar project. My wife said a simple piece of 2 x 2 would suffice for a porch pillar, but no-ooo. Joe has to copy the original (see photo), which has these scalloped tops and bevelled edges. I thought long and hard about how to bevel the post and finally decided I would get two pieces of brass, temporarily afixe each to opposite sides of the plastic post, then use them as guides as I sanded/filed off the edges. I haven't done ti yet, but I think it'll work. Kinda anal, but it's gonna look great. :D
 

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