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Who does what on a passenger train?
These questions are mostly for:
1920 to 1950 era questions.
For a first class line like the Southern Crescent or Daylight.
For my heavyweights, what are the job titles, and briefly, what do they do? I need a complete crew.
What does a porter do? Is the porter the one who stands by the door when you board and puts that little box on the platform for you to step on. Does he help you up the steps?
Would there be more than one conductor?
What is the job position of the man who punches your ticket?
Who turns down the sheets in the sleeper compartments?
Who checks the Lavatories?
Are there Waiters and head waiters? Does someone seat you in the dinner.
What is the title of the guy who stores you bags in the baggage car. Is he part of the crew, or someone who works at the station.
Who cooks the meals? does he have assistants.
Are there maids to make your bed up?
Are there brakemen, like on a freight train?
If you wanted a complete crew, how many people would that be, and what are their titles?
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Edit - Why does this forum mash everything into one paragraph in preview? Edit again.. Then remove the extra lines when I edit?
 

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Bob

I'll start the process off

What does a porter do? Is the porter the one who stands by the door when you board and puts that little box on the platform for you to step on. Does he help you up the steps?

A porter (in Canada) was an employee of the railroad who was a sleeping car attendant ... in the USA a similar person would have been employed by Pullman. His duties were to take care of a single sleeping car and deal with the passengers on in. He would help passengers on and off that car.

Would there be more than one conductor?
Normally a train has only one conductor though on larger trains he may have an assistant. In Canada, these assistants were called Trainmen.

What is the job position of the man who punches your ticket?
Usually the conductor or a Trainman would do this.

Who turns down the sheets in the sleeper compartments?
the sleeping car porter for that car.

Who checks the Lavatories?


Are there Waiters and head waiters? Does someone seat you in the dinner.
In the diner, there are a number of positions. The Head of the crew usually acts as the Maitre d' ... there are waiters and there is a head chef plus assistant chefs. A typical dining car that seated 48 would have a crew of 9 ... a Maitre d' ... a head chef, 3 assistant chefs, a busboy and 3 waiters

What is the title of the guy who stores you bags in the baggage car. Is he part of the crew, or someone who works at the station.
Checked luggage is handled by the station agent who may be assisted by a trainman

Who cooks the meals? does he have assistants.
see above re dining cars

Are there maids to make your bed up?
This is the task of a sleeping car Porter

Are there brakemen, like on a freight train?
Yes and they have the same duties.

If you wanted a complete crew, how many people would that be, and what are their titles?
Depending on the size of train ... the operating crew consisted of an engineer, fireman, headend brakean, tailend brakeman (usually done by a trainman) and a conductor plus trainmen assistants.

Each sleeping car had a porter.

Each car with a buffet had a steward and those buffet cars with sleeping accomodation also had a porter.

Each parlour car had a steward.

Each full diner had a crew of 9 and dining cars that were smaller with other functional areas had a scaled back crew

First class trains often carried special cars and may have had a train secretary, a barber, a masseuse and so on.

If the train carried an RPO, there would be several employees of the Post Office.

Regards ... Doug
 

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Originally, the Conductor "conducted" passengers on and off the train and between cars when the train was in motion (between the coach, diner, and sleeper cars, etc.)

The Conductor is in charge of the "train" as a whole. Originally, the locomotive Engineer was in charge (it was his engine, his design and build) and thus he was in charge of the train. But on one line (I don't remember right now which RR is was) the Engineer and the Conductor had a disagreement over when to move the train. The argument was settled by fisticuffs on the ground beside the locomotive and the Conductor won. The Engineer is still in charge of the "Locomotive" but the Conductor is in charge of the "Train" that the locomotive is pulling and the Conductor tells the Engineer when and in what direction to move the train.
 

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can an Englishman answer any of these questions or is it only for our big bruvvers and cousins after all I do model ATSF and UP and SP basing my pike around Bairstow and Stockton incidentley I used to sometimes work on the railway around Stockton (Co Durham) on the shunting pilots and passenger turns.
Jim Brodie
 

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The person in charge of the Diner is generally titled "Steward" as far as I know.

Amtrak calls their Trainmen "Assistant Conductors" or AC's.... but historically, the title was Trainman on many railroads.

Here are some rule book things that may help you (New Haven RR 195?) It's long .... now would be a good time to top up that coffee:

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TRAIN DISPATCHERS.

760. Train dispatchers report to and receive their instructions from the superintendent or chief train dispatcher or from such officer as may be designated. They will issue train orders for the movement of trains in the name of the superintendent, transmitting and recording train orders as prescribed by the rules in accordance with the rules for movement by train order.
761. Train dispatchers must report immediately to the chief train dispatcher any irregularity relating to the movement of trains or the handling and execution of train orders.
762. They should bear in mind that many matters clear to them may not be fully understood by operators, conductors, enginemen and others, and give instructions in such a manner that they will not be misunderstood. Being perhaps more familiar with existing conditions than some others, it is the dispatchers' duty to take the initiative so far as lies within their power; see that trains are moved safely, anticipating dangerous conditions, and avoid issuing messages or unsafe combinations of train orders that might cause an accident, due to confusion or misunderstanding.
They will make the various records required and observe special instructions.
763. They must familiarize themselves with conditions existing on territory handled by making frequent trips over it. When issuing restricting orders, the conditions of the surroundings, such as weather, grade and view, must be taken into consideration.
764. They must require operators to report trains promptly.
765. Before giving an extra train its orders, they will enter it on the train sheet, and carefully examine such sheet for opposing extra trains and work extras. When practicable, they will run extra trains to their known destination; avoiding, for temporary convenience, short running orders.
766. They must not extend the limits or time of a work extra, but must annul its former order and issue another, as may be necessary under later conditions.
767. Before being relieved, they must write, in ink, in the train order book, a transfer of all orders not executed. They must see that such orders and all information pertaining thereto are understood by the relieving dispatcher, who must acquaint himself with instructions, the position of trains and contents of the train order book, and acknowledge same by signing his name in the train order book.

YARDMASTERS.

770. Yardmasters, unless otherwise directed, report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative. Within assigned districts and as directed they have charge of yards, of employes, movement of trains and engines and distribution and movement of cars therein, unless otherwise provided. Trick yardmasters are governed by these same instructions.
They must be familiar with instructions relative to handling of explosives, refrigeration, ventilation, live stock, and of perishable and other freight.
They must have on file and be familiar with General Car Order and Home Route Instructions, special car orders and instructions issued by General Superintendent of Transportation pertaining to the handling or movement of freight equipment. They will be responsible for compliance of instructions.

STATION MASTERS.

776. Station masters report to and receive their instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They have charge of the passenger station where located and, unless otherwise provided, of the persons employed therein.
776. They must see that the station and various apartments are kept in proper and sanitary condition; preserve order in and about the station and around sleeping cars; attend courteously to the comfort and wants of passengers; that passengers are directed to the proper trains and that proper information regarding time of arrival and departure of trains is shown upon bulletin boards provided for the purpose. At stations equipped with intertrack fences they will be responsible for keeping the gates of these fences closed and locked or properly protected when not in use, when under their jurisdiction. Assistant station masters in the districts assigned them are governed by these same instructions.

GENERAL RULES FOR CONDUCTORS.

780. Conductors report to and receive their instructions from the superintendent or his representative and will obey the instructions of train and crew dispatchers, station masters, station agents, and yardmasters in their respective jurisdiction, and conform to the instructions issued by the heads of other departments.
Conductors will have general charge of trains to which they are assigned, and all persons employed thereon.
781. Conductors will be responsible for the movement, safety and proper care of their respective trains in strict accordance with the rules, special instructions and train orders, and for the faithful and prompt performance of duties by the trainmen.
782. Conductors must see that their trains are provided with proper tools and equipment at all times; know that the cars in their trains have been inspected, and that the brakes are in proper working order and that the prescribed signals are displayed.
Conductors must not start their trains from inspection points until the inspectors have given notice that their work is finished. Conductors are responsible for making the required tests when car inspectors are not available.
783. Conductors must see that their trainmen remain with and protect their trains at terminals until cars are clear of the main track or taken in charge by the relieving train crew or yardmen. Markers must not be removed until cars are placed on storage tracks or taken in charge by the relieving train crew or yardmen.
784. When repairs are made to foreign cars, a report on prescribed form must be made.
786. They must be familiar with and have copy of General Car Order and Home Route Instructions, and instructions issued by General Superintendent of Transportation pertaining to the movement or handling of freight equipment and see that they are complied with.

PASSENGER CONDUCTORS.

790. Passenger conductors must not permit intoxicated or disorderly persons to get on their trains, nor persons mentally incompetent unless accompanied by an attendant. They must not permit obscene or profane language, nor interference or annoyance of other passengers or other misconduct.
Blind persons without escort or guide, who establish their ability to travel alone, may purchase tickets and will be given such assistance by train employes as may be necessary to their safety in getting on or off trains.
Conductors must pass through their trains at frequent intervals to attend to the wants of passengers and to see that trainmen properly perform their duties.
792. If necessary to protect passengers from any person who is noisy, disorderly, intoxicated or otherwise offensive, a conductor must be careful to use no more force than is absolutely necessary. He must maintain a dignified self-control, and if the comfort and safety of passengers require, remove the offending person to the baggage car or other suitable place of detention, understanding that this does not constitute an arrest, and that the person may be allowed to depart from the train or may be arrested by a railroad or regular police officer.
He must eject only at a station where an agent or police officer is on duty, and where the ejected person will not be exposed to inclement weather.
A conductor must never eject a child of tender years or a person in a feeble or helpless condition. The names of witnesses having information regarding incidents subject to this rule should be obtained and sent to the superintendent with a special report giving all particulars.
793. Passenger conductors must keep themselves thoroughly posted as to connections and the time of connecting roads, and have in their possession when on duty a copy of the latest public folder and be prepared to inform passengers as to routes, connections and through coach, parlor and sleeping car arrangements.
794. When examining tickets passenger conductors must notify passengers destined to points on branch or connecting lines where to change cars. When late they must wire agents at junctions the number of passengers for connecting roads and divisions.
795. At terminal stations, passenger conductors must report to the car inspector or repairer any defects of the cars in their trains, and any imperfect action of the air brakes or other appliances noticed during the trip. They must also notify the inspectors or repairers at intermediate stations of such defects or imperfect action, and if necessary give them an opportunity to repair.
796. Passenger conductors must know that at all times a trainman is in position in the train with flagmen's signals ready for use, that he goes back to the rear promptly when safety or the rules require it, and that the next trainman takes his place on the train promptly.
797. Passenger conductor's duties are of the most delicate and responsible character, and require unusual tact and courtesy. The safety of their trains and passengers and the reputation of the railroad are dependent upon their discretion and care.

TICKET COLLECTORS,
TRAIN BAGGAGEMEN,
PASSENGER TRAINMEN,
FREIGHT TRAINMEN AND
YARD BRAKEMEN.

800. Ticket collectors, train baggagemen, passenger trainmen, freight trainmen and yard brakemen report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They must obey the instructions of the conductor; also those of train and crew dispatchers, station masters, station agents and yardmasters within their respective jurisdictions.
Ticket collectors will assist the conductor in the collection of transportation and comply with Rules 793 and 794 and when necessary must perform duties of trainmen.
801. Train baggagemen must receive, take care of and correctly deliver baggage, mail, express, etc., placed in their charge. They must carry a supply of necessary reports, exercise care to make them out properly and forward them promptly at the end of the run.
802. Train baggagemen must give proper attention to the custody and delivery of United States and train mail, reporting any irregularities promptly to the train dispatcher. When mail is delivered from moving trains it must be thrown off at designated places.
Before putting off any packages from moving trains they will be sure that such packages will clear the train, and that there are no persons or objects in the way that might be struck.
803. Train baggagemen must remain in the baggage car during the entire trip, except when duties require them elsewhere, and will not leave car at the end of trip until all baggage and other matter is properly disposed of or transferred to relieving train baggageman.
If necessary to leave the baggage car temporarily they must close and lock all doors or know that it is properly protected.
804. Train baggagemen must, when necessary, perform the duties of passenger trainmen. They must not allow passengers to ride in the baggage car unless authorized.
805. Train baggagemen must not accept anything for transportation, except company business.
806. Passenger trainmen must keep car seats turned, facing them toward the head of the train, except when proper to allow passengers the use of double seats.
807. Passenger trainmen must lock the doors of toilets in coaches when approaching or standing at important stations or terminals. They must promptly unlock them after leaving such points.
Proper judgment must be used in cases of emergency.
808. When cars are left at points where no provisions are made for their care, they must see that windows are closed, doors locked and heating, lighting, ventilating and air conditioning apparatus is properly cared for.
809. Passenger trainmen must see that proper heating, ventilation, air conditioning and illumination are provided in each occupied coach as con- ditions warrant.
Passenger trainmen must frequently pass through the cars to see if any services are required for the comfort and safety of passengers.
When practicable, necessary assistance must be extended to passengers boarding and alighting from trains, particularly women with small children or hand baggage, elderly or invalid persons.
810. Trainmen and yard brakemen are responsible for the display of train signals as required, the handling of switches, the coupling or uncoupling of cars and engines when necessary or so instructed, the manipulation of brakes, and for assisting the conductor or engineman in all requisites for the prompt and safe movement of their train or engine.

FREIGHT AND YARD CONDUCTORS.

825. Conductors must have the proper authority for movement of each car in the train.
826. Conductors must not handle a car which is found to be overloaded or improperly loaded or not in condition to run safely and report cars in such condition to the train dispatcher promptly.
827. Conductors must, when bad order cars are set out of the train, report the fact to the train dispatcher promptly, advising nature of defect, where waybill or manifest was left and note on waybill or manifest the point at which car was left.
828. Conductors must carefully check with the waybills (in conjunction with station agents if possible) all freight loaded and unloaded, and make a record of freight over, short or in bad order.
When necessary to transfer freight from one car to another they must record the transfer and number and initials of the car to which it is transferred on face of waybill.
829. Yard conductors must know that proper routes are lined up and proper protection of all movements is provided to avoid any damage, or injuries. Both road and yard conductors are responsible when handling derricks as per Rule S-106 to know that the derrick is properly secured before moving and before permitting trains on adjacent tracks to pass so as to avoid the derrick swinging and sideswiping other passing trains.

SWITCH TENDERS AND SWITCHMEN.

830. Switch tenders and switchmen report to and receive instructions from the trainmaster or his representative. They must obey the instructions of station masters, yardmasters, crew dispatchers and train dispatchers within their jurisdiction. It is their duty to operate the switches as instructed for trains and engines using them; to know the switches are properly lined, locked or hooks in place and in good condition and clear of snow or other obstructions, and promptly report defects.
831. A switch tender or switchman to be relieved by another must not leave his post until relieved, and the one going off duty must inform the one coming on, of trains due which have not passed and any other information necessary for his guidance.

ROAD FOREMEN OF ENGINES.

832. Road foremen of engines will conduct the prescribed mechanical examinations of enginemen and firemen for promotion. In the absence of the trainmaster, the road foreman of engines will, when necessary, exercise the authority of the trainmaster.

ENGINEMEN.

834. Enginemen report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They must obey the instructions of the road foreman of engines and also station agents, yardmasters, station masters and train and engine dispatchers within their jurisdiction. They must obey the conductor in charge of their train as to general management of their train, unless by so doing they endanger the safety of the train or violate the rules. In mechanical matters they must comply with the instructions of the master mechanic, and within engine house territory they will comply with instructions of the engine house foreman or his representative.
835. Enginemen are responsible for the proper management of the engines in their charge, and must know that the engine is furnished with the necessary signals and supplies. If any part of the engine machinery requires attention, the engineman must reduce speed or stop so that the observance of all signals and the safety of the train movement may be assured.
836. When there is no conductor, or when the conductor is incapacitated, the engineman will, unless otherwise directed, have charge of the train and will be governed by the rules prescribed for conductors.
837. Enginemen are responsible for the performance of duty by firemen, and will when necessary instruct them in such duties. The fireman, when competent, may handle the engine under the supervision of the engineman, the engineman being responsible. The phrase "when competent" means that firemen who have passed all of their examinations for promotion to engineman and who, in addition, have been certified by a road foreman of engines in engine operation, may operate either No. 3 or No. 4 service under the personal supervision of the engineman and then only when the engineman in charge of the engine is willing to assume responsibility. Firemen with one year's actual service as a fireman who have passed a satisfactory examination given by a road foreman of engines and have been issued a certificate to that effect may operate engines in freight yard and local freight service when authorized by the engineman, the engineman being responsible. Firemen with less than one year's actual service are not allowed to handle engines.
838. Enginemen must not leave their engines or RDC cars while on duty except in case of necessity, and then the fireman must be left in charge. When the engine is unattended, whether on the road, siding, other track or at the engine house, the independent brake must be left in application position and brakes applied; on an electric engine the main oil circuit breaker or main D.C. knife switch must be opened, master controller handle in the "off" position and hand brake applied and, in addition, the wheels must be blocked where conditions require. When leaving Diesel-electric engines at end of trip, leave engine brake in applied position, leave control push button "in," remove reverse handle and place on top of master controller, pull out all other push buttons in master controller, except lights as required, apply hand brake on each unit. In cold weather guard against freezing.
NOTE. -The same requirements apply to Rail Diesel type cars except the engine brake must be applied and the hand brake applied on each unit regardless of the place.
839. Enginemen must exercise care in starting and stopping the train, and in moving and coupling cars, so as to avoid disturbance or injury to occupants and damage to property.
840. The whistle must not be sounded while passing or being passed by a passenger train, except in case of emergency or as prescribed by the rules.
841. Enginemen must, at the end of each trip, make written report on prescribed form of repairs necessary to the engine.
842. When a train has more than one engine the requirements of the rules apply alike to the engineman of each engine, but the use of the engine bell, whistle and the air brake, except in emergency, will be limited to the leading engine.
843. An engineman must not perform service on territory over which he has qualified on the physical characteristics if, after qualifying, a period of 6 months has elapsed during which no service has been performed thereon. The period of renewal may be extended or restricted by the superintendent.

FIREMEN.

850. Firemen report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative and must obey the instructions of station agents, yardmasters, stationmasters and train and engine dispatchers within their jurisdiction. They must obey the conductor in charge of the train unless by so doing they endanger the safety of the train or violate the rules. While assigned to an engine they are under the direction of and must obey instructions of the engineman.
Firemen must take charge of the engine in the absence of the engineman, and not leave it until he returns, nor allow unauthorized persons thereon; and must not move it, unless in emergency they are so instructed by the conductor or other authority. If the engineman is incapacitated, the fireman must stop the engine and report to the conductor.
851. While engine is moving firemen must keep a constant lookout when not necessarily engaged in other duties, and give immediate notice to engine man of any signals or other conditions affecting the safety or movement of their train. Firemen are responsible for assisting the engineman in all things requisite for the safe and prompt movement of their train or engine.

OPERATORS AND LEVERMEN.

860. Operators and levermen report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They must obey instructions of chief train dispatcher, train dispatchers or train directors, also must comply with the instructions of other departments in their jurisdiction. When on duty they are responsible for the handling and delivery of train orders and telegrams to the persons addressed, for arranging the use of blocks, tracks, interlocking, switches, highway crossing devices and signals and for the prompt and safe movement of trains in accordance with the rules, train orders and special instructions.
Operators handling commercial business must conform to the rules and regulations of the Western Union Telegraph Company as issued and instructed by the Superintendent of Communication.
861. When relieved, operators must make written transfer on prescribed form of all train orders and all other forms in effect and any other information required on the form. The relieving operator must compare the train order numbers with those shown on the transfer and note the time and sign the transfer.
The office copies of train orders, Clearance Form A, Register Card Form D and M.H.C. Forms and block records must be filed and preserved as required by law or special instructions.
862. Operators must make such wire connections on switchboards and wire tests as directed by the railroad wire chief and obey his instructions promptly. They must not, except in emergency, make any wire connections unless directed, and must, when called in on the circuit by a wire chief, remain cut in until released by him.
At offices where Western Union wires enter for testing, they must make such wire connections on switchboards and wire tests as requested by Western Union wire chiefs or maintenance forces.
863. Operators must observe all interruptions to circuits and make frequent examinations of switchboards, relays, keys, lightning arresters and other devices, reporting promptly any trouble or abnormal conditions to the wire chief or train dispatcher.
864. Operators must report the weather as required, and in case of sudden change, heavy storm, or fog, promptly advise the train dispatcher.
They must notify the train dispatcher immediately if their relief fails to report at the prescribed time.

STATION AGENTS.

875. Station agents report to and receive their instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They must comply with instructions from officers of other departments on matters pertaining to those departments.
They will have charge of the railroad's business, property and station employes at their respective stations and must preserve order in and about the station, that the buildings and grounds are kept in proper condition, and give necessary attention to fire protection. They must see that no unauthorized person has access to the ticket and freight offices, baggage and freight rooms.
They must have on file and be familiar with General Car Order and Home Route Instructions, special car orders and instructions issued by General Superintendent of Transportation pertaining to the handling or movement of freight equipment. They will be responsible for compliance of instructions.
876. Station agents must see that all freight which requires shelter is promptly placed in freight house or in cars. Freight houses must be locked, and cars containing freight, which can be closed, must be sealed or locked at all times, except when the agent or other authorized person is in immediate charge thereof. Seals must be kept in a secure place and the required seal records made. Freight, baggage or express must not be left between main tracks, nor within 6 feet of the edge of main track platform. Unless otherwise provided, they are responsible for keeping gates in intertrack fences closed and locked when not in use, also mail, baggage and express trucks left standing on station platforms must be chained.
877. Station agents will attend to the sale of tickets and to the receiving, delivering and forwarding of baggage and freight and collections for the same; see that cars are promptly loaded or unloaded and forwarded; keep the accounts, and make reports and remittances, in the manner prescribed.
878. L.C.L. freight unloaded must be checked by the agent or his representative. They must have waybills in proper order so that freight to be loaded can be checked therefrom; the apparent condition noted, and any over, short or in bad order reported in the manner prescribed.
879. Station agents must not permit advertisements to be posted on the Company's premises except those duly authorized.
They will post in a conspicuous place, the public timetables, tariffs and other matter issued by the traffic department.
They must know that the Company's advertising matter is properly displayed and of the issue in effect.
880. Station agents must see that ticket and freight offices and baggage rooms are open at the prescribed time.
881. Station agents must attend to the handling of United States mail between mail cars and postoffices when within the legal limit, and at junctions, to the transfer of mail, unless otherwise provided for. Mail pouches and parcel post packages must be protected. They will notify postmasters of time-table changes and advise the superintendent of changes in post-office locations.
882. Station agents must, unless otherwise provided, designate the places where vehicles shall be allowed to stand at the station, and where the persons in charge thereof, hotel porters and other authorized solicitors shall remain while engaged in their duties on railroad property.
883. Skids, trucks and portable scales, when not in use, should be placed in baggage room or warehouse; if necessary to leave them on platforms, they should be lined up at the end or in the rear of station building, and must be locked or otherwise secured, with the handles fastened in a nearly vertical position.

FOREMEN CAR INSPECTORS.

885. Foremen car inspectors report to and receive instructions from the master mechanic or his representative. They are responsible for the performance of duty by car inspectors and of others assigned to their jurisdiction, and will when necessary instruct them in such duties. They must know that all inspectors under their jurisdiction have passed the required examinations.

CAR INSPECTORS.

890. Car inspectors report to and receive instructions from the foreman; if no foreman has jurisdiction, they will receive instructions from the master mechanic or his representative. They must be familiar with all clearances, and not allow to go forward a car which exceeds the clearance dimensions or is in an unsafe condition. They must be familiar with the rules of the Operating Department, the A.A.R. rules and special instructions pertaining to their duties.

CROSSING WATCHMEN.

895. Crossing watchmen report to and receive instructions from the superintendent or his representative. They must be on the lookout at all times for movements in either direction on the tracks, and must not depend upon the schedules of trains nor on warning appliance for warning of approaching trains.
The following signals will be used by crossing watchmen
Day signals {A stop sign. { A red flag. {Torpedoes and fusees.
Night signals {A four lens lamp. {One four lens lamp for each gate. {A red light. {Torpedoes and fusees.
896. When crossing watchmen go off duty lighted lamps must be left on gates that are to be operated by trainmen.
897. Where crossing gates are provided, unless otherwise provided, crossing gate lamp will be attached to each gate arm at night showing red toward the highway and white toward the track. The gates must be completely lowered on both sides of track in ample time before approaching rail movement reaches the crossing and kept lowered until such rail movement has passed the crossing and until the crossing watchman is sure that no other rail movement is approaching.
897a. Crossing watchmen will not permit unauthorized persons to enter or loiter in or about crossing cabins.
898. At public crossings not protected by gates, when a rail movement is approaching, crossing watchmen must place themselves in the middle of the highway near the track, and remain there until it is safe for vehicles and pedestrians to cross the track. By day they will display a stop sign, holding it in upright position so that the word "STOP" will plainly appear to any person approaching on the highway. By night, or when stop sign cannot be plainly seen, they will display a four lens lamp, swinging it horizontally across the highway, red lenses toward highway traffic, white lenses toward track. When prescribed signals are not available, a red hand signal will be used. When protecting crossings, employes must not give hand, flag or lamp signal governing train, engine or motor hand car movements, except to prevent accident.
898a. Crossing watchmen must observe passing trains for defects, and should there be any dangerous condition noted they must, when practicable, exchange hand signals with train crew and take such other action prescribed by Rule 727. They must keep the flangeway clear of ice, snow, dirt and other obstructions; also keep crossing cabins in clean and tidy condition.
When switching movements are being made over the crossing they must be especially careful and cooperate with the crew switching for the safe movement of pedestrians or vehicles over the track as prescribed by Rules 737 and 738. If the track at or near the crossing is obstructed and may affect rail movements they will take prompt and necessary action for full protection for rail movement involved.
899. When crossing gates or other crossing warning devices are out of order, the crossing watchman must, until repairs have been made, protect the crossing as prescribed by Rule 898.

PASSENGER SERVICE.

900. Wood coaches, combination or mail cars in passenger service must not be placed between steel cars or between steel cars and the engine, but may be hauled in the same train behind steel cars, except that wood cars must not, unless to meet some unforeseen traffic emergency, be substituted for steel cars or placed in trains of which the normal make up is entirely of steel equipment.
901. Wood express, baggage or other cars (except mail cars) not occupied by pas
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Many Many Thanks
Third cup of coffee. Yes, This is exactly what I needed.

I like the rules about overhanging loads within the first six cars or last six cars of the train. also, chaining cars behind cabooses, and speed restrictions, those are all very interesting and will add some fun to our operations.

The description of the reporting structure, especially to the Dispatcher are very helpful.
Just having a list of all the crew members and their titles is real great. Guess I need to figure out what sort of uniforms or work clothes are used for each of those positions.

Thanks again for some really great information.

Is it possible someone would have a similar list of rules for a small logging railroad or short-line?

Everyone should bookmark this and take the time to read it. Then, see how some of the rules can be applied to your operation. It should make running your train more interesting and fun.
 
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