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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just starting out my layout want to plan ahead and have a signature bridge going in front of a waterfall. Don't really know where to start collecting data. Would appreciate any advice on different methods and pro's and con's of each from your experience (so I know what I'm getting into
). Thanks
 

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Some of the bridge type will depend on the place where you want to cross... distance, pier placement, height, etc. Some will depend on what you see in your mind's eye when you think about the bridge.

To get a good start on what bridges look like, start with a Google search for "Railroad Bridges"... LOTS of photos out there.

Then you can begin to narrow down the type, based on reading the terminology about the bridges that appeal to you... Girder, Suspension, Truss, etc. Keep refining your Google search by adding the terms that describe what appeals to you.

From that you can narrow it down some more based on the place you want to bridge.

Once you get it down to "THAT" bridge, I am sure folk here will have lots to suggest to you about materials and methods to use to build it.
 

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If you are interested in manufacturers of large scale bridges, I can recommend Eaglewings Iron Craft.


They manufactured two twin 6 foot steel bridges for our layout. Beautiful job, and a real crowd pleaser. Just wish I had a better photo:

 

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Funny, Ive just written an article on a bridge buiding method, you might find this useful



The girderwork is from 25mm Facia trim. Its available in 5 metre length from facia and UVPC window suppliers (shockingly) for only £5.

I used just over 2 bits for this bridge.

I went looking for an alternative to styrene products like Plastitruct and Evergreen cos it's expensive once you start using a lot of it,
also this is stronger than styrene.

The real boon is that this stuff is designed to be stuck together with Cyano. In this case I used the very low viscoucity "pink" flash glue.
It sticks in about 30 secs and after 5 mins or so I tried to part two test pieces and the plastic broke and the joint held. So its quick easy,
in short this is all you need.



I got the Mesh from an aquatic shop, its used to seperate big an baby fish so the latter dont get yummed.

The top bit is left at 25mm angle, the bottom bit is cut lengthways so its about 13 by 13mm. You can use a par of compassess pressed
against the edge of the angle to score a line along it. Do this 3 times and them cut with a Stanley or similar. Use this method to make
the uprights also.

The 12mm flat strip you can then score in half lengthways, 3 times should do it. Tke care not to go right through though.These will form
the diagonal braces, cut them to the desired length and then fold them to a right angle and glue from top corner to opposite corner
of the uprights

Lastly cut some of the 12mm flat strip in half to make trim for the edge of the deck.



Spray the whole lot with a rattle can of matt black or grey or what ever you want and add the track. Knock up a couple of abutments
out of the same stuff with some brass contacts and you are there.



A very quick and easy alternative to welding steel and alloy and so cheap.







The first one is about 4ft long and this next one is 6ft. The first one is def strong and rigid enough, we shall see about the arch ......



It will replace this rubbish bit of 3 by 3 which is my steam up area.



later
 

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I like that second bridge Rodders. I shall have to have a try with that material, as I have a couple of bridges left to do.

Rod F.
 

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That's great Rod

I made a simple girder bridge out of PVC downspout and plastruct angles and T's. It's not dramatic but it works well. The piers are cast concrete. I did a thread about it in the track and trestles forum





Eagle Wings Ironcraft does great stuff but it's not cheap.
 

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Hi,

The Kalmbach book on 'Model Railroad Bridges and Trestles' is a good reasonable comprehensive book, mainly HO gauge but the plans can soon be expanded!
 

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I just finished my first attempt to make a bridge. The hardest part was trying to decide what kind of bridge to make and how real looking you want to go with it. I decided to make a Howe Truss bridge and to make it look close to real but not perfect. My layout is more for the kids to play with and handle some bangin around so being perfect is not important to me.

The biggest piece of advice is to make it fun and be creative, put your own twist to it.



I did make it wider and taller than the real thing to allow for different size cars and allow for derailment issues. I have more pictures on my web site if you care to get a better look at it.



http://users.eastlink.ca/~brownscountry
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks alot guys I have been doing google searches for different bridges. I think I want to go with something metal looking (does not necessarily have to be metal just the style). I think this has helped give me some guidance. I just would like to do something that is fairly dramatic, but not overly complex. I will update when I get a little better idea of something I would like to imitate. I thank you for taking the time to share with me. This has been very helpful for me.
 

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Yes, lots of good ideas here! I see some I'd like to duplicate.

Here is my bridge, made from cabinet shelf brackets and welding rod.

 

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I've seen a couple of very simple multi-span concrete arch bridges on garden railroads. Nothing very complicated though.
 

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You can also combine different types of bridges in to one bridge:



The steel portion of this bridge was made using a template. A template was made using 1/2" x 1/2" bar stock. The template is very simple: One hole at one end, then two holes at the other end. I don't recall now what the distances were, but I think the first hole to the second hole was about 12 inches, and the fist hole to the third hole was like 14". What we did was to cut two bars equal length ( I think we worked with 66"). Then, moving 3" in, we drilled the first through hole. A bolt was pushed through the lone template hole, the newly drilled hole, and a nut placed on the other side. Then, a new hole was drilled using the 2nd hole. This process continued until all the holes were drilled. The diagonal members had their holes drilled the same way, using the #1 and #3 holes for guides. The cross members of the bidge were drilled and tapped. Then. all the parts were assembled. The bridge fit together perfectly.

The trestle portion was made in a similar fashion. One bent was made by hand, getting it all lined up. Once done, a template was created to hold the pieces as they were screwed together. Once the bents were made, it was a simple task to make the bridge deck. When this bridge was built in 1995, I used what was available, LGB flex track. That's where the bridge spacing came from. It was a simple matter to attach the bents together.

For a simpler bridge, you can also use a piece of 8" channel:


Note, that bridge was not quite level, and was fixed. However, the beauty of the 8" channel is you can fill it with ballast, so you don't need to worry much about transitions on and off the bridge.
 

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Mark is right. It is not at all Un-prototypical for a bridge over one space to be multiple types of spans. If you subscribe to TRAINS magazine, take a look at the photo on page 66 of the July 2008 issue. You can see a portion of it behind the arch bridge here:

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jmohney/belle_vernon_bridge_mid_1950s_b.jpg



Notice the two heights of the Howe truss type undergirder (tall over the water and short over land) and an under plate girder for the portion over the spindley iron girder towers over the land. Also note the concrete piers for the Howe portion and iron girder towers for the rest.

Makes one wonder just how many engineers worked on the design!
 

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Posted By Steeeeve on 10/06/2008 4:03 PM
Has anyone ever built a concrete bridge? I'd love to make something like the below picture:




Is that one of the bridges for the Lackawanna Railroad?
 

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Posted By GrizzlyFlatsFan on 10/07/2008 9:39 PM
Posted By Steeeeve on 10/06/2008 4:03 PM
Has anyone ever built a concrete bridge? I'd love to make something like the below picture:




Is that one of the bridges for the Lackawanna Railroad?


Variously known as the Nicholson Viaduct or the Tunkhannock Creek Bridge or Tunkhannock Creek Viaduct.

See several photos at:

http://rides.webshots.com/album/560696567LWFyjn[\url]
 

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Posted By Semper Vaporo on 10/08/2008 12:20 AM
Posted By GrizzlyFlatsFan on 10/07/2008 9:39 PM
Posted By Steeeeve on 10/06/2008 4:03 PM
Has anyone ever built a concrete bridge? I'd love to make something like the below picture:




Is that one of the bridges for the Lackawanna Railroad?


Variously known as the Nicholson Viaduct or the Tunkhannock Creek Bridge or Tunkhannock Creek Viaduct.

See several photos at:

http://rides.webshots.com/album/560... my house :)" align="absmiddle" border="0" />
 
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