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Posted By morganstapleton on 01/30/2009 11:23 AM
Tac;


It is exactly because Gordon won't be making more that I would like to see Aster do it.
It is similar in size to one or two tank engines that they made earlier. RoundHouse would
be fine, except that it is not Aster!



Regards;
Morgan




Sorry to reiterate a point made by the US Aster man to a poster on this thread - but Aster have given up on tiny locos to concentrate of making big oens that will give them their million $$$ back in sales.

Besides, when was the last time that Aster made a tiny narrow gauge loco? And what gauge track would it run on? To be correct re. scale and gauge in 1/32nd , it would have to run on the so-far unheard-of gauge of 23.8mm. The previous Aster tank locos were both standard gauge, I recall.

You and I will be very old men, or dust in the wind, before we see Aster make a little loco again.

tac
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Tac, Aster has in the past done a few NG engines, C&S Mogul, Old Faithful, and Reno, to name a few I remember, they also do 1:30 for some, this is to keep the scale correct for gauge one track. Not just 1:32, Aster's business approach is to offer both ready to run and kits. This is a large added expense. They have been in this business for over 30 years. I think they have found there is little point in making 400 smaller less detailed engine for maybe $5000.00 that will take about 10 years to sell out ( think Mikado here)( and it would cost more then that if made today!) VS making 250 units that will sell for just under $10,000.00 for a RTR, If were lucky, that may sell out in 2 to 3 years ( think Berkshire and S-2 size and type of engine here) They may make the same amount of profit, but it takes 3 times a long to get it. That also means your money it tied up longer, so there is a longer lag time between engines. They also make extra parts for each engine, which adds to the final price, some of which hang around and collect dust for 30 years, and some they run out of. I think they have even re-produced a few parts, like fire grates for their coal fired engines. But they do not keep their old tooling so if they would do a 2nd run of something, they are starting from scratch again. Yes I know they did 2 runs of the BIG BOY, and are doing a few more Garrets but those are rare exceptions. This is as I understand it.

Roundhouse choses to make the same engine available for many years, make a few small changes over the years and not overly concerned with "scale accuracy", but rather making very sturdy engines, all NG I believe.
This goes a long way to keep cost down but is not much interest to the " Fine Scale Collector" But it works for Roundhouse, Has for a long time.

I'll just wait and see...
 

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Mr Runge - thank you for re-explaining it, but living in the heartland of live-steam gauge 1 I am well aware what models Aster has made over the last thirty-something years, and how the financial costings function in order to get an Aster model made, from having lived in Tokyo and having the pleasure of talking to Aster employees at first hand.

Additionally, I have been running two Roundhouse locomotives of my own since the early 1990's, so I am also well-acquainted with Roundhouse history and build philosophy as well.

The fact of the matter is that the Australian Na locomotive runs on 2ft 6in gauge track and to my recollection, Aster has NEVER made a locomotive of any kind to fit this tiny gauge in either 1/32nd or 1/30th scales.

Assuming 45mm track to scaled to 2ft 6in would need a model aN scaled at 1/18th scale to look right.

Roundhouse make models in about 1/19th, or slightly larger, to run on 45mm and 32mm track - can you see Aster making a model to this scale?

tac
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Tac, No I could not see Aster doing that, I think your options would be scratch building your self or having someone do it for you... making it a "one of a kind" thing. I guess I did not understand your original post.. I took it to mean Aster only ever made 1:32 for gauge one track, hence my reply. Hopefully my reply was helpful to some.
Jeff
 

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Not to beat a dead horse, I want small engines. The S-12 is excellent. Yes, while mine wasn't perfect out of the box, she proved herself at DH. I don't hold Accucraft at fault, it was a shipping issue. Cliff went above and beyond to get me fixed. Special note goes to Norm Saley and Tom Meyers for their assistance in the final tuning.

At $2k, the S-12 is a bargin, and as I understand, she sold out quick, or is damn close to being gone. The best run at DH was with 15 cars and a brass caboose on the green track. Coming around the back corner she crawled and barked up the hill. A very impressive site.

I know Accucraft and Aster both did a Daylight. I'd love to have two S-12s, one Accucraft and one Aster. Or better yet, the first company to offer a Hiawatha, I'll pre-order, even if I have to sell the wheels off my chair.
 

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Maybe I shouldnt stick my oar in..but..we did build the Nas and after a long hiatus built one final one for client in Melbourne in 2007..it was interesting to look and realise how much we had learnt in 15 years since the originals..this one was not aproduction model except in the frames /chassis area as we had no etches left the body work etc was hand made completely..Id like to do more but ageing legs and alist of custom orders 3 or 4years long will see me finished!

As too what prototype for USA easy Large: UP FEF 4-8-4 or L&N M1 4-8-4 mid size CNW 4-4-2 or SP A4 4-4-2 small NYC 999.

Gordon
 

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Mr Runge- no problems this end, and yes, your response was useful to many others reading this thread, I'm sure. Aster also made most, if not all, of their Japanese outline locomotives in 1/30th scale because they are, effectively, narrow gauge prototypes running on the principal Japanese Cape Gauge [3ft 6in], and look VERY small compared with US/Can stuff. In fact, the C61 'Swallow' looks like a 5/8th scale model of the full-size US Hudson, even down to the Scullin-type wheels.

tac
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