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My Rx is currently a DSM so do I need to upgrade to a DSM2 in order to use a RCS Tx3? Also, what type of battery does the Tx3 use? I will communicate with RCS. Right now, I am just trying to get the basics.
Hello Yelow_cad.
Yes, you will need to update to DSM2/DSMX. The old DSM2 standard is not compatible with the latest versions.
Once upon a time all types and brands of R/C would basically work together.
Nowadays they do not. Spectrum (DSM2/DSMX) for example will not work with Futaba.
However, all is not lost. DSM2/DSMX is a specific protocol that has a number of different makers supporting it. For example low cost 2.4 GHz Rx's are available from Orange (Hobby King) Lemon (Xenon), Deltang and Micron in the UK and RCS in Australia.
Most of the after market Tx handpieces use a regular 9 volt PP3 type of battery.
Apart from offering automatic binding (as distinct from removable plug induced binding) one other useful feature is some of the Tx and Rx combinations can also be used for battery R/C.
 

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Hello Yelow_cad.
Yes, you will need to update to DSM2/DSMX. The old DSM2 standard is not compatible with the latest versions.
Once upon a time all types and brands of R/C would basically work together.
Nowadays they do not. Spectrum (DSM2/DSMX) for example will not work with Futaba.
However, all is not lost. DSM2/DSMX is a specific protocol that has a number of different makers supporting it. For example low cost 2.4 GHz Rx's are available from Orange (Hobby King) Lemon (Xenon), Deltang and Micron in the UK and RCS in Australia.
Most of the after market Tx handpieces use a regular 9 volt PP3 type of battery.
Apart from offering automatic binding (as distinct from removable plug induced binding) one other useful feature is some of the Tx and Rx combinations can also be used for battery R/C.
Ooooooops.
That should read: The old DSM standard is not compatible with the latest versions.
 

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You can take some artistic license in your choice of loco. I have an Accucraft "Countess" which looks a bit like an English tank engine, so I run it with scale-unknown Bachmann Thomas trucks. (I'm posting the video to whet your appetite for a live steamer :))
The Accucraft 'Countess' and 'The Earl' don't just 'look like an English tank engine', they were built in England by Beyer-Peacock in 1902 to run on the Welshpool & Llanfair Railway, where they still run.
 

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Well, this here is another vote for the beautiful Roundhouse Davenport. I watched one in motion at the recent Peterborough show - fitted with a Slo-Mo - and hauling a goodly consist at around 10 smph making some very fine stack talk as it did so. As mentioned here a GAZILLION times before, RH have a well-earned reputation for customer support world-wide - they really are on the end of a phone-call, remembering the time-zone difference, of course. Had I a need for such a loco there really is nothing else to compare.
 

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The family resemblance between the Welshpool narrow gauge tanks and other Great Western tank engines (take, as but one example, the "Metro" tanks) is quite deliberate. The W&L was taken over by the Cambrian, which in turn became part of the GWR after the Grouping. Both of the narrow-gauge tank engines were rebuilt by the new parent company in their shops and incorporate many of the features of their standard-gauge cousins, including a switch from left-hand to right-hand drive.

Also want to add another vote for Roundhouse, for anyone considering a new steamer. If the Davenport is out of one's price range, the Sammy is also North American outline (apologies if this has already been mentioned in this thread). As Tac points out, customer support is outstanding; QC is above reproach and -- to my mind, best of all -- replacement parts are always available.
 

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Hopefully you are now looking at your reently acquired Ruby 2.
Your cell phone is a valuable tool for controlling any live steamer. Look at the clock when you first light off. Then, when the safety lifts, look again. Should take about 5 minutes. Then turn down the gas to ensure the safety doesn't lift any more as it sets off around the track. Too much pressure makes for higher speeds. My Ruby putters along with no cars and I get a long run by minimal throttle setting and low heat. Listen to the burner - if you can hear it, you're set too high.
Time your run, write down the time to running out of gas. Keep improving your run time.
Put a thin white mark at 12 o'clock on your gas and throttle knobs. Use them to reference how wide open your settings are (bad English?). Key goal? Have fun!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Thanks for the tips. I am experimenting more each day with what works best. I have made some videos, but can't seem to post them. Our club has a 230 ft. long track and I can go around it 2 3/4 times before running out of fuel. I was having a problem gassing up after the first run, but tried some thin ice cubes to cool down the gas tank that seemed to help quite a bit. Yes, it is fun even the learning.
 
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