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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Well, for a start it is not British - I think it's german. Take a look at this thread:
The Frank S, the real one, is alive and steaming again
Here's a more interesting description:
Locomotive of the Month
Most LGB locos will go around R1 (2' radius) curves, though I am not sure about this one. (Mike Toney's write-up says it will handle R1.)
After I posted, I saw it was German as I read the Locomotive of the Month. Thanks for the links though. I didn't see Mike Toney's write up you mentioned. I would like to read that.
 

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Frank S is German, ex WWII war dept locomotive that was unused in the war, found after the war by the Russians and put in service rebuilding eastern Germany. Engine is still in operation pulling passengers today. Excellent beginners model, make to use proper steam cylinder oil and NOT motor oil as suggested in the models original instruction manual. It will easily go around R1 curves, is set up to easily add single channel RC control and shows how in the instructions. Gas tank is in the tender and you must put warm water in the tank to keep gas pressure up. Has a large window in the backhead of the boiler to keep an eye on water level. Frank has the deep flanges like all LGB equipment, so it does well staying on the track, going thru tight R1 curves and switches.
 

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While I no longer have a Frank S, here is a video of the last one I owned running on my railway. I think the RH Billy is a much better model running wise, but that comes at a much higher price. Here is the video.
 

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Here is my Roundhouse Billy, which is a model of a Orienstien and Koppel engine, exported all over the world, even to America. Many still run all over the world, both in preservation and in revenue service in 3rd world countries.
 

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I model the Denver Rio Grande in say, 1932. I prefer a loco to look American rather than English.
You can take some artistic license in your choice of loco. I have an Accucraft "Countess" which looks a bit like an English tank engine, so I run it with scale-unknown Bachmann Thomas trucks. (I'm posting the video to whet your appetite for a live steamer :))


There's a D&RGW 0-6-0 tank engine Class 48, Baldwin 6-22D, that bears a resemblance to many Roundhouse and Accucraft products. I have David Fletcher's drawings and livery notes, and here's a pic of the loco:

Train Vehicle Steam engine Wheel Locomotive


There are a couple of new 'generic' Baldwin locos about to be shipped. The Bowande 0-6-0 from TTD would make a good base for adding a saddle tank and painting it in D&RGW livery. There's a 2-6-0 from Accucraft that might also work for you.
 

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I do like Frank S, easy to operate and should work on tight curves.

You may also like the Accucraft Forney. It was my first engine, small and easy to operate and add RC to. I detailed mine and am pleased with it.

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
After lots of looking and almost moves, I called a local friend that is big on G Scale (mostly battery), but has live steam contacts and he gave me a name of a person getting too old to do much anymore and said he thought he had some things for sale. I talked to the guy (nice old guy not that I'm young he's just older) and I going over tonight to get from him a Ruby 2 with tender and R/C (everything is there except the transmitter). I was pretty sure it would take my curves and I took the advice you gave to get something basic and get my feet wet in live steam. I do have a couple of questions: while I do have some regular R/C transmitters, isn't there a simple transmitter that will work and be much smaller (like for R/C cars)? Also, with the Ruby 2 having R/C and say a string of cars, would it become somewhat manageable? I have access to a club layout with easy eye level operation so I intend to cut my teeth on it by running just loco and tender until I know what I am doing and then work on the management part. Thanks for all the help I have you received from all of you. Jim
 

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After lots of looking and almost moves, I called a local friend that is big on G Scale (mostly battery), but has live steam contacts and he gave me a name of a person getting too old to do much anymore and said he thought he had some things for sale. I talked to the guy (nice old guy not that I'm young he's just older) and I going over tonight to get from him a Ruby 2 with tender and R/C (everything is there except the transmitter). I was pretty sure it would take my curves and I took the advice you gave to get something basic and get my feet wet in live steam. I do have a couple of questions: while I do have some regular R/C transmitters, isn't there a simple transmitter that will work and be much smaller (like for R/C cars)? Also, with the Ruby 2 having R/C and say a string of cars, would it become somewhat manageable? I have access to a club layout with easy eye level operation so I intend to cut my teeth on it by running just loco and tender until I know what I am doing and then work on the management part. Thanks for all the help I have you received from all of you. Jim
Sounds Great!
 

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Look at the palm size transmitters from RCS, made in Australia and has an awsome website. I dislike a twin stick transmitter for a train. Coming from the smaller scales, the palm size transmitter with its knobs is much easier for me to keep a consistant slow speed with the throttle over the stick style radio. His tx works with any DSM2/DSMX receiver, I happen to use Spectrum brand as I can source them locally from the RC hobby shop.
 

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Look at the palm size transmitters from RCS, made in Australia and has an awsome website. I dislike a twin stick transmitter for a train. Coming from the smaller scales, the palm size transmitter with its knobs is much easier for me to keep a consistant slow speed with the throttle over the stick style radio. His tx works with any DSM2/DSMX receiver, I happen to use Spectrum brand as I can source them locally from the RC hobby shop.
 

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Would wholeheartedly agree with the choice of RCS Tx's (and Rx's). Simple and brilliant. I use one Tx for all my locos. Rx's are very small and very programmable. Not an expensive system either. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I went to the RCS website and wasn't sure what I needed. I am in the USA and only need to move one servo and, as Mike said, I can see that a dial control is better than a stick. Which unit do I need?
 

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For most engines, the TX1 is really all you need. Email Tony W, who runs RCS, very nice chap to chat with and he can help you choose exactly what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Given that you only need 1 TX and it will last you for years, I'd suggest a TX3 or TX5, that have additional triggers for future functions.
In general, you can unplug the RX in your loco and put in a DSM2 version. RCS autobind units are very simple to use.
Pete, I don't understand your second paragraph. BTW I made a mistake. I have two servos (throttle and direction). I am just getting to know this thing.
 

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He was just saying, get the Tx3 or 5 with the extra channels so you have room for future growth as you could possible own a even nicer engine that needs more RC channels for functions in the future. You can use 1 transmitter for several engines. I use my one TX1 to run 2 different live steamers and 4 different battery electric locomotives(just not at same time, just one at a time). Its nice to not need a seperate RC transmitter for each locomotive.
 

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In general, you can unplug the RX in your loco and put in a DSM2 version. RCS autobind units are very simple to use.
Two things here: first, that all receivers (RX) are (usually) interchangeable, and as servos have the same plugs they all fit. So make a note of which servo is plugged in to which of the 6 or 8 sets of pins on the RX, and just swap the RX for a DSM2 version.

The second part is about 'binding'. The DSM2 (and most modern r/c systems,) is digital, so the TX and RX exchange names (ids) and from then on will only talk to each other. Saves a lot of problems with other locos on the same type of r/c (ask me how I know.)
Usually the RX comes with a bind adapter - the orange thing below.


When plugged in, it tells the RX to go in to bind mode, so you do the same on the TX (usually by pushing a 'bind' button,) and the two then link. Turn them both off, unplug the bind link, and you are done.
Finally, RCS sells an 'autobind' version of their RX, which puts itself in 'bind' mode without any bind plug, and (I think) links itself to the first TX it hears/notices. Much simpler than taking your loco apart to bind it to a new TX because you lost the old one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
My Rx is currently a DSM so do I need to upgrade to a DSM2 in order to use a RCS Tx3? Also, what type of battery does the Tx3 use? I will communicate with RCS. Right now, I am just trying to get the basics.
 
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