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I can't really think of any 3' gauge D&RGW locos that are available in live steam that will handle 3' radius. Most of the models are 2-8-0 or 2-8-2, as the D&RGW needed big engines, so our models are big too!

The Mimi and other Ruby derivatives are nice, but run like scalded cats. Not easy to slow them down. Regner's locos are nice, and I really like my Heisler, which is a model of Heisler #1 and will take 2' radius LGB track. The Lumberjack is a really nice runner too.

I'd really suggest getting a starter loco, even if it isn't pure 1932 D&RGW, so you can experience the joys of live steam. There's a strong resale market, so buy a Lumberjack and see how you like it. Or a RH Davenport, or Accucraft Dora.

As you have a layout width of 11', can't you push the corners out to at least 4' radius? And 5' would be even better and will handle most D&RGW live steamers.
 

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I model the Denver Rio Grande in say, 1932. I prefer a loco to look American rather than English.
You can take some artistic license in your choice of loco. I have an Accucraft "Countess" which looks a bit like an English tank engine, so I run it with scale-unknown Bachmann Thomas trucks. (I'm posting the video to whet your appetite for a live steamer :))


There's a D&RGW 0-6-0 tank engine Class 48, Baldwin 6-22D, that bears a resemblance to many Roundhouse and Accucraft products. I have David Fletcher's drawings and livery notes, and here's a pic of the loco:

Train Vehicle Steam engine Wheel Locomotive


There are a couple of new 'generic' Baldwin locos about to be shipped. The Bowande 0-6-0 from TTD would make a good base for adding a saddle tank and painting it in D&RGW livery. There's a 2-6-0 from Accucraft that might also work for you.
 

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In general, you can unplug the RX in your loco and put in a DSM2 version. RCS autobind units are very simple to use.
Two things here: first, that all receivers (RX) are (usually) interchangeable, and as servos have the same plugs they all fit. So make a note of which servo is plugged in to which of the 6 or 8 sets of pins on the RX, and just swap the RX for a DSM2 version.

The second part is about 'binding'. The DSM2 (and most modern r/c systems,) is digital, so the TX and RX exchange names (ids) and from then on will only talk to each other. Saves a lot of problems with other locos on the same type of r/c (ask me how I know.)
Usually the RX comes with a bind adapter - the orange thing below.


When plugged in, it tells the RX to go in to bind mode, so you do the same on the TX (usually by pushing a 'bind' button,) and the two then link. Turn them both off, unplug the bind link, and you are done.
Finally, RCS sells an 'autobind' version of their RX, which puts itself in 'bind' mode without any bind plug, and (I think) links itself to the first TX it hears/notices. Much simpler than taking your loco apart to bind it to a new TX because you lost the old one!
 

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Here is a photo of my steamer
Incidentally, the tender versions of those locos are quite rare. Accucraft offered the tender separately and few people seem to have ordered one.
Yours looks nicely turned out. How about some more, larger photos so we can admire the handiwork. And do take a look at the pics on the page Tom mentioned!
 
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