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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I realize that 'white metal' is probably a loose term, and there is not one answer to this question, but I would like to cast in metal, and I'm hoping that there is an easy way to make solder stronger by adding something to it. I remember reading something last year about adding something, but could not find it in the archives. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Mostly zinc.

"Zinc#3" is Zinc, Aluminum, Copper, Magnesium, Iron, Lead, Cadmium and Tin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Tom.

So maybe a better question would be: Is there a reasonable way to make solder stronger by adding components?

Also, does anyone have a source for white metal to cast?
 

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Matt,

There used to be a white metal that could be cast at about the temperature of boiling water. You could make molds from wood and even strathmore board. It was called "Cerro Bend" and later version "Cerro Safe". It was quite popular for detail casting on the stove during the sixties. I don't know if it's still available but you might try a Google search.
 

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Penney's are readily of a local source of zinc. Any penny minted after 1982 is almost all zinc. I used to use them for metal casting all the time. Good luck.
Joel
 

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There are multiple types of "white metal" used for casting....while I don't know about what to add to solder to make it better for casting, but I do know that Micromark has casting metal ingots in their catalog....

http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action=Catalog&Type=Department&ID=122

Sure, none of it's "cheap", but it is interesting to see the different melting temps, and the mixes of metals used:

Type R lead-free Crown Pewter (92% tin). Melts at approx. 575 degrees F. Can be melted with propane torch

Type 280 tin/bismuth alloy; lead and cadmium free. Melts at approx. 280 degrees F

Type CT Almost pure lead. Melts at approx. 500 degrees F. Can be melted with propane torch

Type 160 tin/lead/cadmium/bismuth alloy. Melts at approx. 160 degrees F. Can be melted with a candle flame. Extremely low temp. allows this metal to be poured into molds of clay, wood, even cardboard. Can also be poured into model RR locomotives to increase traction weight.
 

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Hmm. Wondered what to do with all those zinc pennies. Somehow, I always get more pennies than I spend. I've been sorting the copper from the zinc ones for years.
 

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Isn't it still against the law to willingly destroy any type of currency minted or printed in the U.S.?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You are correct, Richard. The Secret Service has been notified of this thread./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/blush.gif
 

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YOW! I guess I better hide my weapons of mass destruction before they get here ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Wellll, I just got off the phone with American Tin & Solder Company. They were very helpful and patient with this newbie. I ordered 11 lbs of a pewter white-metal (ATS 88) for $11/lb plus $9.30 in shipping. He said it should be plenty strong enough for train wheels/tires. We'll see if it was money well spent, or money I should not have spent.
If anyone has any hints on how to cast metal, besides preheating the mold, pouring from as high as possible and plenty of vents, please let me know.
I guess I'd better get started making molds!

(I'll keep you posted on progress or failures.)

Thanks for your help, gents!
Matt

Edit: I forgot to mention how helpful Tekcast Industries was, even though from the beginning of the conversation he knew I was not purchasing enough from them (at least 25 lb min.) He spoke with me, giving advice for at least ten minutes with no hope of a sale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Posted By rkapuaala on 06/10/2008 10:19 AM
you can only cut up a few pennies with snips. A torch on the other hand!





Muuh ha ha!/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/w00t.gif
 

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Tommy plays with fire!
 

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Another source of scrap for casting is old Trophies made
of "Piuta" not to sure of the spelling, old mugs as well,
check out the old Junk Shops for old Trophies, if there
"Engraved" then they are not much good to most folks, you
should be able to pick up the lot for a song.

Regards,
John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Posted By John R on 06/11/2008 6:17 AM
Another source of scrap for casting is old Trophies ...

Regards,
John.




That's a great idea, John! The wife has a bunch of old trophies in the attic that she never looks at..
 

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I just got time to check out that site Matt. If you're casting wheels and tires from this stuff, it might be too soft. Looks like most folks use them for bullets and to determine bore diameter and rifiling. I would also be concerned about the lead content. It doesn't list the metals used in the alloy.
 
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