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This doesn't look like a US prototype to me. Spoked wheels are very, very rare on American cars, and the trucks do not look like any US style I have seen. The color and the method of opening the sides are also unlike typical US practice. It looks European to me.
 

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I tend to agree with Vance. It looks British to me. They tend to use gray and black on that type of car as well as spoked wheels on older cars.
 

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Hi Axel,

I don't think it is, I think it will be European narrow gauge, and possibly Swiss or Austrian in design. The company it is from specialise in that area of Europe, thus the suggestion. I would also think that the wagons are now out of use, as I think (not knowing very much!) that the narrow gauge rr's are mainly now passenger, if asked to choose which I would suggest Swiss. Freight traffic on narrow gauge is now been taken by the rise of the motor trucks generally
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info.  It is correct that this model was brought over to Europe, but according to someone, these flat cars came orgianlly from North America - aorund WWII time.  Oh well, too bad.  The legnth on the photo indicated a proportion of a 40' car, as far as I know there are no 40" low sided gondolas on the RhB, they are all shorter and 2 axle only.

I will keep on searching.
 

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Really don't think it comes from UK. much too long for British NG lines, end irons and steps also do not look like a UK wagon nor does the single full length drop side. I reckon its European.
Bunny
 

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Looks WD/MoD to me, and YES, probably of US origin, but one war earlier.

My father had a US Military Railway Engineering book of the era full of cars like this, but the book is lost in the mish-mash. A check of the Magor and ACF trench cars show some SIMILAR, but nothing exact....

Would be suited for the new WD Baldwin by Accucraft tho!

http://www.brandbright.co.uk/baldwin.htm

edit, cut and paste link above, it won't direct on this "improved" site.....
 

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Hi All,


I have attched a copy from an Swanswood Garden Railways (SM32) site of the British design of WW1 WDLR wagons; these were 17 foot long and the bogies were common under all the WDLR (war dept light railway) wagons . There werer many variations, and all I think were 17 foot long.

As can be seen it is shorter than the photos in the first message on this topic; I cannot find any photos via google to match photo 1 but still believe this will be based (?) on a WW1 US Army design somehow, and is quite long, certainly by British narrow gauge standards (and most are MUCH shorter indeed!)

Neither can Google assist with reasonably priced books on the WW1 Light railways, it seems to be a very sparsley documented subject; not really surprising as the stock involved was meant to have  a very short life!

The exception is the much illustrated Baldwin 4 6 0 tank, (by Accucraft) the full size 12" to 1 foot versions now being re-built, with one having been resurrected already, and the Welsh Highland have another! .


Flats were much used, as in narrow gauge rr's ,as they could & did take anything, and everything.  The body could easily have been added later, if the basic flat was in reasonable order when bought. 
 

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The 40' bit is long for MoD/WD use, assuming that this thing is 45mm gauge, maybe it is a 7/8" model?
 

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Posted By peter bunce on 02/17/2008 2:52 PM
Hi All,

The exception is the much illustrated Baldwin 4 6 0 tank, (by Accucraft) the full size 12" to 1 foot versions now being re-built, with one having been resurrected already, and the Welsh Highland have another! .




One can hope that the 4-6-0T Hunslet and 2-6-2T Alcos are not far behind?  Dunno......
 
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