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Super Modulator
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USAT and AML for freight cars, mainly because I can bolt body mount Kadee 830s on in minutes.

The cars they don't make I get Aristo. Coupler mounting pain in the butt.

Passenger cars: Aristo heavyweights, USAT streamliners.

Locomotives: Transition era diesel, mostly USAT 44 tonner, GP7, S4, NW-2, F3, PA, etc. The Aristo RS-3 is good.

Steam: AML K4, Aristo Mallet, Pacific, and Northern bashed from 2 Pacifics.

Have a Bachmann Shay and Annie, just could not resist, will probably get a 3 truck shay too.

Model Santa Fe, trying to stay to the locos they used... may snap some day and go more modern, or take off in 20.3...

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,798 Posts
Vinny, the RS-3 normally is a great runner and workhorse. Why not start a thread on it, there's lots of experience with them, and there's some GREAT sound files for that Alco!

Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,798 Posts
You most likely could repair the problem. It's either in the trucks, or quite often the main board.

The symptoms are like poor power pickup, stutters.


 

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Super Modulator
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21,798 Posts
It's most likely the wires from the trucks to the chassis underneath, when the trucks turn, you are getting an intermittent contact.

Maybe you could get the the replacement plugs and rewire.

Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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No, unfortunately stores are closing, fewer products are being made, and production runs are smaller and more limited.

But don't give up hope, with the recent sale of Marklin, maybe we will see a revitalization of LGB... glad it is to a company that seems interested.

Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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Semper, you are just starting out, and I see you are enthusiastic.... instead of finding old threads to revive, start a few ones with questions, that's my advice.

Thread necromancy is not good, once a thread has pretty much run it's course, it loses a lot of audience.

Do not be afraid to make multiple new posts with the questions you have, everyone knows you are new (at least to the forum).

Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,798 Posts
Yes, length of cars will make a difference, but what Mike says is comparing the same car truck mount vs. body mount, body mount will require larger curves is accurate.


But on the other hand, you would be surprised how tight a curve body mounts on rolling stock can handle. Normally it's the locomotives that are the issue, or 2 cars of very different lengths with body mounts.


Classic example is USAT SD70 with a short freight car coupled... overhang of SD70 will literally throw a 40' car off the track. (there are creative ways to mount couplers in this case)



Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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For DCC, maybe just one more, at the furthest point.


It's better to have just a few feeders and good rail joiners in DCC... you can actually overdo it with feeders.. an advanced topic.


Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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It's pretty simple conceptually, but often overlooked since most users are not engineers.


Basically in DCC you are trying to deliver the cleanest signal to the locomotives.


This means with the least distortion as compared to what comes out of the booster.


Have you heard of the use of snubbers at the ends of a "dead end" track?


Do you know about signal reflections?


If you do, then I probably don't need to say much more other than it happens at these frequencies.


Perhaps you understand the concept of ground loops?


Let me know if you are familiar with any of the above, as I can answer you in very few words.


Yes, to "current wisdom" is to connect a feeder to every rail, basically saying my joiners are crap... but you can cause other issues that affect the integrity of the signal, and then that still does not address dead end tracks.


Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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Great, so I can speak at a higher level!


So first DCC being a square wave, we have ringing, etc. distorting the signal.


The reflections at the ends of tracks will be necessarily out of phase reflections and further distort the signal, in extreme situations can radically reduce the signal as you know about an 180 degree out of phase signal.


In HO layouts, where the largest market is, it is very common to use a "snubber" at the end of any track segment, normally a resistor and a cap in series, to kill any reflections.


So, the problem of too many feeders is the potential for adding more signal that is not exactly in phase, due to the difference in distance since there is more than one path to any location, and by putting feeders close together, you actually enhance that danger....



most DCC issues is distortion of the waveform, not power issues.


soldering jumpers of course helps indoors, and outdoors the ultimate is bonding track sections together, better than clamps.


Anyway, there's the gist of it, more feeders can control voltage drop and get around bad joiners, but can have a detrimental effect on the signal quality.


Some day, let me tell you why stainless steel track is better for signal integrity than brass track...


Best regards,


Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,798 Posts
By the way, besides gleaning information from people I consider experts, I have actually put a scope on the rails in various places, and I'm lucky enough to have a portable DCC packet analyzer, that combined with my engineering background allow me to be confident in the analysis.



Of course this flies in the face of some of the "common wisdom" ha ha.


Greg
 
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