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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone answer some questions I have about the air brakes on flatcars? I am building some F scale cars and would like to put the rods and levers and such with the brake shoes to the outside of the trucks, but cannot find diagrams showing the placement of the parts. Thanks.
Alex
 

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Go to books.google.com and search 'car builders cyclopedia'. There will be quite a list to choose from, depending on the year range you are looking for.
 

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Ozark Miniatures sells a Westinghouse K brake kit of parts, and it includes instructions. I have attached their diagram and the photo they include. I have also included the underside of an Accucraft flatcar which was in the same stack, plus a drawing from a book. Hope it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to Pete Thornton and Armorsmith. I'm still working on figuring out the direction of forces of all the rods to the levers and brake beam levers. I am trying to run all the rods to all the brake beams and levers and some of the forces are hard to visualize.

Also, Pete, that red picture...look at the one rod coming off the lever in the lower left of the picture. Do you see the big bends in the rod? That just doesn't look right in real life. Maybe I'm being too picky for a model.

Most drawings show the rods and levers in the center of the car but don't show the workings around the brake beams and trucks. Maybe I'm suppose to be smarter...
But thanks for the help.
 

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The brake system is just a series of levers to get the brakes to function correctly. Start at the cylinder and trace to the first lever. Notice which way it moves when the cylinder moves. Now take one of the two rods coming off it and trace to the next lever. Watch which way it moves and continue until one truck is figured out.


Now go back to the first lever and trace the movement to the other truck. It really is just that simple.


Hope this helps.
 

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Also, Pete, that red picture...look at the one rod coming off the lever in the lower left of the picture. Do you see the big bends in the rod? That just doesn't look right in real life.
Tricky stuff indeed. I think if you look at the close-up attached, you'll notice the bends are in the air pipe, and the rod off the lever is truncated. The truck sits over this - the round screw bosses are for the pivot beam and Accucraft does not attempt to connect the brakes on the truck to the brake system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks again guys. I have one more question. What is the 'Live' lever and 'Dead' lever? I think they are on each truck. Thanks.
Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, Pete, I just reread your reply. Not on the thumbnail picture, but on your original picture, look to the lower left of the picture. The big bends I was referring to are in the rod right next to the push rod from the cylinder. That particular rod usually goes to the manual hand brake if I am not mistaken.
 

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Oh, Pete, I just reread your reply. Not on the thumbnail picture, but on your original picture, look to the lower left of the picture. The big bends I was referring to are in the rod right next to the push rod from the cylinder. That particular rod usually goes to the manual hand brake if I am not mistaken.
Yes - I agree that the bends wouldn't be very likely in real life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Rich (or anyone else), I did what you suggested and it appears to me (please correct me if I am wrong) that the only rod that is in compression is the push rod from the cylinder to the first lever. All other rods are in tension when brakes are applied. In other words, they all pull. Correct? And again what is the difference in a live lever and a dead lever?

Thanks,
Alex
 

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Alex,


It makes sense that the rods would be under compression. If they were under tension they would tend to stretch over time, requiring more maintenance. Under compression the problem of change of length is lessened.


This may or may not be true at the truck, however. Modern cars have the brake blocks between the wheels on the truck and they are pushed against the wheels. On older truck the brake blocks are outside the wheels and would be pulled against the wheels, thus being in tension.


Sorry to take so long in answering. I had intended to try to find a reference but did not get around to it.


Good luck.
 
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