G Scale Model Train Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need advice.  I have a new speeder and a speeder shed that I want to include on my layout.  I've noticed that when others model these structures, they always place the shed beside the mainline track with the door facing the track and the feeder track extending out from the shed perpendicular to the main line.



 


However, the tracks don't cross or there is no switch to bring the speeder out onto the main track.  Is this really the way they were configured?  Did they push the speeder out to the track and then turn it into place on the main track by hand or with a crane or something?  I noticed that one of the model companies have this set-up and the track turns under the speeder to orient it to the proper direction on the main line?  Or is there some kind of small turn table under the tracks here that comes up and moves the speeder?



Please advise if you have information about how they got speeders from the sheds to the tracks without a switch.

Thanks for your help!

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Ed,
If you look carefully at pictures of speeders and even the USA model you will see handles on the ends. Thtas it, the crew picked them up and put them on the tracks. Been there, done that, leave it for the younger guys now.

George
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
249 Posts
Like George says. Worked like a wheelbarrow. Just took good, old-fashioned muscles to wrestle in off the main and into the shed. There were usually some ties or other wooden planking in place to facilitate the process.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
5,695 Posts
I don't know for sure, but I suspect one must draw a distinction between a manual handcar and a powered speeder. The handcars were usually picked up and placed upon the rails, as was said. Also as was said, there was often (usually?) ties between the rails (sort of like a grade crossing) to make this process easier.

A powered speeder, otoh, may have been to heavy to lift. I'm not sure how these were handled. Perhaps someone will jump in here who knows for sure. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
Ed,

It depended on the speeder's size and use. Those stationed along the line for section crews were always perpendicular that I've seen. The speeders had to be light enough for someone to manhandle off the rails for oncoming trains. On the other hand in a yard area with resulting heavier traffic and where a heavier speeder might be used for inspection it might have its own switch track leading into its shed. Switches are expensive to build and to maintain so they wouldn't be used unless it was deemed appropriate.

Your question further rattled my brain, such as it is, and reminded me of seeing a very small turntable for a speeder somewhere. I didn't measure it but I doubt it was more than 6 or 8 feet long. It was definately located in the west, perhaps along the Sierra or another California shortline. I might have a photo stashed somewhere.

One thing I've learned is to never say never. You'll find a prototype for almost everything somewhere.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
Some of the bigger speeders had a hydraulic jack in the middle that could be put down to lift the whole thing so it could be rotated and then set back down and, again, by human power, shoved over the mainline rails onto the perpendicular tracks that led to the shed. Reverse the process to re-rail it on the mainline in the morning.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
470 Posts
At the California RR Museum Jamestown, they have a model A rail car that has a jack in the center that was used to rotate the car for the return trip.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
965 Posts
Here is a picture from the Durango-Silverton RR showing the Speeder track.  It is perpendicular.  I asked the Conductor how the speeder gets on/off the mainline.  He replied that the MOV personnel lift up the front, put it on the mainline, then the back.

JimC.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,334 Posts
I remember some  just being two  rail road ties  in the ground spaced the with of the  speeder wheels 

The last time I was up  in Durago   we saw a  speeder group  going up the  rails  They were stoped by the house that was used in Buch Casidy and the Sundance kid.

My  Sister and I thought it would be a great trip  to make on a speeder.   

She was thrilled with our  Goose trip. 
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
Most common term use for speeder (who ever came up with that nonsense) was motor car.  They were used for a lot of operations from maintenace crews using to haul ties and material to repair track to a lone motor car used for track inspection.  Most of the inspection cars where handled by one person.  Yes they had a crossing inbetween the rail and the car was rolled onto it and then the handles pulled out of the rear of the motor car. The car was then lifted and rotated to match the rails.  I operated one of these for years.  Fun to ride in the summer but a bummer in the cold winters of ILL./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif  Later RJD
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,510 Posts
I believe a particular model of the Fairmont Motor cars were commercially sold as "Speeders" (as in Ford Fairlane, or Chevy Malibu, etc.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,315 Posts
Posted By Ed Harvey on 03/02/2008 8:18 AM
I need advice.  I have a new speeder and a speeder shed that I want to include on my layout.  I've noticed that when others model these  . . . one of the model companies have this set-up and the track turns under the speeder to orient it to the proper direction on the main line?  Or is there some kind of small turn table under the tracks here that comes up and moves the speeder?


Never seen anything quite like that, but it sure looks like a great modern-era model piece.

"Spiffy !" 
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top