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I'd like to start weathering my rolling stock. One of the Depesche issues mentions Rustall. Micromark has it in their catalog. What's your opinion of this product.
 

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It works well. My complaint with it is you can only buy it as a over priced four bottle system. You get the bottle of Rust all, a bottle of black wash (does an okay job), a bottle of a flat wash (also okay) and a bottle of dirt (literally, its pretty worthless). Don't think I'll but the whole thing again but would buy the Rust all separately. I have been using Triangle Coatings' Sophisticated Finishes Iron and Rust (two part process). You can get them at craft stores like Micheal's or cheaper at DickBlick.com. The Rust all gives you a more scale look rust but the Sophisticated Finishes is more realistic. I just did a boxcar using a bit of both and will post a pic tomorrow.

Rust all (and some black wash) used on the Rail Tractor -




and Soph. Fin. on the tip cars -





-Brian
 

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I played with Rustall a long time ago. Never really lived up to the hype in my opinion. I've found more effective ways of doing business now, either via thin washes of paint and drybrushing (see Burl Rice's article in a recent GR), iron acetate wash (steel wool dissolved in vinegar), or Bragdon's weathering chalks.

Later,

K
 

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I use RustAll but I also use the other things that have been mentioned here. Sometimes I mix in a bit of concrete tinting powder with the RustAll to make it less red. The concrete tint is basically just iron oxide.

BTW, you can buy RustAll separately if you search around a little online.
 

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I agree with Bruce.start with india ink and alcohol..I call it "Grunge"

Grunge is my favorite thing to use...if you look at most pics in color RR books most engines are filthy....that is always the look I am looking for...that is not to say I don't have shiny engines, my passenger engines are still shiny!

Experimenting with it can prove to be very effective and surprizing in the results.

Like shooting a tank car with dul-cote first, then either pouring a coat of pure alcohol over it then brushing it off somewhat with a paintbrush when it dries, giving the entire car a dusty whit look, or pouring a mix of the Grunge giving it a real dirty look...with the grunge practice will make it better for the desired effects, you are looking for.

Start first with a car you don't mind experiminting with..The coat of Dul-cote, if you use chaulk will give the chalk bite to adhere better.
Bragdons's are my chaulk of choice..although you can buy pigments in bulk from pigment companies if you want to get larger quantities and cheaper, works the same as the Bragdon...as long as you use something like Dul-Cote for bite first.

Rustall...what's that? Almost bought some once.

MHO

Bubba
 

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I bought some stuff from Michaels by Sophisticated Finishes. It's 2 part, you paint on the base which is like ground iron or steel then after it dries you apply the rusting agent. The surface is quite coarse. I've used it on truss rods, bolt heads, nuts, shackles. I like it though it may not work every where. Anyone else used this?
 

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I have used that stuff extensively..the same way you have also...it is also expensive. You can go to the web site and buy larger bottles of both the iron and the blue solution....again it is more expensive.

What I found out using it that is a by product of the rusting process is that when the blue solution dries it leaves a whitish stain where the solution dried after application....it has been a boon for weathering my stuff as it looks like a more realistic side effect that evne brings out the weathering even more realisticly.

Or you can whipe it off, but I prefur to leave it on.

It is very easy to get a little carried away using it, and brush strokes and such take a little practice to get a realistic look after the rust appears. But expirimentation is well worth the effects achieved.

Bubba
 

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Posted By chrisb on 11/17/2008 8:05 AM
I bought some stuff from Michaels by Sophisticated Finishes. It's 2 part, you paint on the base which is like ground iron or steel then after it dries you apply the rusting agent. The surface is quite coarse. I've used it on truss rods, bolt heads, nuts, shackles. I like it though it may not work every where. Anyone else used this?





No, nobody here.



-Brian
 

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Many eons ago I purchased Grumbachers's Tubes of Hyplar Acrylic Artiists colors in Red Iron Oxide (rust), Yellow Ocher, Burnt Umber, Lamp Black, etc. I mix a dab of these with a drop of liquid detergent in various volumes of water and use them as washes for weathering. Once dry they don't come off with handleing. The red iron oxide makes great rust especially when you prepare the object with a little degergent and water then apply the rust wash.
Noel
 
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