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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard various reports about using Dull coat on a live steamer. Some have said it works fine, and others claim it will turn green at the first application of heat. Well, I was tired of the glossy black paint job as supplied by Accucraft, so I scrubbed the shay clean with simple green, dried her off, and gave her a nice coat or two of dull coat. The results were impressive:



Here is a close up showing the smoke box door:





I had planned to do more weathering before running, but decided first find out if she was going to turn green. Here are the results after one run with the fire roaring away more than normal:




As you can see, the smoke box and stack look as before. The number plate is a bit frosted over, but no signs of green. It is a bit hard to see in photos, but at this point she doesn't look any different than most Accucrafts that have seen many runs. I"ll try a few more runs and report back, but thus far the dull coat looks promising. Guess I'll have to get busy detailing and weathering soon.....


Mark
 

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I have a Roundhouse Sandy River (old style) that I have always wished had a dull finish instead of a shiny one. Did you just scrub the engine down in a sink and then blow dry (hair blow drier)? Did it matter if you got dull coat on drivers and running gear? This sounds like a good idea to me.
 

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Some time back, I had a bad experience with cars that had been oversprayed with Testers Dullcote. When they got caught in the rain, it turned milky and started to flake off. I rubbed them with a Scotchbrite pad and recoated with Krylon #1311 Matte Finish Clear, which stated it is non-yellowing and moisture resistant. I also detailed and repainted my Accucraft 3-cylinder Shay with Krylon black, with an overcoat of the same matte clearcoat. All have been in service for a couple of years now, and caught again in a heavy rain, with no ill effects. Except, the dry transfer number on the smokebox numberplate covered with the clear Krylon, has turned toast-brown. Perhaps it was the transfer that is heat sensitive?

I am getting close to repainting another live steamer, and intend to use the same Krylon paint and clearcoat.

I no longer use the Testors Dullcote--it does not seem suitible for live steam/outdoor service.


Larry
 

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thus far the dull coat looks promising


Mark,
The problem is coming soon. Apart from the heat issue, Dullcote isn't UV protected, so it turns yellowy/green after exposure to sunlight and peels off. I understand there is a Krylon matt spray that is designed for outdoor use, but I don't know anyone who has tried it on a steamer.

Did you just scrub the engine down


Steve,
Someone mentioned using a new 'Extreme Simple Green' Degreaser. I found some in Home Depot and can report that it works great. Spray the loco (or part of it,) let it sit a few minutes, then rinse.
 

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To date I have not tried dull coat it on My LS but have use it on a number of my sparkies and quite a few cars with good results. Later RJD
 

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Pete--the Krylon #1311 Matte Finish Clear is what I have had excellent results with, so far.

Steve--aside from not using Testors Dullcote, as being discussed here, the working parts-gears, transmission shafts, engine rods and crossheads, and such should not be painted. The lubricants and movement will cause paint to lift and peel, leaving a messy situation. On my Shay, and the Roundhouse ex-SR 24 that I am modifying, I use Neolube, a graphite suspension in alcohol (available from Micro-Mark) on these areas. This product is designed as a dry lubricant on moving machinery and small parts.I still use grease and oil on my Shay machinery, since the primary purpose of the Neolube here is to darken the bright mechanical parts left unpainted at the factory. Also painted it on the smokebox and stack to cover the bright silver. When it wears off, I recoat the Shay about once a year. If you don't like it, just wash it off with alcoho. l BTW: in steam days many railroads coated the smokeboxes of their steam engines with graphite, I believe because paint would burn off.
 

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When the Aster Berkshire came out about two years ago, I ordered an unlettered kit and converted the loco to a model of the C&O Kanawha. My choice of paints was Scalecoat I. This paint is baked at 175 degrees to cure it. I used their Black and both gloss and flat glaze products. With the proper baking, the glazes and the paint have been impervious to oil, water, alcohol, and even WD-40 which I use in my afterrun clean-up process. They've held up to regular steam-ups and two trips to DH. I would highly recommend them. You can get them either in a spray can or bottles. Don't accidentally buy Scalecoat II; that's for plastics.

Good luck,

Ross Schlabach
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was unaware Krylon or Scalecoat made a mat clear coat (i.e. Dull coat equivalent). I have used other Krylon and Scalecoat paints in the past with good results, so I will certainly look for those products in the future. Other than the shay, I have used the Testers Dull coat on a few buildings and pieces of rolling stock. All of my equipment stays indoors and is only outside for runs - thus far I have not noticed any UV degradation - hopefully this will remain the case. Going forward I'll certainly use the Scalecoat or Krylon products.

Thanks,
Mark
 
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