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Discussion Starter #81
The insulation is mainly to keep the heat in but it does help prevent burns too.
 

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Wow! A True Artist, I always look forward to your next creation.
Beautiful work.
Thanks for sharing.
John
 

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Bill

You are certainly popular with train crew having designed the cab with a "fireplace" probably with two comfortable arm chairs in the cab along with hot chocolate. That design of the firebox door reminds me of the coal stove at home. We placed a some window onto the CP Hudson coal fired-nice effect!
 

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Very nice Bill! They are not just engineering marvels but artworks as well! But it is not the next ones I look forward to seeing (yet) but these gems!
 

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Discussion Starter #86

I started the cabs by taping together the scale drawings from the front and side views. I then made a pattern out of 1/4" MDF and finally cut the pieces out on the router table



The door was also cut on the router. The panel groves were done on the mill with a counter sink bit. The bunker was also cut from the scale drawings

The rear of the bunker on the prototype was made in sections so I did the same.

The original had a complicated fire box and grate design so I decides to make the bottom with a separate piece and insulate the firebox.
Again, the scale drawing helped out

I soldered the piece on to the boiler wrap. The seam is partially hidden bu the side tanks

Here is the ash pan lever per the drawing above

This engine had huge steam pipes which scale out to 3/8". here I have drilled the holes in the smoke box to receive the pipes.


The fitting on the left goes in the smoke box, next is the bottom of the flange with the o-ring and next is the top of the flange. The raised portion in the middle is to center the elbow for silver soldering.
The elbow is from Mc Master. it is made for sweating but I cut off the bell mouth ends to get a smooth transition to the pipe on the rt.

Here is the top of the flange which is set in the hole in the smoke box

Here is the bottom of the flange inside the smoke box the thread is 5 mm.
 

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Every time I check back to this thread, I have to take a moment beforehand to tie my jaw securely shut so that it doesn't get bruised hitting the floor. Incredible.
 

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Yes, this is such an inspiration. Thanks for posting the progress.

It makes me think of how the original locomotives must have been built, one at a time by hand, and therefore how similar the model is, not only in appearance but in the thought and execution of each component.
 

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Bill, where did you get the mica from, that's a nice touch!
 

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Discussion Starter #90
Dave
I got it from my friend Dennis who bought it on eBay. The mica was his idea
 

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Thank you Bill for adding where you downloaded that program of Charlie Dockstader's will help me alot!
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Well, I have been working hard since my last posting

Here the elbow is silver soldered to the flange and the tempered copper tube

The tube is bent to shape and the bottom section is soldered to the flange for the cylinder mounting. The connection elbow is left uncut as the original had a similar connection.
As this is the exhaust, I will soft solder the elbow in place to get perfect alignment.

The front exhaust will tee off this connection. The o-ring is necessary only for alignment as once mounted, there will be no motion in the joint

The steam pressure fitting goes into the side of the valves and again the o-ring is just for alignment and to insure there is never any strain on the fitting

Here the exhaust tubes are mounted and you can see where the one on the left has been soldered in olace and the one on the right is yet to be done

Side view of the pipes. The right steam pipe feeds the front engine and the left one feeds the rear one

Steam pipe with silver soldered flange and elbow.

here are the components of the dog bone connection. I got these dimensions from Charles and modified them slightly for this application.
The tube at the top will go to the lubricator the bottom right fitting will be silver soldered to the pipe going to the cylinder

Here the assembly shows the movement possible which is way more than it will ever see in use.

Now for the part I have been thinking about how to do for a long time. The side tanks
The exhaust pipes go down between the boiler and the tanks so there needs to be some relief for them on the inside of the tanks.
I took some K&S tubing and split it in two but it was too thin to work so I took some of the .032" material I used for the tanks and annealed it.
I then drew lines across it to keep it square and bent it around a dowel in the vise.

I then silver soldered it to the tank side cutout and then on the table saw cut off table, I cut out the bridge piece.

Here are the inside and outside pieces ready to go together.

The right side tank has a step down which I silver soldered prior to tank assembly because I was afraid that the soldering of the tank might melt soft solder
The clip I use here is cut from coat hanger wire and works great, You can bend it to any shape or tension and use it over and over again.

The tanks are soldered up. you can see the step on the top left.

The cab gets fitted for a roof and some side window and grab handle detail is added. Still need some detail on the front windows.

00-90 screws are almost too big but they do the job on the grab handles.

Here she is so far. Starting to look like the real thing.
 

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Bill

When we start in "G" gauge this was one of our favorite. Always want one in live steam but....you are building our dream and the reality is I doubt anyone else could reach the excellence you have put forth. Atleast we will get to see it in action at NSS!
 

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What an awesome locomotive, and amazing building you do.

I have always wished Accucraft would manufacture this locomotive with either the saddle tank or tender versions available.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
Thanks for the compliments.
This has been a challenging project and it is nice to see that others think it is worth the effort.
 

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Had the plan to build the uintah as well,bought 3 Aristocraft live steamers to use the drive gear and various other parts ,i stalled when you started building the 2-6-6-2 (i needed to buy a lathe and a whole bunch of tools to continue on) so i enjoyed watching your buildup ,its a real joy to see all those technical difficulty's solved withe ease,the only problem i see are the servo activated valve gears,i think the aristo type activated valve gears would work more reliable ,of course they needed to be bashed so they work with regular RC control! (a poti and a couple resistors should take care of it)

Great work,Bill

Manfred
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Yes
I noticed the Aristo's have what looks like a servo activated screw mechanism. Probably would be an upgrade.
Why did you buy three?
 

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I actually have 4 Aristo LV steamers /one as is/2 for the Uintah/# 4 bashed to a 20.3 scale

The aristo set motors have internal down gearing and quite some torque ,those motors are commercially available and hacking 2 larger servos (need to be 12volt servos) (using the servo electronics with the new motors) will be perfect for setting the valves with RC Sliders!

Manfred

i do have a set of 7 1/2 scale plans for building the uintah 2-6-6-2 ,if someone wants to build one e-mail me!
 

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Discussion Starter #99
The next step is turning the stack and domes. For that I need to go to Dennis' where we can use his 15" lathe and heavy duty mill


The taper of 1.5 degrees is turned and the bore of 19/32" is drilled out

At home a wood dowel is turned to make a mandrel and the stack top detail is formed using a file and a scraper. The base is formed by cutting an .080 washer from a 1' bar
and then annealing and bending to the smoke box shape. 1/32" rivets will fill the holes

The boring bar is set to the boiler wrap radius and the dome material is cut to fit, The steam domes are 1-3/4" and the sand dome is 1-1/2"

Here is the mill in action doing the finish cut

I made a curvature template from brass using photos and the scale drawings to get it right. Here Dennis is roughing it out with a small bull nose bit

Then the final curve is done with a file

Here are the three domes set on the boiler

The steam supply lines were completed this week.
It is hard to show the flow as it is mostly between the frames but here is a good shot of the dog bone.
Clamps have been added to both sides of the fitting to eliminate movement in the tubing which could cause cracks after a long time

At the bottom on either side of the dog bone are the large tubes that come from the smoke box. 1/4"-40 fittings connect the 5/32" tubing which curves around to get the right orentation.
The left tube feeds the rear (top of the photo) cylinders and the one on the right goes to the dog bone which goes to the front (articulated) engine

Here is a shot showing the fittings for the lubricator lines at the bottom of the photo as well as the rear engine supply line

Here are the components for a small and simple hand pump. This needs to be small as the side tank is only 1-1/2" wide.
There will be two check valves which are exactly the same. The only difference is where they will be connected. There is a hole about 1/2 of the way up which wasn't drilled in this photo.
The cap has a rod turned in it to keep the check ball in place. The gap there should be approximately 1/6 the ball diameter.
After the ball is seated, I put it in the valve body and with a depth gauge measure the distance down and cut the cap rod accordingly.
The cylinder is similar to the axle pump design

Here is the assembly. You can see how the check valves are attached. The brass plate at the bottom will be soldered to the bottom of the side tank.
The tube fitting goes through the tank bottom and is secures on the other side with a thin nut. it is sealed with silicone.

Here it is mounted in the side tank. It is removable by removing the four 2-56 SS screws and the one fitting.
This pump will be in series with the axle pump and will be able to prime the axle pump if the system runs dry

Here is how the valves fit in. The barrier is just a baffle to keep water from sloshing around.
 
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