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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This project has been several years in the planning, but I am pleased to say that I now have a working prototype.

Several years ago I was bitten by the live steam bug and decided to try my hand at running finger burners on my Addledoo Bush Tramway. There were a few second-hand locos on ebay, but none of them were in my price range. Members on “Large Scale Central” forum pointed me in the direction of a the Regner line and I purchased a Lumberjack kit from a French dealer. Being a little impatient to get something on the rails while waiting for my Lumberjack to arrive, I tinkered with the bones of a Mamod TE1A and built my Bushy#1. It became a bit of an obsession, even after the LJ arrived, but after several upgrades, it now runs pretty well.

Bush Loco #1
Window Motor vehicle Rolling stock Building Wood

Bush Loco #1 Model Steam Forum posts
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoX5GbMAvI3aVzQwI4cx9-a7oktNrvqDM

Bush Loco #2
While researching Bushy#1, I came across another image of a "Bush Loco" on Pinterest which took my fancy. (The original website is still a mystery.)
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Auto part Gas

Coal-fired vertical boiler logging locomotive | Logging industry, Locomotive, Old trains

As you can see, this bush loco has twin boilers, a geared drive and stands about 3 people high to the top of the chimney.
I had been gathering parts for several years and thought I had boilers for it (Weedens), but when I came to fit them on the “deck”, they took up too much real estate. I had to source smaller boilers.
Fortunately, Walter on the Oz/NZ “model toy steam forum”, happened to have a couple of beaten up old small European boilers in his box of useful bits. After repairing all the holes they eventually stopped leaking and I could move on with the build.
I was still uncertain how the boilers would work in unison, if there would be sufficient steam for the motor or if the motor would even have enough power to drive the loco.

Here is a link to the build featuring a video of the most recent track test with the new gearing.
The Model and Toy Steam Engine Forum-Addledoo Bush Loco #2

Its alive!!
To be continued...
 

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It could make a interesting addition to a logging-themed layout. Oak might work outside. Found an interesting tidbit:

c.1594 – The first overground railway line in England may have been a wooden-railed, horse-drawn tramroad which was built at Prescot, near Liverpool, around 1600 and possibly as early as 1594. Owned by Philip Layton, the line carried coal from a pit near Prescot Hall to a terminus about half a mile away.

I imagine the next innovation was to attach iron strips to the rail tops. Fascinating stuff.
 

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They were called "Pole Roads." Used quite a lot in the logging industry early on. In fact, if my memory is correct, one of Ephram Shay's early logging rail roads was a pole road in Michigan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Log rails were quite common in Australia and New Zealand on "Timber Getting" tramways in the early days. (Canada/US as well I think) The rails were more cost effective to build and relocate. If you needed more rails you just milled some more!
I was also reading that some logging tramways didnt even bother with skeleton cars. They just chained the logs together behind the loco's and dragged them between the rails.

A good reference book if you can find it. The Era of the Bush Tram in New Zealand: Mahoney, Paul: 9780908876280: Amazon.com: Books
Train Plant Vehicle Font Book


And another interesting read...
Australian and New Zealand Logging Tramways - Differences from North American Practice
https://www.lrrsa.org.au/log_diff.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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The picture of the 2 boilered bush loco is on page 26 of "Railroads in the Woods" by Labbe and Goe.
The picture is dated approximately 1906 at the Ghan Wilson sawmill in Hudson near Rainier, Oregon, USA
I have several of Labbe's books. They have wonderful pictures of old scenes.
Dan
 

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Rob,
Congratulations on a great build.
So nice to see others making good use of Meccano pieces.
One of the greatest inventions of 'our' time.
All the best,
David Leech, Delta, Canada
 
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