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Discussion Starter #1
So if i wanted to put in a sideline alongside my mainline and using USA #6 switches im a bit confused on what dia curve you use to turn the track back so its running parallel with the main...make sense?

after the switch (right side for line on inside of clockwise running oval) which is a 4' dia, what dia curve is needed ? a 4"?

then to run the sideline back into the main do i need the opposite direction turnout?

thank you
 

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1/2 of one piece of curved track, For instance if your switch is a 4' diameter turnout then you will need half of a 4' piece of curved track not a 2' curve, actually either cut a 4' curve in half or buy one for this issue. And you will need a right hand switch and a left hand switch or turnout  to complete the siding back to the mainline. Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks bud, thats a huge help. i didnt realize that the ,not sure what that peice of track is called, track needed for that is sold, i was kind of thinking id need to maybe cut something. knowing its half of a matching diameter track is a big help. thanks
 

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It's not quite that simple. The answer lies in the arc the switch makes. The diverging leg of a #6 switch comes off at almost 10°, so to bring the track back parallel, you'd need to cut a curved section of track to an equal 10° arc, laying it in the opposite direction. Radius does not matter, but--obviously--you'd want to pick a section of track with a radius as close to the switch's rough radius as possible. Numbered switches don't have a "radius" since the diverging route isn't a continuous curve. It straightens out at the frog. A rough approximation for the "radius"--and I'm using that only in quotes--is around 9', so a section of 10' radius (20' diameter) curve would be fairly consistent with the curve of the switch.

If you're using LGB's R1 or R3 curved switches (or USA/Aristo 2' radius switches), the divergent leg is equal to one complete section of their respective curve sections. So, to bring the track back parallel with either of those switches, you'd need a complete section laid in the opposite direction of the switch. Note that Aristo's 5' radius switch is NOT equal to one section of their 5' radius track. It might be half, but I'm not sure.

Later,

K
 

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Jason,

I've seen examples of a very simple, but expensive, solution of using two switches back to back. Connect the divergent legs and the result is two parallel tracks.

Dave
 

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After trying to put an answer & questions, in this topic 3 times in the "Add Reply".................
I forgot what the **** I wanted to know................!! :cool:

I sure hope all the glitches get worked out soon........
It would be nice to participate in this place............

and I have absolutly no idea if I'm subscribed to this topis or not...............
 
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