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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don’t operate my trains very fast on my outdoor layout. I use Kadee 831 couplers and metal wheels on all my cars and the coupler heights are gauged. The cars involved run with similar cars of length, height, and weight. My consists are mostly 8-10 cars. The smaller the consist the less likely this happens. I run heaviest to lightest on pretty level road, however, the lighted Aristo cabeese have some drag due to the wheel brushes. I use brass track which is a pain to keep clean, but I try before each session. The derailments always occur on level curved areas. The rails and tie plates are in pretty good condition. I’m pretty puzzled here folks!

Thanks…Rich
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It’s a dog bone, 50’ straightaways with a 3/4 loop of R1 on one end and 3/4 loop of R2 on the other. The problem Childs are (2) 40’ boxes (USA Trains and LGB, medium weight), and the LGB Beatle Express flat with 2 diecast VW’s, which is heavy. I’m beginning to think it may be due to power through the wheels vs. contact shoe engines. The engines with wheel power have a tendency to stutter at times which may cause stringining where the contact shoe engines run pretty steady. I don’t run longer cars because of the smallish radiuses. This will happen on the straightaways also. I’ll try different engines. I tend to run my “go to” engines most of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It’s pretty level. I don’t have much problem running my 2-4-2 Ruby, tender. and 3 AMS coal genneys. Radio control is a necessity in a couple spots. The entire layout is on the ground and ballasted with chicken grit. The brass track is 20 years old. The rails still gauge properly, however there are mild dips where the sun has molded it to the terrain. Although I routinely clean the track, for the most part I’ve never cleaned the split jaw joiners.

I really appreciate the responses. My question is probably tough to answer site unseen. I will respond if I find the problem.

Thanks so much…Rich
 

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With R1 curves and the drag of the caboose, stringlining is to be expected.

1. check the gauge of all wheels
2. I'm guessing all truck mounted couplers, make sure trucks swivel easily under pressure
3. lube the axle journals and then push each car down the track and see how long they coast
4. replace the axles with carbon brushes on the caboose with ball bearing wheels with power pickup wheelsets(LGB or Train-Li wheels)
5. put a level ACROSS the rails to make sure it is flat in that direction.


Greg
 

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With R1 curves and the drag of the caboose, stringlining is to be expected.

5. put a level ACROSS the rails to make sure it is flat in that direction.


Greg
Probably the most likely cause. I had this issue with some home built wagons - most were fine but one, with a slightly longer wheelbase, kept derailing. It turned out to be a slight bulge on the inner rail in a corner. In addition to what Greg suggests, try to view it from track level - a slight bulge across is very difficult to see looking down on the track. Obviously a little more challenging if the track is ground level but it should give you an idea of where to check with a level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Found the problem, well, Greg did. I never used a level crosswise and now I have a lot of work to do. Zephra, I just read your post and you are right about viewing from ground level. I found a couple of short but deep dips on one side of the track while the other side was good, not sure how that even happens. We have deer that eat my wife’s flowers, which may be the culprits. All my cabeese have the spring loaded wheel brushes so a ran a train very slow (without a caboose) and was surprised how the boxcars swayed to one side. Added a caboose and derailments occurred even at slow speed. So stringinling was also a cause.

I appreciate your detailed help with resolving this problem!

Thanks so much…Rich
 

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Glad you found it... it's hard to see, but the key is that our models do not have the suspension that the real thing does, so even huge flanges cannot solve everything. AML used to have inexpensive ball bearing wheel sets, I am in the process of swapping out all the carbon brushes on a 10 car USAT heavyweight train, massive stringlining, so much rolling resistance.

Greg
 
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