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Nick,
At my parents house which was built in the early 50's, there were eve vents, but nothing else. We found that there was a problem with some plastics melting on some items (mostly Christmas decorations). When they had the roof replaced several years ago, I talked them into adding a ridge vent and soffit vents during the project. They also added a thermostat controlled fan (which just moves the air when it hits a preset temp).
Since the additions, they haven't had any problems with things melting (which now include some trains that are stored up there).
They live in MD, so the summer temps can get quite warm.

I think the insulation idea is a great one, and the truss vents can be purchased at any home improvement store (we installed them when my wife and I built our room addition).

Good luck
 

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ive been reading and im one that thinks strong extremes are potentially harmful -to plastic, lube, and even other components such as wire and the fibreboard or cardboard /paper portions of certain electrical components, even some paint/ink may craze -it does dry things out eventually
of course a day or a week might be ok/tolerable-maybe even longer if the temps did go not too high-
for electircal or more delciate things like muscial insturments i usually use the rule -if it too hot or cold for a human-then its not ok-
id just consider how unhappy youll be if your collection is damaged-and the cost and time of repair-IF you can
i have an insulated attic with 2 large thermo fans and vents -(and a concrete roof here in CO, with a large portion shaded by a huge maple tree
-tis hotter n **** up in my attic on a summer day even with both fans blowing and all the vents-id never put anything other than metal or something i was willing to see destroyed up there-
plus later in the year there might be critters
and some of em eat anything
 

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Pure silica glass melts at a temperature of some 1600 deg C or 2900 deg. F. Assuming the marbles were not pure silica but rather had some admixtures (flux) the softening point would still be beyond 2000 deg. F. Before this temperature was reached the entire house would long have spontaeously combusted.

My guess is the "glass" marbles were in fact a form of hard plastic and this plastic softened and deformed in the 125-150 deg F range.
 

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Again posts on speculation that there may be problems, but none saying "I stored something up there and it failed".

I guess our over ten years of storing stuff in attics (not just trains either but other model kits) without problems in TN (95 here today BTW) must be bogus?

And the only "lube dry out" problem I have had on an LGB piece is one that sits on display in the family room which is 68 in summer and 72 in winter.....
 

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Posted By Spule 4 on 07/28/2008 3:29 PM
Again posts on speculation that there may be problems, but none saying "I stored something up there and it failed".
I guess our over ten years of storing stuff in attics (not just trains either but other model kits) without problems in TN (95 here today BTW) must be bogus?
And the only "lube dry out" problem I have had on an LGB piece is one that sits on display in the family room which is 68 in summer and 72 in winter.....




well most folks admitted it WAS only speculation


if your giving a guarantee

ill try it
 

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Experience? Do I have real experience. /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/sick.gif


I've stored for long periods in the following (from worst to best):


1. Ribbed steel bolt together 8x8 yard shed (4yr, '01-04), Sonoma, CA (southern exposure) - a true oven.


2. Attic: 1970 (built) garage attic (10yr, 1990(bought)-'00) Uninsulated, comp. roof, Sunnyvale, CA (southern exposure, no shade) - very hot, baked anything.


3. Attic: 1985 (custom built) garage attic (5 years) '85-00) Uninsulated, comp. roof, Sacramento, CA (southern exposure, no shade) - very hot, baked anything.


4. Tuff Shed (10x12 wood frame, T-111 siding (uninsulated)), 4yr, '04-08, Sonoma, CA, (middle of open lot, no shade) Better than metal shed having rafter and gable vents, but still hot.


5. Insulated storage locker 10x25 (built '97), (3 yrs, '98-01) (store furniture, household, trains, etc., during house build), Sonoma, CA (back to back row units, steel roll-up door northern exposure - kept the storage from heating through sun baked steel door.) Stayed reasonable temp on hot days.


6. Attic: 2001 (custom built) garage attic ('01-to date). 20x35 detached garage, 2x6 walls R20+ cellulose insulated & R30+ flat ceiling (fiberglass bats), sheet rocked & painted. Insulated roll up 4 panel (typ.) door (northern exposure. Attic storage: 20x17, ext. & pony walls: 3ea.x1"=R20+ rigid foam panels (R7/in", foil-faced Poly-board); ceiling/rafters 4ea.x1"=R28 (same foam board), sheet rocked and painted. (to building codes; florescent lights, electrical and fire sprinklers


No, I did not learn from my (#3) '85-90 attic experience storing stuff in another uninsulated attic '90-00 (#4). But the third time is the charm and our current house my garage attic is perfect, maybe gets to 80 on a 100+ day. Same day, I can walk into the garage in mid afternoon and it's barely 70 degrees, and in the mornings it's downright cold (temp drops to 50s overnight in the summer here.) The insulated attic essentially double insulates the garage itself. Makes working in my garage shop very pleasant in the hot summer or cold winter with a small space heater.


From experience... ONLY #5 or #6 were/are safe. Anything in an uninsulated attic exposed to temperature extremes will be cooked, and very well done. I used to collect old LGB and bought lots off eBay. Whenever anyone wrote telling me the item was/had been stored in their attic (house or garage), and after the first several times the item always arriving w/faded box, often red gloss paper peeling, box sleeve warped, yellowed cellophane, and sometimes wheel axles (or other parts) warped, after that I always avoided or canceled buys from attic storage. I have suffered through baked Christmas ornaments, disintegrated carpets, warped 33rpm records, among numerous other ruined items.


I hope some can benefit from my bad and good experiences. But I suppose that is just speculation. ;) :) :rolleyes:
 

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Posted By Chris Scott on 07/30/2008 6:39 PM
Experience? Do I have real experience.

From experience... ONLY #5 or #6 were/are safe. Anything in an uninsulated attic exposed to temperature extremes will be cooked, and very well done. I used to collect old LGB and bought lots off eBay. Whenever anyone wrote telling me the item was/had been stored in their attic (house or garage), and after the first several times the item always arriving w/faded box, often red gloss paper peeling, box sleeve warped, yellowed cellophane, and sometimes wheel axles (or other parts) warped, after that I always avoided or canceled buys from attic storage.




Interesting on the yellowed windows in boxes. I got some NIB 1980s LGB that had yellowed windows, UV as they sat in a shop window. The attic boxes are still clear. Basement boxes from Yankeeland are sometimes bad news due to the smell/and sometimes mold/moisture damage.

Never had any problems with the Luran plastic, it's primary function is automotive applications. And last time I checked LGB axels are steel?
 

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Posted By Spule 4 on 08/02/2008 12:19 PM
Posted By Chris Scott on 07/30/2008 6:39 PM
Experience? Do I have real experience.
From experience... ONLY #5 or #6 were/are safe. Anything in an uninsulated attic exposed to temperature extremes will be cooked, and very well done. I used to collect old LGB and bought lots off eBay. Whenever anyone wrote telling me the item was/had been stored in their attic (house or garage), and after the first several times the item always arriving w/faded box, often red gloss paper peeling, box sleeve warped, yellowed cellophane, and sometimes wheel axles (or other parts) warped, after that I always avoided or canceled buys from attic storage.


Interesting on the yellowed windows in boxes. I got some NIB 1980s LGB that had yellowed windows, UV as they sat in a shop window. The attic boxes are still clear. Basement boxes from Yankeeland are sometimes bad news due to the smell/and sometimes mold/moisture damage.
Never had any problems with the Luran plastic, it's primary function is automotive applications. And last time I checked LGB axels are steel?




I have not opened or been near my LGB stuff in 10 or 11 years since being infected with Live Steam (oh, and having to move all that LGB stuff - twice. So memory being what it is I probably have forgotten more than I knew on LGB mechanicals. Yellow or not windows? I mostly just remember attic dust and dirt; the windows dirty, brittle, and the glue brakedown (detached windows) from temp extremes.

Of course. a lot depends on how your trains are stored in a shed or attic. Whether they are in larger cardboard cartons or loose.

Soil conditions typically prevent basements in California, except for maybe the occasional wine cellar at least here Northern California(but the construction costs are quite expensive). It's easier to build a temp controlled/humidity room/closet inside the house or buy a specialty refrig.

:)
 
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