G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone used Tite-Bond III glue on any outdoor structures made of wood.  Bridges, trestles or buildings.  I am starting a new trestle shortly and have used TB II with great success.  Any information pro or con on TB III would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
258 Posts
I'm a big fan of TB III for all my woodworking projects.  It is reputed to be more water resistant than TB II, so it should hold up better than TB II outdoors.  That said, it's still not completely waterproof...


But the thing I really like about TB III is the longer working time before it begins to set up.  This allows me to glue up more complicated subassemblies.


Dawg /Providers/HtmlEditorProviders/Fck/FCKeditor/editor/images/smiley/msn/shades_smile.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
I think its still pretty new for any long term reliability. I have been using it for the past year for exposed glue joints.

-Brian
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
226 Posts
Jim,
Tite-Bond III has only been out for a couple of years.

Chuck, I've had Tite-bond II buildings outside for many years and the glue has held up great. I do seal my my buildings, making sure that the glue joints are covered. It is by far my favorite glue for wood. I have switched over to Tite-bond III and have seen no problem in my newer structures. I do pin or dowel joints where I have end grains butted up to a cross grain.

I've had much better luck with my wooden structures than I have had with my original plastic structures
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
When I was a cabinet maker the only glues rated for outdoor use were those that had to be mixed. This was 16 years ago, but I would be surpised that any premixed wood glue would be able to stand up to the rigors of outdoor humidity changes.
We used to use two types of outdoor glue. I can't remember their product names (16 years and a career change have erased them from my memory) but one came in a plastic tub and used water as the catalyst. It was a resin that worked well with most woods except teak. For teak we used this two part black epoxy that smelled bad. Both glues could be totally submerged in water and the wood would disintegrate leaving only the resin between the joint.
Use to be that tightbond and any premixed wood glue would start to breakdown when subjected to long term exposure to water.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1 Posts
Titebond III is water submersable rated.  That is you can put in water after it cures and it stays put.


 


Technically it passes ANSI/HPVA Type I Specification for water proof glues.


 


I used it to glue up a turntable PIt nearly three years ago and it still is holding up nicely inspite of having the pit buried in the ground and filled with water every time it rains (all of July and Most of August.:D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
Posted By nbuchholz on 01/03/2008 3:30 PM


Titebond III is water submersable rated.  That is you can put in water after it cures and it stays put.


 


Technically it passes ANSI/HPVA Type I Specification for water proof glues.


 


 


Does it bond well with teak? Not hat I'd use teak on a largescale project,,,, just professional curiousity.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the great information guys. I'm picking some up this weekend. Here in Colorado our humdity averages about 18% but snow is another issue. Right now my elevated railroad is covered in about 4' of the white stuff. Just as long as brads and glue hold up the new trestle should work out fine. I'm glad to hear TB III is sumersible in water after drying and that it is a lighter in color than TB II. Thanks again for all the wonderful information.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
John, TB II is still available here in Colorado the last time I was in Home Depot. Are local Ace Hardware also still carrys it. I'm going to take a leap of faith here and say it is still in the product line. For at least this week anyway!. LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
143 Posts
Both Titebond II and Titebond III are available, but some stores like Home Depot only carry one of them, usually Titebond II. Titebond III is available where the store caters to folks who know and care about the difference between "water resistant" and "waterproof".

There is a significant difference in the working time between the two. I am currently building a full scale wooden mockup of a remote controlled vehicle and am using Titebond II since I like the longer working times, don't require "waterproof" and want to save a little money. Same applies to the Bronson-Tate model of SPCRR caboose #47 that I just received. While it will operate outdoors on the railroad in all kinds of weather, it will normally be stored inside, so does not need to be "waterproof".

I have some bridge abutments built using Titebond III that have been out in our N. California coastal weather for almost two years and they do not show any signs of deterioration of the glue joints. I am currently assembling a wooden bridge structure with Titebond III and fully expect that it will outlive me.

The bottom line on adhesives is that the application, type of consruction and end use should be considered when selecting the type to use.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,094 Posts
Several of the garden railroaders here in San Diego have switched to using Titebond III diluted with water as a ballast glue...and are reporting it works VERY well keeping ballast down...even when wet daily from lawn sprinklers. It's not cracking like the Titebond II did in the same application.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,094 Posts
Several of the garden railroaders here in San Diego have switched to using Titebond III diluted with water as a ballast glue...and are reporting it works VERY well keeping ballast down...even when wet daily from lawn sprinklers. It's not cracking like the Titebond II did in the same application.
 

·
Old Senior Member
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
We have built  trestles, building and bridges with Tilebond III for the last few yrs.. and holds up great here with the watering, cold and heat  we have.. We seal all structures before putting out in yard so that may help to..   Don't use Tilebond II for outside as we found it will not last.
Here is a pic. of a Grist mill that we  used broken up floor tiles and  bond to teated plywood then grout. 





Finished Mill..


http://1stclass.mylargescale.com/noelw/Grist%20Mill/Finish%20Mill.jpg 


Not pushing the product ,but Tilebond III is Good sutff and dosen't  take much of it to get a good bond.. Like on trestles beams,  just a drop and clamp.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
153 Posts
Any issues with TBIII and painted wood surfaces? I'm assembling a home-made water tower, and I've already painted the tank and am starting on the roof. I don't want to sand unless necessary. Thanks for realting any firsthand experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
631 Posts
I have had good results with TB III. My lumber mill has been outside for 8 months now with no detrimental effects. The corners were all "painted" (really stained) prior to glue and nailed. I would say, it depends upon what you painted with. Some paints and stains are oil based and soak into the wood itself. Some latex paints tend to form a surface film which could pull loose. I would think this could affect any joint regardless of glue. I am no expert on paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
I use Tightbond III and really like it..BUT...read carefully. It is NOT for submersion in water!


Under "UER TIPS" it says this.. "Clamp time dependent on environmental conditions. Not for continuous submersion or for use below the waterline. Not for structural or load bearing applications."


I have several structures outside and have had no problem with rain causing problems, but they have only been there for about 1 year. I did have a few joints give way with 5 minute epoxy, but I had also used Thompson's Water seal, and I believe the oils soaked through the thin cedar and contributed to the joint failure.


I know what Richard is talking about with the water mixed resin, as I used that in making spear guns and boat building in high school, but that was so long ago I can't remember what it was called either. A few years ago, I spent 3 years building and restoring boats and we used the "West System Epoxy". It is excellent, but a little too expensive for use in models unless you get their test kit. 3M also puts out an excellent system, probably equal to the "West System" and has a test kit too. Understand, these are for professional use and have several different drying speeds, along with different materials to add, such as micro balloons and different fibers, depending on the use. The minimum amounts you have to buy, make it cost preventive for our use. Also, the fumes are dangerous to use in confined spaces without proper gear, when mixing and applying.


 


 
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top