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A friend of mine showed me this page just today. It's a nice narrow gauge 2-8-0 on display in Wisconsin.... unfortunately I don't have another Aristo c-16 to bash, but I thought I'd share in case someone else wants to mangle one. also unfortunately, the pics are waaaay "too big" to simply post here....



http://www.pbase.com/gallon/no_5_details
 

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From another webpage on the loco "#5 was completed by Baldwin (Baldwin #58530) in August, 1925 according to Superintendent Smith's specifications, with small wheels and a long stroke, and "could she ever pull!" No. 5 had 15x20 in cylinders, 36 inch drive wheels, 180 pound boiler pressure, weighed 80,550 pounds, and exerted 19,100 pounds traction force."

pic from 1989
 

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That wheel base is strange!


Sure is. Looks like it is a 4-6-0 that had a front axle added and the pilot truck chopped.

The D&RGW C-19 had 38" drivers but a more conventional wheel arrangement:
 

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Not an unsual wheel base - this is typical of short wheel base 8 wheel design with intern valve gear...the spacing is integral in the design. For Colorado Fans, the wheel base on this engine in the park is much the same as the C-17 and C-18 class, not C-16 or C-19.

The difference is that the main rod couples to the 3rd axle. The valve gear is also fitted to the 3rd axle. This is why the larger axle spacing is between axle 2 and 3.

While on the C-16 and C-19s, the main rod is coupled to the 2nd driver, with the larger axle spacing between driver 1 and 2 for valve gear space.
Designers worked to get the main rod onto the 3rd axle, but firebox and ashpan design of the late 1870s made it hard to get the valve gear inside the ash-pan space - hence moved it forward to the 2nd axle (and the main rod with it). On later designs, the ash pan is moved back, wider grate and the 3rd axle is clear. The main rod fitted to the 3rd axle delivers more direct power to the chassis, than locos with main rod fitted to the 2nd alxe - resultant of Vector forces. On the 2nd axle a portion of the piston's potential is pushed up into the crosshead guide.

Not sure you're interested in this stuff, but there is a reason for most designs.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Some cool features that I noticed were the second crosshead guide bar, the muffler on the airpump exhaust which dumps to the atmosphere instead of into the smokebox, the angle iron bolted to the pilot deck (for a toolbox?), and the shop fabricated front tender steps. Except for the axles IMO it would be a nice bash for those with an old c-16 and no interest in Colorado
 

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Posted By David Fletcher on 02/21/2009 3:51 PM
Not sure you're interested in this stuff, but there is a reason for most designs.






I can't speak for anyone else, but I'm always interested in learning more about these cool old beasts. Fascinating stuff, thanks for posting!



Great link too. Whoever took the pics did a good job, lots of detail that is rarely photographed.
 

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Thunder lake loco plans were in the narrowguage & short line gazzette (not sure which year ) did have the plan but lost it , im sure if you put a letter asking for a copy of the plan some one may sent you a copy of it .
 

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heres a list of plans that ng&slg produced the loco discussed may be in it , im sure of it but can seeit my self dana http://www.urbaneagle.com/slim/NGSLGplanlist.html
 
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