G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SWAMBO's orders.

The call of the shop was overwhelming.

Found a guy off-loading his barely used (three small projects) Jet 6" jointer/planer at about 1/2 off of retail, and couldn't resist the draw of a deal, to fill one of the last remaining voids in my sawdust development enterprise.



http://woodworking.jettools.com/Products.aspx?Part=708455&cat=333154

Summbidge is HEAVY, when you're trying to horse it into the back of a pick-em-up. Research tells me it's 212 pounds... I believe 'em.

Anyway, it's all trued up, makes nice chips, and gives great edge.

True test is a few weeks away when I go to make a new base for THIS!!



Running out of space, and have officially run out of "disposable" income...
 

·
A Steamed Elder
Joined
·
3,857 Posts
Duncan,

Very nice jointer. Be careful with that thing. My Dad almost lost all of his fingers on one hand with his about fifty years ago. They are very unforgiving! Have fun with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Posted By gary Armitstead on 06/15/2009 11:15 PM
Duncan,

Very nice jointer. Be careful with that thing. My Dad almost lost all of his fingers on one hand with his about fifty years ago. They are very unforgiving! Have fun with it.



Oh, I am *VERY* cognizant of the whirly bits of razor sharp steel, and pay them all the utmost respect.

Radial arm saw, table saw, router table, shaper, thickness planer, band saws, skil saws, even things that drill and dremel give me pause to reflect just exACTly where my digits and appendages are in reference to the dammmit spots.

Brings to mind the day I assembled my first band saw.

Got it all put togeher, adjusted and aligned the wheels/tires, blade guides and rollers, and fired that muther up.

As I was cutting some curves in some 1X stock, I had a recurring, nagging thought that I had heard this sound somewhere before.

Just about the third time that I was trying to recall just where that had been, the end of my thumb came into the slightest contact with the blade, and I had immediate and total recall of that "where", while simultaniously slamming the power switch to the off position...

A 1/8" band saw blade slicing through 1X pine makes pretty much the same sound as a 1/2" (or greater) band saw blade slicing through a leg of beef at the butcher shop.

Still stays with me...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
My jointer horror story
They hired a new guy in the shop I worked at 20 years ago. Fresh out of design school and calling himself a master cabinet maker! He came complete with ego and his own tools including a powermatic saw, Bandsaw, and 8" jointer.
He scoffed at our old 16" oliver jointer. He said it was 'unsafe' because that width wasn't really necessary for the type of work he'd be doing.
He came in late one morning, later than usual that is with coffee cup in hand and very red swollen eyes. His jointer was taking up space back by our spray booths. I had just sat up a work table near by to do some form lamination. He stopped by my bench on his way to the jointer to look at my work disapprovingly (as usual) and to sip his coffee. He engaged me in a little chit chat (unusual for him to talk to the likes of me) As we talked he walked over to his jointer and turned it on. He adjusted the bed and started jointing the face of a board. The cut was too deep for the under powered Powermatic; the oliver would have had no trouble with it, but who would want to make the first cut that deep? The jointer groaned and then seized up.
He looked at the board with mild surprise 'Oh,,, I set it too deep'. I walked up out of politness and examined the board and agreed. Then he did the single most stupid things I've ever, to this day, seen anyone do. Without turning off the power, he reached down with his bare fingers and turned the cutters!
I tried too late to warn him and to pull his elbow back from the cutters.
The motor whirred to life and the cutters spun and mild spray of blood spattered across the infeed table.
I yanked his had towards me before he had a chance to look at his fingers.
The blood was too thick and running to tell just how much damage was done, but it looked like the bottoms of his finger tips had been sliced back.
I put my hands around his fingers and applied some mild pressure till we got to the sups office. He kept saying, 'there's nothing wrong, it doesn't even hurt... I think you pulled them back before they got cut'.
The supervisor was not a very cool headed person and just blurted out what he saw, at which point the kid went all pale and wobbly on me.
I handed him off to the supervisor and he did not return that day. The boss told him to remove his tools from the shop and use only the tools that were provided,,, I think it had something to do with insurance, but the morale is 'Do not take any machine that cuts for granted'
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Some people just have to learn the hard way if at all.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top