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Once the subzero temps clear I have to get out and cut down some more redwood for building timbers and siding. I've always done this on my table saw but it feels like I make half the wood into sawdust even with a thin kerf blade. Would you rather use a bandsaw for this task? The price is somewhat daunting but Christmas is just around the corner.
Thanks, Bill
 

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Bill,
I have both type of saws and I use both of saws a lot but for ripping it's hard to beat a table saw for speed and accuracy.
 

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I agree with Dean. The tendency for the band saw to wander while ripping is too great. I use the table saw for ripping; the full-sized one for ripping it down to "manageable" pieces, then the miniature one for smaller cuts. I generally buy cedar fence planks at roughly $1.00 for a 5" x 3/4" by 6' board, so I figure I can afford to turn half of it into sawdust compared to the price of stripwood at the the hobby shop. (Heck, I can afford to turn all of it into sawdust at that price).

Having said that, there are a million reasons to get a band saw that have nothing to do with ripping wood, so if you've got some extra Christmas cash lying about, I'd say go for it. Get yourself a nice, variable speed band saw with at least 4" clearance from the table, and a 10" depth minimum, 12" or more is better.

BTW, You're just a stone's throw from me. I'm out by Quincy Reservoir. Drop me an e-mail if you're going to be up this way.

Later,

K
 

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I think a bandsaw with a fence and and the right blade is great for ripping. I really like my bandsaw, which is just a run of the mill old delta, but it's very sensitive to set up and it's certainly more finicky to set up than a table saw. With a good fence and a large blade designed for ripping you get a nice thin kerf and a precise cut. And bandsaws are safer than table saws--no kickback, no stock flying back towards the operator
 

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Ripping on a bandsaw can be tricky, but if you keep the length shorter it does a good job. You will need a wider blade, the 1/8" wanders more than the 1/2" ones.
I generally cut the pieces to length then use the bandsaw for ripping.
 

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There are benefits to ripping with a Band saw.... If your stock is thicker than 3 inches than ripping with a band saw is the proper tool for the job. Anything less than 3 inches a Table saw is the proper tool and safer tool for the job. Take it from me using the safest tool is better even if it means wasting some wood. I have been woodworking for 15 years and had many close calls because I did not use the right tool for the job. Table saw is the best tool in your shop and when used properly you can do anything with it, even cut a circle. Spend the time and make the proper jigs and push sticks t safely manipulate your wood through the blade and you will be happy with your results.

 

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Everyone,

I sure appreciate all the solid advice found here on the MLS forums.

Best,
TJ
 

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My vote is for the table saw. Primarily because it is what I have and I am used to it. A bandsaw is really first rate for ripping, if you get it set right and get used to it. I've seen guys rip 6" wide slabs to 1/16" thickness on a bandsaw that "lownote" has. They do very well. For either tool, you should study up, get a good book on the tool and make up the jigs the pro's use. A while back I wrote up a little "how-to" for the table saw.

http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46385

That blade is a DeWalt 8", 40 tooth carbide,thin kerf, regular contractor's blade. A 10" balde on a 10" table saw is way too agressive and wastefu for our model workl.


Take care, Merry Christmas, Bob
 

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Posted By xo18thfa on 12/19/2008 6:55 PM
My vote is for the table saw. Primarily because it is what I have and I am used to it. A bandsaw is really first rate for ripping, if you get it set right and get used to it. I've seen guys rip 6" wide slabs to 1/16" thickness on a bandsaw that "lownote" has. They do very well. For either tool, you should study up, get a good book on the tool and make up the jigs the pro's use. A while back I wrote up a little "how-to" for the table saw.

http://archive.mylargescale.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46385

That blade is a DeWalt 8", 40 tooth carbide,thin kerf, regular contractor's blade. A 10" balde on a 10" table saw is way too agressive and wastefu for our model workl.

Take care, Merry Christmas, Bob

Bob, et al

The link below is to a file that I made of your topic in PDF format.

Cutting scale lumber; how I do it
File Format: PDF - File Size: 1MB
Left-click to Open / Right-click to Download Copy
 
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