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Super Modulator
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22,263 Posts
The Wide Radius is about 10' diameter, and is basically not a "normal" switch, since the rails of the diverging side are curved past the frog.

The #6 is a much longer and "gentler" switch, much more suited to mainline operation.

In the real world, the "frog number" is always stated, the Wide Radius is about a #4 in my estimation.

The answer to which one to use is based on your available space and minimum radius.

If I am to give a short answer, use the #6 wherever you can, better for long trains and long cars, and just much smoother in general.

Quick question, are you going stainless or brass?

Also, check my site, there is a lot of information on each of these switches and what you have to do to make them smooth operating, both of them need work right out of the box.

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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22,263 Posts
I would recommend the USAT #6 over the Aristo. The Aristo has a significant problem with the frog, it's too "big" to keep it simple.

The wheels drop into the frog because it's too wide. The micro switch and electrics corrode easily. The USAT #6 is far superior from the reports I have received. The Aristo frog is plated pot metal.

The Aristo WR switches can be made to work as smoothly as a baby's butt though, need a few things, but easy and quick to do, and they match 10' diameter curves perfectly. Follow ALL the instructions on my web site, it takes longer to read them than to execute them.

Easements are dangerous, the utility company has the right to drive right over your track with no notice. I would put what I can afford to replace there!

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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22,263 Posts
USAT only makes the #6 and a VERY sharp turnout, maybe a 4' diameter... do not use switches this tight unless you are forced to!

That's why I recommended the Aristo WR turnout. They also work well in switchyards:



Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
Joined
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22,263 Posts
If you can fit it... It will allow much smoother operation, longer trains, and the ability to back the train up without derailments. Like curvature of track, the more "gentle" the turnout the better.

Real railroads would consider a #10 sharp, and often had #20 switches... of course narrow gauge curves and switches were sharper.

What do you believe your tightest track diameter curve will be?

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
Joined
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22,263 Posts
Good idea. I have 10' diameter minimum, have run 40 car trains for 6 hours straight, on inner mainline with 2 WR switches... it will work. You could also bend the 8 footers out or use them on spurs...

I use #6's on the mainline except in 2 spots, where the WR switches are... notice the picture of the yard above, the crossover off the main is #6, all else is WR. The wye is a #6, in each direction.

Regards, Greg
 
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