G Scale Model Train Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been watching marketplace and have seen some used 3D printers for sale, like and Ender 3 pro for $150 supposedly used like to print 3 things and guy bought a couple more larger printers. Is it wise to buy a used 3D printer (in the world of crazy inflation) in hope of saving some money? If one were to go look at a used machine, what would one look for to see the condition of the machine and like how much use and wear it has? Are these Enders easy to repair and are parts available and reasonably priced? And what accessories or modifications are good to have? Like the $150 has a big spool on the top and the guys says the buyer can have some yellow springs.

Asked in my last post and received no reply, is the good downloads on the net to use to make stuff for our hobby?

Doug
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,163 Posts
Doug,
Perhaps a difficult question to answer.
If you have no experience at all with 3D printing and just want to learn and maybe find something on the internet to print, then probably any printer will do what you need within your budget.
A used machine 'should' be fine as really not a lot can wear out on a printer that will stop it from working.
If you are looking ahead, and intend to 'draw' your own parts to print, then you probably need to look at the 'bed' size to make sure that you can indeed make your part on that printer.
Of course you can always make smaller parts that can be joined, but I like to print without the need for joining.
Then which filament to use. PLA is nice and easy to use, doesn't need a heated bed, BUT might suffer in extreme heat.
I use PETG which is a little more finicky to print with and needs a heated bed, but has a higher heat tolerance.
Then there are filaments like ABS which is even better, but needs more attention to parameters and smells when printing.
3D printing can be very satisfying, but can also be very frustrating.
Some people get a printer and use the standard settings, and everything prints perfectly for them, whilst others have great difficulty.
I use a Creality CR10S, somewhat modified now, but has worked very well for me, so I would hope that the Ender is of similar quality.
Good luck,
David Leech, Canada
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi Doug,
I find filament printers are more finicky to setup and produce mediocre results for the hobby.
Resin printers make beautiful prints but are a lot messier to clean up afterwards. I noticed the elegoo mars 2 (resin) are going on sale for very cheap now.

Either way, I probably wouldn't go used unless the risk didn't bother you. I use both styles of printers but would only use resin for train stuff.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Greg, I sure do want to print things for this hobby. I still never have built the locomotive kit a friend had done for me at one of those Maker clubs as I left the kit at another friend's house and that friend put it away and I have not seen it since, just like my Ozarks Miniatures Climax kit. There were also cars on the site where I got the program for the locomotive and might want to print those. I would also like to print parts for another hobby making "lowers: and "frames" and grips and such and think some plastic like ABS would be good for those.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So David, what about printing in an unheated building? Let us say I want to print and it is cold as it is now, and someone else in the household would sing the blues if the printing stank, could one print in some unheated building? What alterations might be necessary?

Doug
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,163 Posts
Doug,
That all depends on how unheated the room gets.
I think that all types of 3D printing will NOT like being at less than room temperature.
Some filaments apparently do not even like a cold draft, and will warp and do strange things.
I am lucky and have a heated basement and with PLA and PETG, the aroma from the melting filament is quite pleasant.
When I was trying ABS, HIPS and some of the other specialized filaments, the toxic smell could be found throughout the whole house even with closed doors.
As I have, if the printer is in some kind of enclosure, or cabinet, it should stay warm enough, although you might need to add some heat either inside, or outside of the enclosure.
If however the temperature inside the building is below freezing, I don't think that printing will go very well, as with filament printing it relies of the 'hot end' staying at the right temperature to melt the filament. With resin printers, some of the group that I am a member of talk about having to heat their resins during printing too.
All the best,
David Leech, Canada
p.s. Attached is an example of a British Electric loco body that I recently printed for a friend in 1/32 scale, which I don't regard as a mediocre result!
Train Vehicle Electricity Rolling stock Rolling
 

· Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
David, first of all, for me unfortunately the used Ender 3 Pro was sold the day I decided to go for it, so need to shop more. Also on Marketplace, saw some sort of insulated enclosure made for the 3D printers for sale. Looked similar to an indoor grow tent. So that may be useful for cold weather printing in a chilly barn.

Doug
 

· Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So as an example of my problem, just saw an Ender 3 Max for sale supposedly used one time. Always wonder why only used one time. i watched some reviews of that unit and got mixed opinions from great except for some minor flaws to not good at all. so not sure if I should pass on that unit???? Any guys have an opinion on that printer?
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,163 Posts
Doug,
I just watched a couple of the many YouTube videos about this machine.
It appears to be a good one, depending on price, but maybe I never saw the negative reviews.
As to why one would be used 'just once', 3D printing is NOT for everyone.
I believe that you have to have a mind that can understand what it is all about, as I can see it being very frustrating for some people.
I know when I bought my first printer, for the first couple of months, I was forever contacting the seller for advice before I fully felt comfortable with the whole process.
It can be very satisfying when it all works 'right' for you.
Cheers,
David Leech, Canada
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top