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Using Green Velvet
Pro and con and better?
 

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Going back about 8 or more I used it by recommendation of a dealer, found out later that was all he carried. After several months on the shelf it settled out. I warmed it to put it back into solution and less than 2 weeks later settled out again. Learned from the person I bought it from, he learned from the sales person of their company that is normal if not used with in 6 months and is really designed for larger than G scale. Since then nothing but Roundhouse steam oil. Don't know about today, but as of 17 that they were able to ship it to the US without anything else in the order.
 

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I normally use the stuff from Roundhouse, but for the last couple years, I have been using up a supply of steam oil from Hyde Out Mountain that I got with a engine I owned years ago. A bit thicker that RH oil but seems to do the job just fine. I will be ordering a couple bottles of RH oil here soon when a friend orders himself more.
 

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This may sound crazy but Dave Hottmann who I have always thought of as a pioneer of the hobby used Lucas oil stabilizer and swore it is better than steam oil.
I would be interested to see if anyone else has used it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Its about steamroil not about
Sparkyoil
 

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I have used a blend of steam oil and Lucas oil in well worn piston valve locos.
It kept the going long after they ceased to perform well on just steam oil.

Harvey C.
 

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I have only used Green Velvet in my Accucraft locomotives. My Accucraft " Earl " has over 140 hours of run time on it and only has had Green Velvet run through it. It runs like brand new.
Charles M
 

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This may sound crazy but Dave Hottmann who I have always thought of as a pioneer of the hobby used Lucas oil stabilizer and swore it is better than steam oil.
I would be interested to see if anyone else has used it
Hi Bille,
I used to use Dave Hottmann's advice and put it in all my locomotives, but now I have thrown away the mixture. In NON-superheated locomotives (i.e. not through the burner tube) the mixture works fine. However, I have found that it can carbon-ize (or what ever the oil mixture does when burnt) in superheater pipes. I have a RH Millie that needs the steam pipe replaced due to blockage. I could have continued to use the mixture in the rest of my locos, but I just want one bottle of oil to reach for. For those people with Roundhouse locos, my advice is to not use the mixture.
Dan Fuller
Carrollton, Texas
 

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Just my 'penny's worth' on this subject....locally we use Morris Cylinder lube 680 for our miniature steam trains (5/71/4 in etc) but for my Roundhouse/Accucraft locos we successfully dilute this oil down using approx 10-12 pc Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF). Anyone else doing this ??
rgds
Brian A.
 

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This subject comes up often and for my two cents worth, I have been running gauge 1 live steam since 1984 and have many live steam locomotives (27 actually) and from my experience I would strongly recommend only use steam oil designed for the purpose.
In my previous employment for a large international transmission manufacturer supplying various car companies with diffs and transmissions I got to know industrial chemists from two major oil companies Shell and Mobil very well and asked them about properties of steam oil for use in my hobby as they designed and produced special oils for us in automotive and industrial applications and their expert advice is do not use any other oil other than steam oil.
I have attached their spec sheets below and recommendations for steam oil and as this was a few years ago the names of the oil may change but they are the recommended steam oils for use in sub-miniature ( that's us) and bigger up to 1:1 scale live steam.
They pointed out that steam is not 'scaled' down for our use nor is it's temperature much different for saturated steam, we use 1:1 scale steam (except we do not have really high temp super heated steam, there are higher spec oils for that) and it must emulsify with steam and water, without destroying the protection of long chain molecules of the oil to provide lubrication. Oils made for other purposes have great lubrication properties BUT only without the contamination of water such as in a motor vehicle application. If you have ever seen oil from a car that has had even a slight amount of water contamination you will have seen the poor lubrication and scoring of metal that occured. These Chemical engineers I asked said the worst oils to substitute for steam oil are ones for vehicle use and you should always use proper steam oil.
Nowdays both Shell and Mobil sell most of their "steam oil" for other industrial uses particularly in huge gear drives that are often outside in mining and industry with potential leaking sealing points that will let in the ingress of water and the lubrication properties needed to emulsify with water and withstand high heat are much the same as in a steam engine so they are branded as such but are steam oils, these oil companies supply worldwide both stationary and railway steam with these oils for saturated steam often in different viscosities.
The recommended oil is 460 grade and I have been using Mobil 600 (460 grade) for well over 30 years with no clogged or burnt residues in our so-called superheater tubes ( more like steam driers ) and cylinder lubrication over a long period has been excellent. It does make a mess on your loco when exhausted out in a draughted boiler and it can go sticky if you don't run your loco for a very long period of time but it's what you should use.
Roundhouse use a proper steam oil of a lower viscosity than 460 ( around 380 I believe ) and that's good and Green Velvet also does a proper steam oil.
Over the years I have heard of many say "...use this oil ( insert name of non steam oil usually auto related) it's great and heaps cheaper.." always from those who have no expertise in lubrication and their loco's often have the worst scoring marks on cylinders and valves and have burnt oil clog their super heater steam pipes.
If it's not designed for steam, don't use it !
( Sorry everyone, I'll get off my soapbox now and resume enjoying model steam trains)
Russell
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
(y)(y)(y)
 

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Accucraft sells steam oil in conveniently sized squeeze bottles. It's shown under "live steam parts" on their website. I've been using it for 20 years and haven't had any issues with lubrication.
 
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