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I looked at it last night and thought about narrowing the saddle to bring everything in towards the center, but moving or replacing the cylinders would be a better idea.
Don't try narrowing the saddle - the frames sit between the saddle and the cylinders - you can see in my photo where the bottom of the valve chests stop and the straight part begins. That's where the frame fits.

I think your cylinders are fine - its the valve chests that look a bit big. Leave the cylinders alone and you won't have any bind problems with the main rods.

My older units have the end cap moulded on, but the main piston rod assembly pops off the other end and can be re-mounted at any angle. So you could attempt what I started - cut the cylinders off, narrow the valve chests and reset the cylinders at whatever angle they work best. Want my spare to practice on?
 

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Posted By Bruce Chandler on 11 Jun 2012 10:50 AM
Looking very nice.

I'd take some Neolube and blacken all the valve gear and drivers...


But the he'd have to explain the Neolube to the wife -

Posted By lownote on 10 Jun 2012 10:44 AM


... my wife complains about too many "black steam engines."
 

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The loco looks great. I can't say I'm a big fan of Neolube, though, at least not on the valve gear and drivers. The drivers should be painted to match the loco. For the valve gear, I've found coating the shiny metal valve gear with a clear matte does wonders. You get the look of unpainted steel, but it''s not glaringly shiny and takes weathering very well. I use Badger's ModelFlex dull-coat. It brushes on well and dries nice and flat. It also stands up well to the rigors of running, resisting chipping and peeling that I've had with other finishes. And the main piston rod would definitely be a polished silver color.

Later,

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
Took half a day off and it rained which allowed me to postpone the yard chores. I made some progress. The loco is getting closer to done.

The color scheme is "borrowed" from Kevin Strong's recent Tuscarora loco. The silver striping is Pactra tape. The paint is still Krylon camo olive with a lot of powdered graphite rubbed over it.

I'm fairly happy with it. It's too wide in a lot of places, and of course it needs patching and painting and lettering and a tender. But I think if the question is "can you make an Annie into a standard gage loco?" the answer is yes, especially if you're nearsighted and not too picky







The handrails were made out of stuff I had on had, and they are too small, I think. But too small is probably better than too big if I want a standard gage look. I added a tool box to the walkway on the engineer's side.
 

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Wow! I really, Really, REALLY! like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Is that a 1:32 model of the young Bruce Chandler? What's the story on that loco? It's pretty much exactly the look I want.

Thank you all again. If you see anything that needs correcting, let me know--I might not be able to do it, but I can try. Last night I added sand lines and electrical lines and some piping. I need to extend the injector line and plumb the air pump. I always find the air pumps hard.

The loco should really have two air tanks, so I might make one.

I'm probably going to letter it for the southern. In the late 19th century up through 1912, the Southern ran a branch line from Alexandria VA to Bluemont VA. It passed within a mile of our house. The line was bought by the Washington and Old Dominion, which gradually electrified it and ran it at a loss till the 1960s. For about a decade, it leased locos from the Southern.

So I'm imagining this loco as running in about 1910, on a branch line with mixed freight and passenger service.

I know the Southern is famous for green and gold, and the websites oin the southern specific green and gold, but Baldwin made olive green and silver its standard color from the 1890s through 1910, and I'm not sur the southern used green and gold in 1910.

And anyway I like the look of olive and silver!
 

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"I'm not sur the southern used green and gold in 1910."

Mike;

Probably not. 1910 was prior to the Railway Grouping in England. President Spencer (of the Southern Ry) got the idea for the green livery on a trip to England, where he saw a similar livery on the Southern Ry's (of England) passenger locomotives.

Yours,
David Meashey
 

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Playing in Google found this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Railway_%28Great_Britain%29#Livery which gives 1912 as the UK Southern's first use of green.
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
According to Wikipedia, Spencer died in 1906, 4 years before the UK southern, according to wikipedia, went to green.

DR Rickman sent me to some excellent resources on the US Southern, which seem to suggest that the southern was using green and gold early in the twentieth century, but not the famous green and gold you see today. I need to sort this out!
 

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Southern Ry. (US) painted their engines black with gold lettering prior to 1926. After that date, passenger engines were delivered or repainted in green with gold lettering. The Ps-4 pacifics (such as 1401 in the Smithsonian) were the first to be delivered in the new scheme. There were three basic variations - the Crescent Limited, double stripe, and single stripe. The Crescent scheme was essentially the double stripe scheme, with crescents on the cylinders and cab, and different lettering. The choice between double and single stripe seems to have been primarily up to the paint shop foreman when the engine was painted, although it seems that the double stripes were more common early on (and probably how Southern ordered the engines when they were purchased).

Freight engines were of course always painted black, so the black "freight scheme" is a good indication of what a Southern passenger engine would have looked like prior to 1926. The smokeboxes on all the engines were a light gray graphite, although the exact shade varied from almost silver to nearly charcoal, again depending on the shop. In general, the color was much lighter prior to about 1940, so that it looks like silver paint in early photos. I make mine with a 50/50 mix of silver and gray paint.

So, the short answer is that your engine should be black with a light gray graphite smokebox. The dark green boiler might or might not be accurate for a variety of Southern-owned short lines, most of which had used equipment and their own paint shops. Black and green look so similar that it is almost impossible to tell without reference material from the builder, but the engines would almost certainly have been repainted black as needed.
 

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OOPS! Sorry, must have been another Southern Railway president. The account I had read stated it was the president of the US Southern Railway, and I did not have my reference material handy, as I was at work. Ususally remember most details, but I'll just have to list that as a "senior moment."

Yours,
David Meashey
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Thank you Dave. DK Rickman seems to have the definitive account.


Well, it's just about done, and I'm going to leave it like this for a while while I think about colors and about the tender.








In general I'm pretty pleased with it. The legacy of 1:22 is really clear in the wide running gear and the oversize details on the running gear. But on the whole I think it looks like a standard gauge loco. I'm going to set it aside for a while while I figure out how to do the tender, which has to be narrowed, shortened, and lowered. I have no idea, at the moment, how I'll do that!
 

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Posted By lownote on 14 Jun 2012 10:00 AM
The Annie tender is kind of problematic though Why? I have to agree with Bruce - build it from scratch. A newer Southern Ry. or USRA style tender would go a long way toward helping the engine look modern and standard gauge. Something like these:


The first is VERY typical of Southern Ry. with the long coal space. I suspect that Southern leaned toward tenders with relatively little water space, as they had plenty of water available, and frequently hard work for small engines. Whatever the reason, Southern tenders were unusually small and biased toward coal over water.

If it helps, I can provide drawings (in DXF or PDF format) for a Southern 7,500 Gallon tender as used behind the Ks class 2-8-0s - the various classes frequently had similar or even identical tenders - and sometimes tenders moved around among different classes.
 

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Uh, I probably shouldn't bring this up, but I will anyway. It may be too small, but I was musing whether the Lionel LS Atlantic's tender could be bashed for this project. It may be too narrow, but some TLC with a band saw may allow you to widen it out. I haven't seen one of those locomotives since ECLSTS, so my idea of its size is a little fuzzy.

Just another $0.02,
David Meashey
 
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