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Two things come to mind:
One is that the handrails which are correct for a 1:22 loco are too high for a 1:29 loco, so you might want to move them down a bit.
The other is that the cab looks off - like a hot rod that has been chopped. It might be too wide as well, but it definitely looks too long, especially the window.
If you are interested in doing a Southern loco, I could suggest a couple prototypes, and provide scale drawings of a southern Ry. cab that would look good on that model.
 

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I've been contemplating the same sort of bash myself. In my case, I'd make a Danville & Western engine, since the drivers are spot on for it, the counterweights are easy enough to modify as needed, and I have a thing for the D&W. The line had three, two sisters and another that was almost identical despite being from a different builder.


Here's a builder's photo of #20, and a photo from 1933, both of which should link to larger images:




If you're interested, more info can be found on my web site, http://southern-railway.railfan.net/dw/

Whatever you do, I look forward to seeing the results.
 

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Posted By lownote on 04 May 2012 09:50 AM
That loco on the right would be a very nice match for a standard gage annie
Both photos are of the same engine, just taken some 30 years apart. It gives you an idea how much an engine could change in appearance over it's life.

Posted By lownote on 04 May 2012 09:50 AM
When did the Southern go to the green paint scheme, as on the Pacific at the Smithsonian?
I believe the first green Ps-4 class Pacifics were delivered in 1926 (the earlier ones were delivered in black), and that other engines were repainted green after that time. I have a paint diagram dated 1927 which clearly defines the standard green scheme.

Posted By lownote on 04 May 2012 09:50 AM
For me, the hard part is probably going to be the cab.
I suggest that you look at simply building your own. They're pretty simple - just a front and back, with the roof and sides being either separate (on older designs) or one piece (on newer ones). In HO scale, I can knock out a cab in an afternoon without any trouble.

Some Southern engines:
#958


#967


And #1113, a squat little engine and somewhat unusual for Southern



I'm not sure about #1113, but the 900's has 62" drivers - about as close as you're going to get to the model's 58" on Southern proper. Most, if not all, passenger engines received green paint in the late '20s. Done properly, I know of few better looking paint schemes for North American steam locomotives. If you want, the artwork is available for free, and I can send it to you or straight to the decal producer of your choice.
 

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What about making a new boiler? It's easy enough to do, and then you'd have it to scale. How much is it off by?
 

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I hate to say anything less than positive about such a beautiful model, but you might want to know..

You would not usually see rivets at the edge of the cylinder jacket. There might be a few to hold it in place, but in general the jacket would have been attached behind the scenes, as it were, and show no rivets or fasteners at all. Of course, specific prototypes could have been different, but overall I would avoid their use unless you know they're prototypical.
 

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Wow! I really, Really, REALLY! like that.
 

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Southern Ry. (US) painted their engines black with gold lettering prior to 1926. After that date, passenger engines were delivered or repainted in green with gold lettering. The Ps-4 pacifics (such as 1401 in the Smithsonian) were the first to be delivered in the new scheme. There were three basic variations - the Crescent Limited, double stripe, and single stripe. The Crescent scheme was essentially the double stripe scheme, with crescents on the cylinders and cab, and different lettering. The choice between double and single stripe seems to have been primarily up to the paint shop foreman when the engine was painted, although it seems that the double stripes were more common early on (and probably how Southern ordered the engines when they were purchased).

Freight engines were of course always painted black, so the black "freight scheme" is a good indication of what a Southern passenger engine would have looked like prior to 1926. The smokeboxes on all the engines were a light gray graphite, although the exact shade varied from almost silver to nearly charcoal, again depending on the shop. In general, the color was much lighter prior to about 1940, so that it looks like silver paint in early photos. I make mine with a 50/50 mix of silver and gray paint.

So, the short answer is that your engine should be black with a light gray graphite smokebox. The dark green boiler might or might not be accurate for a variety of Southern-owned short lines, most of which had used equipment and their own paint shops. Black and green look so similar that it is almost impossible to tell without reference material from the builder, but the engines would almost certainly have been repainted black as needed.
 

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Posted By lownote on 14 Jun 2012 10:00 AM
The Annie tender is kind of problematic though Why? I have to agree with Bruce - build it from scratch. A newer Southern Ry. or USRA style tender would go a long way toward helping the engine look modern and standard gauge. Something like these:


The first is VERY typical of Southern Ry. with the long coal space. I suspect that Southern leaned toward tenders with relatively little water space, as they had plenty of water available, and frequently hard work for small engines. Whatever the reason, Southern tenders were unusually small and biased toward coal over water.

If it helps, I can provide drawings (in DXF or PDF format) for a Southern 7,500 Gallon tender as used behind the Ks class 2-8-0s - the various classes frequently had similar or even identical tenders - and sometimes tenders moved around among different classes.
 

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You don't need styrene tube. Get creative! How about dowels and wood blocks to form the basic shape, followed by a wrapper of embossed foil tape? Or you can use sheet brass, styrene, or even paper and lacquer/varnish/shellac. All you need is some way to form the shape, and then add rivets, details, etc.

I suspect you're thinking that it's too hard to make a good looking scratchbuilt tender, but it's really not that hard. It's nothing but a box with rounded corners and some rivets on it. Carve it out of foam, a block of wood, anything you like to work in. Try it - the worst that happens is that you've spent a few hours and learned something new. The best thing is that you have a new tender!
 

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Too high? I don't think so. Notice that the top of the tank lines up with the bottom of the windows, much like the prototype. The coal boards are a little high, though, and the curve looks really out of place. Two suggestions:
1. Cut them off and make new ones. Same length, about half the height, and matching angles front and back.
2. Soften them in boiling water and massage them flat, then cut off about half the height. It might be easier to do this if you cut them off the tender first.

Also, move that rear truck back, and put a steel channel frame under the tank.
 

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If you like the silver better, go with silver (and silver lettering). Justify is as an early paint scheme - remember that Southern was formed in 1894 as a collection of many smaller railroads, and it never really lost that disjointed feel. Maybe this was ordered right before that time and delivered right around the merger, or a few years after, before Southern had standardized things like paint schemes.
 

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VERY nice work! Not only does it not look like an Annie or narrow gauge, but it also does not look as old fashioned. It has that muscular look of a late steam era branch line passenger engine, and it definitely looks Southern! I'm impressed.

It is crying out for a nice long Southern pilot, though.
 
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