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Wouldn't they have just stuck, to the degree that they could, standard-size appliances on narrow gauge locos?
To an extent, yes. For instance, a 9" Westinghouse airpump is the same size regardless of the gauge of the loco it's put on, as is a 15" headlight, generator, etc. But 9" in 1:22.5 is bigger than 9" in 1:29, so "measure twice, order once" to paraphrase an old saying. Many of Trackside Details' details are 1:24, and might translate well to appliances fitted to the standard gauge locos. If they don't have overall sizes listed on their web site, ask here. I've got some in my parts bin I can measure for you if need be.

Later,

K
 

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If I'm following your logic, that'd presume that the appliances would be somewhat proportional to the size of the loco (i.e., they'd use a 15" diameter headlight on a narrow gauge loco vs. an 18" headlight on a standard gauge one or something of that ilk. In some cases, that'd be fairly accurate. A narrow gauge loco may only need the capacity of a 9" airpump (or dual 9" airpumps) whereas a standard gauge loco would likely need 11" or something like that. Other appliances would have been largely the same size (injectors, safety valves, clean-out plugs, etc.) Fortunately, in most cases the appliances of different sizes are similar enough in appearance that a 1:24 model of a 15" headlight looks very close to an 18" headlight in 1:29, so they're interchangeable to an extent. (At least so long as you're not counting rivets.)

I'll definitely be interested in seeing what you end up with on this one.

Later,

K
 

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Pete, all the EBT 10-wheelers had straight boilers. The only EBT locos to have wagon-top boilers were the first nos. 3 - 5. Number 9 (the 2nd-hand Mogul) may have had a slight taper to her boiler, but it wasn't very pronounced if it was there. (The lighting in the photo of #9 at Mt. Union gives the impression it may, but the geometry of the domes and other fittings aren't conclusive. When they built #5 ostensibly to the same drawings as that loco, it came with a straight boiler.

Later,

K
 

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Try lowering the windows just a bit. When you raised the cab (which helped), it looks like you didn't change the windows, so they sit higher. Drop the bottom edge maybe 1/4" or so and see what that gets you proportionally. To start, maybe just take a black Sharpie and color the bottom of the opening before making any cuts to give you a visual reference as to what it might look like. The sill should be about halfway down the side of the cab, about 3 - 3.5' from the floor from very rough paper-on-screen measurements of the drawings. But definitely, you want the bottom sill low enough to where you can stand and rest your arms comfortably on it. Your poor fireman is up to his armpits.

Later,

K
 

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The loco looks great. I can't say I'm a big fan of Neolube, though, at least not on the valve gear and drivers. The drivers should be painted to match the loco. For the valve gear, I've found coating the shiny metal valve gear with a clear matte does wonders. You get the look of unpainted steel, but it''s not glaringly shiny and takes weathering very well. I use Badger's ModelFlex dull-coat. It brushes on well and dries nice and flat. It also stands up well to the rigors of running, resisting chipping and peeling that I've had with other finishes. And the main piston rod would definitely be a polished silver color.

Later,

K
 

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I'll second Ken's thoughts on the curved top. From what I can see from the photos, there appears to be a seam along the top where you can make a cut and install straight sides in its place. No Bondo needed. Evergreen makes some half-round styrene that makes great beading on the top edge of tenders. I use the .040" or .060" stuff if I recall. Do that, and I think you'll have a definite winner. (Sure beats the snot out of embossing a whole tender worth of rivets--a task that currently awaits me in my workshop that I'm still steadfastly avoiding--and I even have a rivet press to make the job easy!)

If there's one other thing I'd consider revisiting, it would be the front pilot. It sits far too high off the rails. I'd lower it by around 1/4", and put a proper working coupler on the front set at the appropriate height to whatever flavor of coupler you're using. Chances are good that you'd have to lower the coupler on the pilot to be compatible anyway, so why not make it operable, the right height, and bring the bottom edge of the cow catcher low enough to where the cow won't just slide underneath. ;)

Later,

K
 
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