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Brian that is a great site to browse. One day at work a year or two ago a coworker who was exceptionally knowledgeable about the Ma & Pa sat with me and showed me that site, and then traced the entire route of the Ma & Pa from Baltimore to York using a combination of the former Topozone website and Mapquest or one of those mapping sites with the satellite view option. It was a very winding route up through Baltimore and Harford Counties.  As a sidenote, Topozone was exceptionally useful because it had many fallen flag RR's ROWs still shown on the maps despite tracks being ripped up years ago.  Unfortunately Topozone was taken over by Trails.com, who now want $50 a year to use their site. 


Al 
 

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Pretty cool stuff, Brian. Thanks for posting.

BTW, if you are ever cruising around various railroad sites, I am looking for pictures of an elevated crossing tower--the kind the gateman stayed in to lower the road crossing gates. I have a partial view of one out of a Model Railroader, but I'd like to see what the underpinnings of the tower look like, what they're made of, etc.
 

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FWIW.... That Ma&Pa railroad right-o-way actually runs through my house. I have many photos of my backyard 100 years ago as well as development over the years. Photos of the trestles and bridges next door. Spikes (including narrow gauge spikes) come up out of the ground on the roadbed which we use as our unpaved driveway. Yes, my garden railway is built upon the real railroad. As I write this I am sitting dead center on the previous location of the standard gauge track. This IS the history I follow. The Bachmann 4-4-0 B&L (Baltimore & Liegh RR) is shown in the history book sitting on the trestle next door after the wreck of Feb. 19, 1899.
 
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