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Building a station from Garden Texture plans. Decided to make shingles from beer cans due to budget restrictions and afraid wood shingles wouldn't hold up outdoors because they are so thin.
Got one section of roof done. Painted it with flat exterior latex for a base coat, it looks really good.
 
Cut ends off off cans split and flattened them as well as I could, then cut them into 3/8" strips. Cut 1/4" notches in strips with scissors and glued them on to sub-base with Liquid Nails adhesive. This is probably a slow tedious way to shingle a roof, but the result looks great.

This is my first building for out doors, so I'm learning as I go. Hope to post pics when I get some.

Does anyone know what they use to print the labels on beer cans? They appear to be painted or lithographed, do they have a top coat over the design ?  I'm wondering if latex paint will stick or eventually peel off.
 

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The cedar wood shingles hold up pretty well outdoors especially if you give them a coat of preservative every couple of years. I would use spray can enamels to paint the aluminum if you go that route.

-Brian
 

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Decided to make shingles from beer cans

Interesting idea.
I'd be interested in seeing pictures of the shingles installed, before and after painting.
Dawg :cool:
 

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Joe,

Beverage cans are almost always litho printed. If their is a top coat it will likley be a UV coating. I don't think it is used on most beverage cans though. If it is used and is matt finished you should have no broblem painting over it with some kind of spray enamel. Gloss finishes will give you a problem so avoid them.

The bets bet is to try the print you want to use. Once it completely dries try to scrape it off. If it dosen't scratch off it shoule withstand the weather.
 

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Good thought.

I've never heard of using 'beer cans' for shingles but I've used them a lot as corrugated sheets for roofs and siding.  Even some fencing.  I'll post a picture when I have a minute to size some old ones in my web space.

Fixed it.....:)



Anyhow, a very good point is that you should heat these cans up to about 300 for about15 miinutes after the tops and bottoms have been cut off.  Use your BBQ.  This removes the 'spring' and makes them as easy to cut and bend as paper.  I run my through a corrugating tool but you wouldn't have to do that.  Of course they would paint better after that process as well.

BTW: I make my own cider shingles and they will hold up outside very well with a coat of Varathane (Clear exterior varnish) every two or three years.

Dave
 

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I agree with Mr. Winter.  Cooking the cans tends to convert the interior & exterior coatings.  I usually let it weather a few months till the coating disappears.  I have only applied the Modern Options Rust treatment, which is a primer, metallic iron oxide paint, and an activator.  It has stayed on for several years now.  The bird dropping can remove paint more than anything else.  Here is one on my rusty buildings.  They actually look better with age.
 

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Posted By Richard Weatherby on 01/22/2008 3:43 PM
I agree with Mr. Winter.  Cooking the cans tends to convert the interior & exterior coatings.  I usually let it weather a few months till the coating disappears.  I have only applied the Modern Options Rust treatment, which is a primer, metallic iron oxide paint, and an activator.  It has stayed on for several years now.  The bird dropping can remove paint more than anything else.  Here is one on my rusty buildings.  They actually look better with age.


I agree.  Those rusty buildings are really beautiful.  :D  Nice job!

Dave
 

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I guess this is just one more reason not to drink beer... I always thought you got shingles from the same virus as causes Chickenpox.
 

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Thanks for all the responses guys. I'll see how this holds up in the sun and 100 degree temps here this summer.
 

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WOW! Great looking 'rust' guys./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/tongue.gif
Where can I get a tool to bend the aluminum to look like that? I purchased this scaled metal roofing from a store on Ebay.

It looks pretty good but needs to be aged a little. The problem is that it is very thin and bends very easily. I have no shortage of beer cans. All I will have to do is go through the truck beds of my co workers.(ALABAMA REDNECKS!!!!)/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/hehe.gif
Jeff
Tallapoosa and Southern RR
 

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FYI

This is the little thingy that I use.  It cost me about $12.00 a while ago but other people have found them for less.  Look in Micheals.



Dave
 

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My crimpler is the Fiskars paper crimpler available at WalMart, Micheals, JoAnn Etc.  Some where from $10-$20.  I mounted mine on a board and use vice-grip pliers to turn the handle.  I get more pressure and deeper crimps.


  The real secret is cutting the top and bottom off of the cans.


Then cut the can lengthwise and then cut the tapered collars off.  You should have a sheet of aluminum.
Then cook them at 650 degrees F for 30 minutes or until golden brown.  This will soften the aluminum and remove the spring.  The past couple of cold days have been great for cooking cans in my wood pellet stove.
 

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It's amazing what you guys can do with a beer can.  I think I'll go have another.:D

Jeff,

Good to see a fellow largescaler close to home.  I am just down 280 from you in Waverly.

Later,

Dan
 
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