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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK here's another query,
Looking through back issues of "Narrow Gauge and Industrial Railway Modeling Review" with an eye towards 7/8ths scale modeling I find articles showing several Sewage Works trains with tippers discharging large chunks and smaller materials into trucks as late as the mid 60's. What process is followed, composting, etc to get from raw sewage to that point?

I'm sure even in Jolly Olde they had indoor plumbing before that time. Any information would be welcomed.
Thanks,

Tom
 

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Tom, what you are seeing with the little sewerage plant diesel loco's and hoppers is two things, they use the hoppers to take the filtration media out to the settling ponds, then,hopefully, a different set of hoppers to take away the treated, clean solid remains after processing.
Yes, even over here in "Jollye Old",
we have plumbing that takes waste to the sewerage plant (farms a we call them) for processing. Have a look at the link below.

Rod

http://www.theguardians.com/Microbiology/gm_mbs16.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Evenin' All,
Thanks Rod for the informative link. Thanks Jack (I think) for the encouragement to bypass the "grid" but here in the boondocks we already process our sewage, it's called a septic tank and leach field.
Interestingly while on vacation this past week I discovered a book "British Sewage Works...and Notes on the Sewage Farms of Paris and on Two German Works" by M.N. Baker published by the Engineering News Publishing Co of New York in 1904! Mr Baker was Associate Editor of Engineering News, author of "Sewage Purification In America", "Sewerage and Sewage Purification", "Potable Water", Municipal Engineering and Sanitation", and joint author of "Sewage Disposal in the United State". What better qualifications does one need to discuss...well you know?
I printed out all 146 pages and have read a bit, enough to confirm that the process preceding 1904 was similar but not as scientifically based. The remaining solids were spread out on the ground to dry and then sold to farmers as a crop amendment. I am converting a Regner Lumberjack to 7/8 scale to haul my Sewage works train of Bachmann wooden side dump cars. It is a bit whimsical for sure but factually based.
I hope to have it ready for the Diamondhead, MS steamup in a few weeks.
Have fun,
Tom
 
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