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After a rainy saturday with nothing to do, i now have 2 new flat cars & a home built logging skel.

Just need to add the finishing touches to them now.

Question is....

...how would a rustic 3' gauge logging operation secure their loads?

I have had a hunt on google, but none of the pics that i can find are very clear.

I have added stops on the outer edges of the skel, and i plan to add some tie down rings as well.

Would logs be chained / roped / just loose?

Would the flat cars have stops on their edges as well?

Any pics would be much appreciated, not too many full size prototypes to consult here in the UK!
 

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It depends to some extent on the exact equipment in use and the custom of the area in which the logging is done.

In the far west where giant trees were initially available, one log was a load ... these were most often transported on disconnects or log bunk flats and quite often no chains were used.

In both east and west for loads of smaller logs, the log bunk (or disconnect) saddle for holding logs was augmented with chain to keep logs from moving. In the east, the chain was tightened by reserving the last log till the chain was snugged by hand, then setting the log on the top to tighten the chain further. I have never seen a photo which showed this practice in use in the west where a ratchet arrangement seems to have been the more normal approach. Again, this may be due to the logs being larger generally on the west coast..

Regular flat cars (with stakes) were seldom used in the lumber business for moving logs but were the usual choice along with gons for moving either cordwood or small logs for pulp or charcoal/chemical production. Especially in the east and American midwest, pulp and charcoal were major businesses even after all the big trees were initially logged off for timber. Pulp and paper in particular continues to this day as a major customer of railroads in both the movement of logs and the shipment of chemicals in and finished paper out.

Regards ... Doug
 

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You can buy G-scale chain from Ozark Miniatures one of our sponsors here. It may or may not be already blackened. But yes, logs were secured to their respective cars with chain and a levered tensoner.
 

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About 20 years ago I built these HO log cars. I was "doing it on the cheap." I used Athearn boxcar frames for the basic skeleton frame. I used code 100 rail for the Barnhart loader track. I used trucks left over after converting some AHM Grass River RR Barnhart loader log cars to Kadee couplers, and some brake wheels - also Athearn parts - I think. I used chain from my daughters' broken costume necklaces for the log chains. To keep the chains taunt, I hid coiled tensioning springs on the underside of the frame. My digital camera is not that good, but you can just see them in the second photo.







You can do something similar in large scale. The tensioning springs should probably be slightly larger. Springs like that can probably be found in the Micro Mark catalog. The chains and slack adjusters can go above the frame, and the real work can be done by the springs under the frame.

Just a thought.

Yours,
David Meashey
Roanoke, VA
 

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Hi,

When studying old pictures of the logging industrie, e.g. from the Darius Kinsey collection, I seldom see securing chains on log loads.
They have adjustable logging bunks and the logs seem to stay in place by pure friction and gravity.





Huge single logs were held in place with smaller logs at the bottom








In Europe, where logging lines are mainy on 750/760 or 600mm gauge, they use trucks with foldable stakes.





The stakes were secured by chains, when folded up.

One problem with using real wood is the weight. One of this huge logs weighs about two (US) pounds. There are not many locos offered, which can pull long rakes of this loaded wagons. If you go to Chris Walas homepage, he wll teach you there, how to make lightweight logs brom blue foam.


Have Fun

Fritz / Juergen





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when i need chains, i go to the drugstore.
many rubber-teats for babies come with chains.
after being coloured with felt tipped markers they look fine.
 

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Hi,

Over here they are selling all kinds of chains at the hardware shops for about 2 Euro for a Meter. If I need finer ones, I visit the model ship shop.



For rope, the rusty stuff in the above picture, I use a pipe cleaner and burn the fur off. Loks good on loco bells or whistles.

Have Fun

Fritz / Juergen
 

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Fritz, nice tip on the pipe cleaners, thanks! Also, nice info above on the folding stakes and the smaller logs holding the larger log in place. Makes perfect sense but I don't think I would have thought of that on my own. I would have to question your selection of a particular logger in that first photo above, could cause some distractions and get other loggers killed ;-)
 

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Well, don´t worry about the hamster. The loggers are accustomed to his presense. The young lady is a diver, as you can tell by her googles. Just in case a logger falls into the pond. I think, the fishes about 50 or 60 of them out of th water every day.

Here is a pair French logging trucks on the unusual gauge of 700 mm (approx 2 feet, 4 inches)



As a matter of fact, the line was built after the Fanco-Prussian War 1871. The Germans had occupied that part of France (Alsace) until 1918.
Today it is a 20km museum line.

Have Fun

Otter 1 / Juergen
 

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Nomis,

The book Minnesota Logging Railroads by Frank A. King has hundreds of photos of logging trains from the turn of the last century. In every case the logs are chained to the cars. Here's two examples.






Ozark Minitures has great chains and chain parts, tools for logging. I used these parts to secure this flatbed load:


Dave
 
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