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Hey Guys,
I have just completed the overhead layout in my basement and it came out great. Before I fasten the track down, I want to put a safety on the track switch I am using to prevent derailments if the switch is thrown the wrong way. I am using a manual LGB switch. Can anybody tell me the easiest way to accomplish this? Thanks for your help.
 

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I would use a micro-switch attached to the board that is holding the turnout and is tripped by the turnout being thrown one way or the other ......

the switch then kills power to a length of rail that is just long enough to keep a train from going thu the turnout .....

I.E. the track is dead when the turnout is thrown against it becouse one rail is dead .......
 

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The LGB manual switch machines are designed for LGB engines and trains to go through even if it is thrown in the wrong direction. They are spring loaded and will move as the train traverses the switch. I have never had any problems with LGB engines and cars traversing one of these if it is thrown for the other direction. The deep flanges of the LGB trucks may be part of the reason that they traverse switches in the wrong direction. I cannot say the same for other manufacturers. The solution to the problem is to put weight into any cars that might derail. Metal wheels will usually solve the problem. Steam engines with a pony trucks are the biggest problem. You might need to add a stronger spring on the leading truck if that becomes a problem.


At train shows I have set up a loop with a passing siding using gaps and diodes. One switch is set for straight and the other is set for curve. The two trains are set up to run in opposite directions. In order to complete their loop, they must go through a closed switch. The track is set up so that if I change polarity on the track when a train is between the switches the other train starts in the opposite direction. I have run this for hours with out a derailment. The key is the spring loaded manual machines. They always return the switch to the correct direction. This will not work outdoors. The springs loose the ability to return if left outside. This might be dirt, but it could also be corrosion.



Chuck N
 
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Can anybody tell me the easiest way to accomplish this?

the easiest way might be to connect a small bar to the switchbar, opposite the manual switch.
if that additional bar has a contact piece, and slides over two contacts below it, you would have a simple way to give electricity just to the track, the turnout is switched to.
 
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