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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was in Home Depot this morning and saw two table saws by ridgid. I always liked thier tools.

My problme is....... is there that much differance between the contractors table saw and the big shop saw.

The only real differance I see is the RIP FENCE.

The Rip fence on the shop saw is beefier.

Any one got any experieance on these two?
 

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Don't know about there table saws JJ. But they sure did make a nice calender for there dealers years ago. Wish I was still on there mailing list.
 

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John,

Check out the movement and ease of setting the two fences. A good fence is as important as a sharp blade to get good results. A quality fence can easily cost $300 or so if you need a better one on the contractor saw. Factor that into the added cost for the cabinet saw. Of course if portability is a factor then the contractor saw might serve you better.

Also check the horsepower. My Delta Unisaw has a 3hp motor. The standard on contractor's saws is 1-1/2hp. I have seen them with 2hp. The extra "zip" is a real plus when doing a lot of ripping. I had an old Rockwell 10" contractor's saw that worked fine as long as I didn't cut too much at one time. When it got too hot it would let me know by popping the breaker in the middle of a cut. The old fence was very time consuming to set accurately as well. I'm sure the fences made now are far better than what I had but I mention it to highlight the fact that you don't get a free lunch.

I don't believe in buying tools for "occasional" use as though quality doesn't matter if you're only going to use the machine now and then. I feel if the job is worth doing its worth doing as right as you are capable of. Otherwise why bother? Too, quality tools are more pleasurable to use, safer and encourage a person to take on additional projects thus increasing your skill level.

Just some things to consider. Nothing earth shattering. The decision is of course up to you. Sorry I don't have any direct experience with Rigid's saws.
 

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JJ,
I did quite a bit of "shopping" before I bought one like this:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00922124000P
It has one of the best fences available.
The Biesmeyer fence costs upwards of $300-$400 by itself, but is extemely accurate.
Watch for them to go on sale about every 3 to 4 months...
It also has lots of power.
 

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JJ, I have used the Ridged benchtop saw 10 inch, which I am assuming is the same as the contractors saw minus the stand. It cut farely well for a while onk white oak then kicked the breaker. If I were in the market I would buy a Dewalt 10" with the rack-n-pinion fence I used that one too and really liked it. I currently have a Makita 10" which is a great saw and does not bog down but the fence sucks and i use a after market fence by rouseu which makes it really nice.

Choice is yours
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The bad thing about Home Depot is they dont have one out of the box any more so you can't play with it. That sucks. I was over at Lowes and played with some of thiers.
 

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Well...then...I'd ask em to open a box. They have them on display in my store here in Escondido. Great saw...it cut a LOT of wood this past week.
 

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John J,
I was aksing about them here and ended up buying the heavier of the two saws two years ago now. I love it! The fence is great for the price. I took the time to set up the motor and when set up it was within +/- 0.005 inches. The motor once running is deadly quiet and the blade that came with the saw is beyond decent for what I've been cutting so far. My complaints would be lack of avaialble accesories at HD. Like a new blade insert or extra switch safety keys. It's not a huge issue yet but a concern eventually. If you are going to move it around a LOT get the lighter saw but I was not as impressed with it's fence.

Chas
 

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Someone please correct me if I'm wrong. The bench top saws are usally motorized. Basically a skil saw mounted up side down.
I've always felt that there is some side to side play in the blade because of this. This would effect the quality of the cut.
Years ago I built a set of cherry cabinets with a benchtop saw.
I would clea the edges with a jointer

Contractor saws are usually belt driven and the weight of the motor provides the belt tension by a hinged moounting bracket.
These saws usually have a cast iron table/top. The weight of the top will dampen vibration.

Saws like my old unisaw have multiple drive belts, constant tension and the base of my saw is also castiron, hardly any
vibration.

I like the looks of some of these new bench top saws.
I always try to buy the best quality that i can afford.
But I feel that craftsmanship comes from the the crafsman and not the tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The reason I am concidering RIDGID is they have a website.

I have had several RIDGID shop vac's. What's cook about them is I can go on line and order the filters for them and have them delivered to the house.

So if you want extra stuff you can order it on line.

So many times I have gone to Home Depot and others and forgot to pick up the filter.

The website takes care of this problem
 

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I purchased a Delta tablesaw a few years ago. It isn't a contractors saw nor a cabinet saw but a model in between the 2. I like it and use it a lot. The only problem is i didn't researce it all that much and it turned out that the model I got was a few years old and most of the accessories weren"t available. In particlual the outfall table extension. i have since built my own outfall table but it was a pain. From now on I research things out and geet everything at once so i know I have it. As for tools, I like the Delta and Rigid. i don't like and won't buy Ryobi, Their parts are hard to find and their service is crap. I have a Ryobi planner that is only a couple of years old and I can't get blades for it period. Checked with the local Ryobi parts store and they never made any. Home Depot owns Rigid tools by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ryobi also makes printing presses. A 20 inch and a 28 inch. The jury is still out on how good they are. Longevity is in question
 

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Havign bought a delta Mortising tool last summer (used) I had a huge problem finding parts for it. Delta of course sold out recently to B&D and they had nothing in stock and could not get anything. All I needed was the chuck key but none were to be had. After I got the original seller to cough up a chuck key I started looking for Mortising bits. Couldn't get them either! I literally burned up the one that came with the tool. Since then I've grabbed many bits online at ridiculously low prices. At the time however they were rarer than hens teeth!

Chas
 

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Speaking of Hollow chisel mortisers, I bought a delta a cople of years ago, mainly to make cabenet face frames.
I also bought a Delta tenoning jig. I have had good luck with them. I've built a couple timber frame barns
so I got the idea to do a 1:20 scale timber frame using the mortiser, granted the 1/4 mortise is unprototypically large but once pegged and glued the frame was quite strong. I used 1/2 square cherry
posts and beams. Round tooth picks made nice pegs (trunnels).
 
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