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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Here they are - plenty of photos:

http://1stclass.mylargescale.com/jerrymccolgan/Caboose%20Move/


I put them into a separate directory so they can be viewed in the sequence they were taken. I've never seen photos or heard of a caboose being moved this way but it worked out very well with no damage to the caboose in the process.

Since the forum rules are such that photos posted on the forum give the forum administration certain rights to those photos (which I agree with) I think it is better that the photos are kept separate from the forum so there can be no question about my retaining all rights to the photos.

If anyone has any questions about any part of the move feel free to ask and I will try to clear up anything that seems unclear.

Regards,

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
My favorite photo. You could call this "The one that got away."

This is the UP Caboose at Ward, Arkansas. I was unsuccessful in getting either Ward or Jacksonville to part with their cabooses.



I could not resist getting a photo of my caboose as it passed the Ward Caboose.

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
This is the Jacksonville Caboose and it represents what is happening to cabooses all across the country. This is what motivated us to buy the Cabot Caboose (to protect it from such a future):







Jacksonville was also unwilling to consider selling their caboose preferring to keep it with hopes of eventual restoration.

The employees of Union Pacific had donated their labor and UP donated the materials to repaint this caboose just a few years ago.

Jerry
 

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Jerry,
Those pics are great! Being able to watch the progress of the move step by step is very interesting. Having a "real" piece of RR history is every RR'ers dream. Plus you get to preserve a piece of history. That is so sad to see what vandals can do. They've got nothing better to do than destroy something that doesn't belong to them. Congrats on your purchase and "thank you" for taking this step to keep history alive!
I do however have a question, how far did you have to have it trailered to get to your house?

Thanks again, and good luck with this project!

Paul
 

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Jerry

That was a very interesting way of moving a heavy item, the one part that really had me shaking my head was the use of the smaller flatbed trucks to hold up the respective caboose ends when loading and unloading, really quite sharp. Thanks for giving access to the photographs they were very interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Posted By Steamnutt on 01/24/2009 6:57 AM
Jerry,
Those pics are great! Being able to watch the progress of the move step by step is very interesting. Having a "real" piece of RR history is every RR'ers dream. Plus you get to preserve a piece of history. That is so sad to see what vandals can do. They've got nothing better to do than destroy something that doesn't belong to them. Congrats on your purchase and "thank you" for taking this step to keep history alive!
I do however have a question, how far did you have to have it trailered to get to your house?

Thanks again, and good luck with this project!

Paul



Hi Paul,

You are most welcome.

The caboose was 6 miles from the school grounds to our home and the route they took was a few miles further (they could never have made the turn into our driveway via the short route).

When I first thought about this project I counted over 50 power lines etc. that were hanging low over the road on the short route. The PVC piping on the top of the caboose was put there to guide the power lines over the top of the cupola. Unfortunately I had to let them cut the chimney off but it was badly damaged to begin with so would probably have had to be replaced anyway (I just don't know how I will do it - or for that matter how to get the new 350 lb wood burning stove into the caboose).

While the restoration is just at the beginning of a new project, finding, convincing the school district to sell the caboose, successfully bidding on it and then and getting the caboose here has been a 4 year project with never a great expectation of success.

Jerry

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Posted By SteveC on 01/24/2009 7:58 AM
Jerry

That was a very interesting way of moving a heavy item, the one part that really had me shaking my head was the use of the smaller flatbed trucks to hold up the respective caboose ends when loading and unloading, really quite sharp. Thanks for giving access to the photographs they were very interesting.



Hi Steve,

I had to see it to believe it. I just could not imagine how they were going to move it and was dreading my anticipated use of jacks to lift it up expecting significant damage from it.

The alternative of hiring a huge crane capable of lifting a 40-50,000 lb caboose plus flatbed trailers, semi's etc. to haul it was cost prohibitive. I'd been advised I could probably not move it for less than $10k which made it a non-starter. The school people told me that it had cost them $6-$8,000 just to move it a couple of blocks several years ago.

They accomplished the move with 3 flatbed trucks, a tractor trailer and miscellaneous other items. The work was done by 5-6 men and it was obvious the boss knew exactly what he were doing. His dad helped the first day and told me he has been doing this for 50 years.

I thought it was super slick to make rails out of 6" x 6"s to roll the wheels out and later back under the caboose and then to use those 6" x 6"'s to create a "road" over the rails and ties to drive the tractor (truck) pulling the caboose over them to position the caboose where the wheels could be reinstalled.

Jerry
 

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Jerry

Yes, it just goes to show that there are still plenty of people around that know how to use what they've got to the maximum and don't require the latest in technology to accomplish things. Hey, you can now claim that your new rolling stock had at one time operated on a pole road, albeit for a very short time.


I had to have a tree service take out a dead pine tree (i.e. took lightning three hits to kill it), anyway the tree was in the back and the only way was with a crane going over the house. When the set up to spot the crane they used heavy timbers to block the sidewalk and keep from cracking it to pieces. After the crane was spotted and set in, one guy rode the headache ball up, then secured the sling just below the branches. Then set his lines and came down about one third the height of the tree, they tensioned the cable, he made the cut and over the house went the tree top. Two more cuts, one taking the next third, and the last about 2" above the ground and that part was done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Posted By SteveC on 01/24/2009 8:45 AM
Jerry

Yes, it just goes to show that there are still plenty of people around that know how to use what they've got to the maximum and don't require the latest in technology to accomplish things. Hey, you can now claim that your new rolling stock had at one time operated on a pole road, albeit for a very short time.





Hi Steve,

I am always impressed when someone comes up with a way of doing something that works and never occurred to me to do it that way.

The first thing I've got to do is to get rid of the "battery power" (12 Volt DC system) and convert the caboose to 120 Volt AC. I can't have anyone accusing me of having a battery powered caboose - even though I did think about doing it just for the heck of it).

As with my layouts a battery system would not work in the caboose in that I could hardly power a MIG welder with a 12 volt battery.
I need the welder to re-weld the triangular plates (stops) to the rails to prevent the caboose from rolling off the rails. My wife does not like to get into the caboose because she is concerned that it could roll.

Actually I will probably install a 12 volt battery in the caboose to power the crossing signals.

I once saw where someone had built a garden gauge layout with hand made wood tracks so I guess he could now claim my caboose has made wooden tracks prototypical.


Cheers,

Jerry
 

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Jerry:

When I saw the pictures of the "Ward" and "Jacksonville" UP cabooses a light bulb went off in my head. Looking in my train photos I found a "sister" caboose just outside of Walden, CO. It is # UP 25408 and in pretty good shape. I just checked with Google maps and found in with the Satallite images and zoomed in with the street view so it is still there. Not far off number wise from the Jacksonville caboose. I have a pretty decent picture of it and I could email to you if you wanted. The windows are slightly different but no graffiti.
 

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My wife does not like to get into the caboose because she is concerned that it could roll.



Does the caboose not have a hand brake? If so just crank the brake down and it will be fine! If not, I would go with your idea. You'd be amazed at how little effort it takes to get a railcar rolling. Got any caboose keys or locks yet? I'm sure you could find at least an old MP caboose key, and maybe get someone to make you a lock to work with the key.

Enjoy the project.
Craig
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Posted By jamarti on 01/24/2009 3:26 PM
Jerry:

When I saw the pictures of the "Ward" and "Jacksonville" UP cabooses a light bulb went off in my head. Looking in my train photos I found a "sister" caboose just outside of Walden, CO. It is # UP 25408 and in pretty good shape. I just checked with Google maps and found in with the Satallite images and zoomed in with the street view so it is still there. Not far off number wise from the Jacksonville caboose. I have a pretty decent picture of it and I could email to you if you wanted. The windows are slightly different but no graffiti.



Yes, we would like to get a photo of the other UP caboose. We are finding cabooses to be an interesting subject as we try to figure out what everything does and what the differences are.

Thanks,

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Posted By bnsfconductor on 01/24/2009 5:15 PM
My wife does not like to get into the caboose because she is concerned that it could roll.



Does the caboose not have a hand brake? If so just crank the brake down and it will be fine! If not, I would go with your idea. You'd be amazed at how little effort it takes to get a railcar rolling. Got any caboose keys or locks yet? I'm sure you could find at least an old MP caboose key, and maybe get someone to make you a lock to work with the key.

Enjoy the project.
Craig





Hi Craig,

Unfortunately I had to disconnect and remove the brake rods to prepare the caboose for shipping (the brake rods had to be removed to release the truck when the caboose body was lifted). In the process I discovered that some of the brake rods were never connected when the caboose was last moved and the pins to connect them are missing so I'll have to find replacements for those pins before I can connect the brakes. I do want to get the brakes working again if only for the realism of it.

I have the original locks but replaced them with Yale locks that I have keys to. The original locks do not seem to be adjustable which makes me wonder if all caboose keys may be the same. I will have keys made and replace the original locks when done.

The good news is that a friend of my son-in-law came by today and welded the stops back to the rails so the caboose is now unable to move forward or backward. He used my welder but he knows what he is doing with a welding machine while I do not. I figured that to hold a 50,000 lb caboose in place it called for a welder who knew what he was doing.

What is interesting is that I spend a lot of time in the caboose before it was moved and it was rock solid. Now, after the move, the caboose has a noticeable tendency to rock very slightly side to side. it is only noticeable if doors are left open because they tend to squeak slightly with the movement. i suspect the rocking will stop once the caboose settles down on the springs.

Today I managed to wire a temporary circuit panel in the caboose so we now have electricity to run heat, lights, welder etc.

Tomorrow I plan to get the telephone wires connected.

Slowly but surely the caboose is improving.

Regards,

Jerry
 

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Jerry,
If you have access to an appliance cart with a strap, you should be able to get your stove inside by using one of these. With the help of a couple folks, you should be able to take it right up the steps on the caboose.

Hope this helps
Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Posted By Steamnutt on 01/24/2009 7:05 PM
Jerry,
If you have access to an appliance cart with a strap, you should be able to get your stove inside by using one of these. With the help of a couple folks, you should be able to take it right up the steps on the caboose.

Hope this helps
Paul


That is a good idea and one I may try soon.

Yesterday afternoon with 4 halogen lights and a small electric heater the caboose warmed up nicely. This morning I went to the caboose about 5:30 am and turned on the lights and heater (it was 28 degrees outside). I started to think that the wood burning stove could wait until next winter.

After 2 hours it still felt like it was about 28 degrees inside the caboose!

My original thoughts that heating a huge steel caboose would require a lot of heat seem to be turning out to be correct. My wife had wondered why I wanted a wood burning stove rated at 1,500 square feet but with a steel caboose surrounded by woods (free fuel) I think it was the smart thing to do. Besides, a caboose would not look right without a working chimney. Now I've got to figure out how to get the chimney replaced.

Jerry
 
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