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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
   Mine came today so I still need time to lay it,but as was  stated on another forum the track is just a hair wider (maybe 1/64) than A/C so you may have to file down the inside edge if joining to other makes. You will also have to spread your joiners a tad, unless you use split jaw type clamps. It does come with 2 extra sections of ties and I will assume (and you know what that does) that you can use these to fill in the spaces near the joints when you lay the track.
   I would also like to say that the box of 12 six foot lengths ships at 39 lbs. which seems a little lighter than others to me.So maybe they are using a differant fomula for their brass?


   Hope this helps      Dave
 

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Thanks Dave, let us know what you think when you begin to lay track.

I would assume that the "springyness" or "flexability" of the track would also be indicative of a different alloy of brass than we see in the other brands. A weight difference wouldn't be a suprise if that's the case.

When it comes to joining the track.. if you use a split jaw type clamp, wouldn't that align the inside faces of the rails? Even if there is a 1/64" difference in the rail width, wouldn't that show up on the outside of the rail?
Also, wouldn't you really only need to do any filing or fiddling at joints with other brands, basicaly just on one or two joints? Joining AML to AML should pose no issues at all.

Thanks for the report. I look forward to hearing more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dave ,
I think the springyness is more the way the ties are made with alternating gaps under the rails. The split jaws may or may not align the track but filing the first 2 to 3 inches at the end would only take a couple of minutes and not hurt anything.And yes only when connecting to other brands.Like I said though check for that other post on track for more info.
Dave
 

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Just my opinion, but I would be concerned about laying any track that is 'under tension', that is sprung into position, then held down by securing the plastic ties.

Plastic is just that: PLASTIC. That means the material can and will deform over time. Consider that the ties and especially the spike heads will be under continuous sideways force from the sprung rail, and I believe you are asking for failures of the spike heads and / or ties. This potential is exacerbated where the radius is sharper and by high outdoor temperatures. This failure might take a long time, but the threat is there.

Single rail benders are relatively inexpensive. Simply bending each rail to the approximate finished shape will relieve the pressure on the ties and spikes, thus helping to lengthen the life of the expensive track. It will also enhance smooth rail to rail connections by requiring less force on the joiners.

Happy RRing,

Jerry
 
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