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Just a few thoughts, now it's mostly finished.
Rather than deal with Google translate, I used the English instructions from www.gardenrailways.co.uk


The steam line from the reversing valve does not resemble the one in the pictures. That's fine it was prebent but a tad long.


The exhaust line was it bit short and fouled the tab for the boiler hold down screw. I moved the hold down screw to the front of the smoke box where it's easier to reach.


You might leave the trucks off till the end, I had to keep taking off to reach things.


There a few, if any, spare screws so be careful.


Other than that it's a great kit and runs really well.


I added the details to the smoke box front, it looked really bare.


Harvey C.
SA 1838
 

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Thanks Harvey, I didn't realize there were English instructions! I built mine just looking at the pictures.

I am still testing it. Overall I really enjoyed the kit. That said, mine seems to run a bit better in reverse than in forward. I think this may be due to the reversing bar not moving forward enough but I have not had time to test that.

Will post some pictures of the build in a few days. Looking forward to watching it meander around the layout
 

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Way to go Harvey!
I decided not to get this kit as I still have to get the Shay (after all these years) running well. The insights you have given me will be a big help.
Congrats on another loco build. Let's have some videos of it running. You too Kevin.
Best regards,
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Now that you mention it, I had to take the lock nut off the reverser piston to get enough travel to get it to run well in both directions



Harvey C
 

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Mine looks like that too - a big box of wrapped parts.


I have ordered the r/c kit. While Jason calls it "R/C Ready", there's actually a kit of parts that Graham at https://www.gardenrailways.co.uk/ [Harvey - your link is not working] has on his list.
https://www.gardenrailways.co.uk/regner-heisler-locomotive.html
I emailed to ask what was included.

The R/C kit comprises of a replacement reversing rod to connect to a servo (the reversing arm in the cab and the existing reversing rod are removed). 2 servos, 1 servo bracket mount for the regulator, a replacement R/C regulator arm plus the control rod and connectors. A replacement bunker cover with the cut outs for the switch and charger socket and an assembled wiring loom including the switch and charger socket.
You will need to find the rechargeable batteries, transmitter and receiver, they are not included.

The price from the UK is about $60.
 

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Regner Heisler

Thanks to all for postings re the Regner Heisler. My Aster BR-5 is about done and looking for another project to start!
 

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Are the wheels pressed onto the axles or held on by a set screw? I can't imagine that it's terribly easy to get all eight wheels quartered properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The wheels are held with set screws. Quartering was a matter of trial and error and error and...


Harvey C.
 

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Are the wheels pressed onto the axles or held on by a set screw? I can't imagine that it's terribly easy to get all eight wheels quartered properly.

The wheels have angled set-screws (grub screws) and the axles are round with no flats. This diagram tells you the essence of qusrtering. Getting to the point where each side runs freely and is at 90 degrees to the other side will be trial-and-error, based on the (english) instructions I got from the UK.





 

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The wheels are held with set screws. Quartering was a matter of trial and error and error and...

Harvey C.
In my experience, you can feel when the rods bind as you turn the wheels by hand. Then adjust a tiny amount and try again. And again . . Don't tighten the gear until you are happy with the rod angles.

The quartering doesn't have to be exactly 90 degrees - 92 works just as well, as long as the rods don't bind - i.e. the wheels are at the same angle on both axles.
 

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Today I added the wheels and quartered them. No problems - didn't even have to fiddle; it worked first time. The spokes are such that you can see from the back when a spoke is at 12 o'clock.



I've had more of a problem with clearances. Test fitting the wheels and checking the gauge resulted in the wheels being far too tight on the frame - and Graham's instructions warn you to leave room for when it all gets hot.



I ended up sanding the paint and the edges off the back of the wheels using a sheet of 320 emery flat on the bench. I even smoothed the washers (!) and rubbed down the side of the frames, though I was trying not to make anything visible. (2 wheels done on this pic, the other is just getting started.)

 

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Intesting that the Heisler had quarter turn on the cranks - there doesn't appear to be any mechanical reason when its a geared loco. I guess they just followd conventional practice for quartering.
 

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Intesting that the Heisler had quarter turn on the cranks - there doesn't appear to be any mechanical reason when its a geared loco. I guess they just followd conventional practice for quartering.
Ah, but it is not. Only geared on the front axle - the rods drive the other. Therefore 90 degrees (+/-) is needed.
What I find weird is that they like the front truck and the back truck to be "in phase" - both trucks on one side should be at 12 when the other side are both at 9. Not sure why!
 

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they like the front truck and the back truck to be "in phase"
Apparently that's how the full-sized ones came from the factory, although as you point out, there's really no mechanical reason to have the trucks synchronized that way. In fact, as Heislers were shopped during their (often long) service lives, the two (or three) trucks would sometimes get out of sync with one another. No indication that I'm aware of that this had any effect on performance.
 

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Pete, even with only one axle geared per truck, the quatering is irrelevant. The cranks can be set at any angle (so long as they're consistently the same on all cranks).
The quatering comes from direct piston design, where one side is always in power stroke, when the other side is at end of stroke.

David.
 

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David
Correct except that if both sides were the same, the side rods would go over center and lock up.
The closest to 90 degrees, the more stable they are.

In trucks with multiple drive shafts, the "U" joints need to be aligned (timed) or it will create a vibration and excess wear.
 

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Pete, even with only one axle geared per truck, the quatering is irrelevant. The cranks can be set at any angle (so long as they're consistently the same on all cranks).
The quatering comes from direct piston design, where one side is always in power stroke, when the other side is at end of stroke.

David.
Hm. I understand the direct drive issue, but in my experience any rod-driven pair of wheels will need some degree of quartering. If both rods are at the same position, then you will be relying on the rolling of the wheels to make sure they don't bind. Should the driven wheel slip, you could get a situation at 9 o'clock where the front axle is at 9+ and the other is at 9-. Won't that cause a bind?
 
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