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Senior Dish Washer
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3,203 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK

This is probably a dumb question for most of you, but what is the best way to clean the wax off the AristoCraft track screws?

Maybe heat the wax with a grill starter flame and then spray some brake cleaner to clean any wax residue off the screws.

Also, what kind of solder should I use if I decide to solder the joints together?

Thanks
 

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Super Modulator
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20,525 Posts
I roll them between my fingers, and turn them with the driver. Most all wax will break off. Then I take the point of an X-acto knife and just give it a quick twist.

Getting all the wax off is not really necessary, it helps lube the threads.

You will need a large soldering iron, and use rosin-core solder. I am assuming you have brass track.

Regards, Greg
 

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Premium Member
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436 Posts
If you decide to solder the joints, I would suggest you use jumper wires instead...I did this more than 6 or 7 years ago and have had zero electrical problems, and it's easy to just cut the wires if you decide to change or move the track, I use split jaw clamps at all switches to allow easy removal of the switches for repair and use jumper wires across the switches as the switches are the weak link in the rail carrying electricity....check out my How-to web page "Soldering track jumpers".
 

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Premium Member
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965 Posts
I take a small screwdriver to remove the screws/wax. The screws are placed on a piece of cardboard. A hair dryer or heat gun then melts off the wax, which is absorbed by the cardboard.
If there is a small bit of residual wax in the hex socket, it will help keep the screw on the driver.
JimC.
 

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Premium Member
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428 Posts
The Aristo track solders very nicely using 60/40 Rosin Core Solder. I used a liquid soldering flux on the joiner and track before using the solder on my Aristo sectional track. I used a small butane fired torch to heat the brass track and then touched the solder to the hot track and joiner. This melted the solder causing it to flow into the joint. I tightened all of the joiners first by pinching them first using pliers, making them so tight that I had to carefully tap them on the end of the track using a small hammer. This made for a tight fit of the joiners on the track and I ended up not using the screws at all. I soldered anywhere between 3 and 5 sections together and then connected those sections using Hillman Clamps. That was 4 years ago and I have had no problems.


Russ Miller 
 

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Senior Dish Washer
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the tips.

I picked the wax off two screws and attached two pcs of track together while sitting on the couch watching a movie. The wax came off the screws much easier than I had expected. While the allen screws stayed on the driver this time without loosing any, I'll wait to work on the rest at the table so I don't loose any. Being that this current layout is temporary, I'll be using jumper wires in place of soldering the joints.
 

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Premium Member
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I picked up a small pot at goodwill cheap and just boil them ......

then let it cool and the wax is on top of the water and the screws are in the bottom ......
 

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I just chip it off with a tiny screwdriver.
 
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