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Super Modulator
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Sure sounds (no pun intended) right. What address does the unit respond to after that?

If it is the short address, I would investigate what is actually in the decoder, on a programming track. If it's the long address, the CV29 operation is in question.

I think the answer to the first question will lead to what the problem is.

Will be interesting. I could also try simulating this myself this weekend if it's helpful. I know the QSI guys pretty well, and if there is a bug, they will fix it.

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,033 Posts
The programmer comes with everything you need except a computer, a locomotive, and wires from the programmer to the programming track. It comes with it's own power supply...

Regards, Greg
 

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Super Modulator
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21,033 Posts
Bert:
Ahh. So the only problem was changing the address on the programming track? programming on the main works fine then if I am reading your response right.
I will try the programming track on my NCE system to see if I can "See" the bug. I know the QSI guys will want to fix it.

Mike:

You are confusing DCC components with the QSI programming hardware.

DCC:

In DCC, you have a number of components, normally:
a power supply
a command station (which formats the DCC commands)
a booster (which combines the power with the DCC commmands and puts them on the rails)
a throttle (which tells the command station what commands you want)

Sometimes the above components are packaged together, but ALL FOUR functions exist.

To program a decoder in a loco:

You can use POM "Programming On the Main (line), where you have your loco sitting on the layout, and you can program it.

There is also a special output on your DCC hardware to a dedicated "Programming Track". This is just 2 wires to an ISOLATED section of track. You can do more things here then via POM above. You can read back values, and if you don't remember the address of the loco, it does not matter.

now, the QSI people use some similar terminology:

The QSI "programmer" needs to be connected to it's OWN DEDICATED piece of track. They call this a "programming track", so that helps the confusion.

In addition, there are two software programs with the QSI. One is for downloading firmware to the decoder, changing sounds etc.

The other software package lets you configure the decoder, just like using the dedicated DCC programming track on your DCC system.

So, the whole thing is confusing if you are not familiar with DCC.

hope this helps,

Regards, Greg
 

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Premium Member
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68 Posts
Greg,

When I tried to use my NCE programming track (my preference for changing an address), my system could not "read" the decoder. Since I don't have a "booster" on my programming track, I concluded that the system did not have enough power to work properly. Since programming on the main works, I probably won't invest in a booster for my programming track.

Bert
 

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Super Modulator
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21,033 Posts
Right you are Bert, virtually ALL motor/sound decoders require a programming track booster. They are only about $45-$65 bucks, so I bought one, but have not had to use it yet.

I actually prefer changing the address via POM, but I have to be honest, I can't remember the last time I tried it on the programming track! Is it the same straightforward procedure, or do you need to calculate the CV's?

Regards, Greg
 

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Premium Member
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I recently upgraded from Sys 1 to NCE and as noted earlier I haven't been able to get the NCE programming track to read a QSI decoder. With Sys 1 and an NCE G decoder, I just input the long address and the system did all of the CV calculations. AFAIK NCE works the same way.

Bert
 
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