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Discussion Starter #1
 I've decided to build a rather large pulp and paper mill for the RR. If anybody has any decent pictures or ideas they'd like to share I'm all ears/eyes.  I want this mill to not use a log pond so getting the pulp logs into the mill is of the most interest at the moment.

 
Here's a picture of the track side fuel oil tank that's under construction, and that will feed the power plant for the mill as well as provide fuel for the shays.

 
 
 

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RE: Pulp & Paper mill ?

Larry,
I'm not sure about pulp mills but the PA logging book series (The Logging Railroad Era of Lumbering in Pennsylvania-a 13 volume series of paperbacks, some of which have been reprinted) shows a number of saw mills which have log decks built of timber onto which the logs are loaded from the log cars then hauled into the mill. They look like a series of beams perpendicular to the mill and the car to be unloaded set at the height of the car deck. Some have these the structure on both sides of the track for storage of the logs until they are needed in the mill.
Hope this might help you,
Tom
 

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Larry, in what era are you doing, there are a ton of paper mills in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and Wisconsin, these are more modern, just curious to see what your looking for.

tom h
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys. The tank is from an AMS Tank car (1:20.3)

Tom B., that's the way they load logs into the saw mill here that is owned by my my son's in-laws ....only they use log trucks to fill the feed system.


Tom H., call it 1940s 1950s, with 3 truck shays.
 

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A lot depends on the era you are modeling.

Here in Ottawa/Hull the E. B. Eddy Company used to have a huge pile of pulp logs behind the old Grind-wood Mill. The logs were cut in Northern Ontario and Quebec and floated down the Ottawa River. They were brought inside the mill on a simple conveyor, dropped down a chute through a heavy rubber curtain into a small waist high canal. The curtain didn’t stop those working the area from getting soaked when the logs jammed in the chute, and that old stone mill was cold and damp. It was their job to pole the logs along the canal to feed the grind stones that made pulp out the logs.

As decades passed, the concern about fire increased as the internal temperature of the log pile increased. In 1900, Hull and a good chunk of Ottawa had been destroyed in the Fire of 1900 which started in downtown Hull and was fueled by the old wooden paper and lumber mills in the same area.
http://www.biblioottawalibrary.ca/images/ottawa_room/fire_3.jpg


To solve the problem, the company bought a number of huge electric chippers. The logs were moved, fed through the chippers and a new pile of wood chips grew. It was scary to see how fast those chippers ate a pulp log.

As the years passed, Ottawa and Hull grew with E. B. Eddy stuck in between their increasing modern downtown areas. To break down the logs chips into pulp and whiten it for paper, the plant ran a sulphide mill. Anyone who has passed a large paper mill will be familiar with the rotten eggs smell it would generate. Having that smell waft over the Supreme Court, the Federal Parliament Buildings and other downtown businesses did not sit well with the either the Municipal or Federal Bureaucrats. There was ralk of movingthe plant, but as E. B. Eddy was a large employer a compromise was reached. The pulp was processed in other more remote mills and transported as laps by trucks, lots of trucks. The laps look like large white blankets folded on skids. After the wood chip pile was depleted, the sulphide mill was shut down.

E. B. Eddy also had a railway running through most of their sprawling plant. Little, green industrial locomotives would move cars between the different mills. As the cities around it grew however, rail lines in the downtown areas disappeared and most were replaced with roadways and buildings. Likewise Eddy’s industrial railway disappeared and the spur to the CP Rail was lifted.

Later the obsolete Grind-wood Mill was gutted and became the head-end for a new, fine paper mill across the street. Fine paper requires Kaolin which is usually moved by railway tank cars. The railway spur was put back in, and service was provided by the Quebec-Gatineau Railway, one of many short lines run by the Genesee & Wyoming.
 

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Addressing the question of getting logs to the pulp mill with out a log pond. What about a industrial line from the forest to the mill. With a connectin to the main line. Or even use he main line to haul the logs to the mill

It would be like having a a spur to the cattle ranch for cattle cars to haul beef to the packing house.
 

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The SPC used to have a spur running into James Lick's paper mill in Santa Clara. This is the same James Lick who financed the observatory atop Mount Hamilton that still bears his name. The railroad brought in pulp wood and took out the paper.

I did a quick Google search for Lick paper mill. Clicking on images provided this old post card...



This mill was built in the later half of the 19th century. Other images of more modern mills also came up.
 

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Good picture Dwight!

The water tower was also a prominent fixture on the E. B. Eddy property. The tank was painted green and had a white swan on it. White Swan was the name on many of their products like coloured toilet paper, paper towels, serviettes, etc. Coloured toilet paper! Am I dating myself?

Also prominent was a large chimney next to the steam plant.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RE: Pulp & Paper mill ?

Well I've been poking around online without much luck finding photos of what I'd call the log loading bay. Perhaps all the mills were located on water ways....seems odd though.
My RR will bring the logs to the plant and unloading into a log pile can be done with a log loader so perhaps the log loader can feed them into the mill as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
RE: Pulp & Paper mill ?

Agreed Dwight. But does that mean they built log ponds just to hold the logs. You can get plenty of water out of a river but the wood doesn't have to come by river. What do the modern mills do I wonder? They probably bring in the wood by rail or truck and just stack it and then use fork lifts to load it into the de-barker and chip buildings...at least that's my guess..
 

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Discussion Starter #16
RE: Pulp & Paper mill ?

Well I finally found info on the debarking process (with pics) so I can fake it from here. Thanks for the help.
 

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Larry

Don't know if any of these will fit what you're trying to do, did a search on the American Memory site and it returned 131 pages (20 records per page) of results. The following links are some examples, there photographs and drawings spanning various time frames and locations, note you may need to install a TIFF viewer for some of the pictures.

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031573pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031572pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031581pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031582pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031583pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031584pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031585pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031587pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031588pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031589pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031576pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/de/de0000/de0070/photos/031578pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/wi/wi0300/wi0323/photos/371741pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/wi/wi0300/wi0323/photos/371742pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/wi/wi0300/wi0323/photos/371743pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/wi/wi0300/wi0324/photos/371744pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00001r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00002r.tif[/url]
http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00002r.tif

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00003r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00004r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00005r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00006r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00007r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00008r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00009r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00010r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00011r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00012r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/sheet/00013r.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/photos/129019pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/photos/129018pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/habshaer/oh/oh0400/oh0424/photos/129022pv.jpg[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8a16000/8a16800/8a16838u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d18000/8d18400/8d18479u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d16000/8d16600/8d16665u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8c11000/8c11900/8c11931u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8c11000/8c11900/8c11964u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d16000/8d16600/8d16637u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d16000/8d16600/8d16636u.tif[/url]

[url]http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d16000/8d16500/8d16512u.tif[/url]
 

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RE: Pulp & Paper mill ?

Steve
The buildings in the first three links are still standing over in Newark DE. I have been past them many times on the road in the first photo.
Noel
 

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Hey Noel

That's neat, they don't ever say anything about the current status of any of the records on the American Memory site.
 

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Allen,
I like the looks of your link, but I can't figure out how to get from the index to the photographs. Can you explain, speaking slowly, using small words?


Thanks,
Matt
 
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