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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Super Chief set that comes with the DCS-200 and a 5amp power supply. I am not getting enough power on my track and I'd like to take advantage of the full 8amp capacity of the DCS-200 but I'll never be able to do that with my 5amp PS. Can someone please send me some links or recommend specific power supplies that I can purchase that are compatible with the DCS-200?

Thanks.
 
G

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When you say that you are not getting enough voltage to the track, under what conditions?

Have you measured your track voltage?

What is the voltage of the power supply? Is it AC or DC?

Have your shorted out your track with a screwdriver to see if the booster shuts down? You should never run the booster on a power supply with smaller capability than the booster itself. That my prevent proper overcurrent shutdown.

There is a voltage set switch on the front of the DCS200, make sure that it in the upward, or G scale, position. If that isn't enough and your power supply allows it, you can tweak it upward. See your manual for instructions.


I also use the Crest power supply on one layout. It is enough to get about 18 volts on the track, but not higher. If you want more, you'll need to get a higher voltage source. 18 VAC or 26 VDC will allow 22 volts on the track which is enough.


BTW, if you use the Crest power supply, DO NOT USE banana plugs on the output jacks. A banana plug is only reliable up to about 3 amps. Instead, clamp a heavy wire under the nut.
 

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Super Modulator
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George, not all banana plugs are created equal.

I use them successfully on my system.

Here's the first link in a google search:


http://www.alliedelec.com/Images/Products/Datasheets/BM/JOHNSON_COMPONENTS_INC/Johnson-Components-Inc_Interconnect-Wire-and-Cable_5280155.pdf

I think you will agree that allied electronics is a reputable distributor, and Johnson Components are trustworthy. The first couple of pages has their banana plugs rated at 15 amps.

I have some rated at 25 amps, but more plating and more money.


Regards, Greg

 
G

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those are the kind that gave us so much trouble at work. They may hold 15 amps for awhile, but they will eventually burn up. They are not allowed for currents past 3 amps on the test sets.
 

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Super Modulator
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I use ones that do not have springy sides, but turning the end expands and locks the plug into the hole.


You can see the pin in the center that expands the tip to lock it into the banana socket.

Regards, Greg
 

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Greg, great plugs, but what about the Aristo/Crest socket and its rating for banana plug use?

I would go with the screwed down terminal for best results.
 
G

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the problem with the conventional banana plug is the sideways spring contacts. They heat and lose their outward pressure, causing more heating and eventual total failure of the plug.

The Aristo jacks are fine. The plugs that Greg uses are much beefier than the more conventional banana plug and should be good for more current, I don't know how much.

Best to clamp a wire by threading it in the hole in the side of the jack on the Aristo power supply and clamping it down under the nut. The metal jack is the same chunk of metal for either a plug or a wire in the side so if the plug can actually handle high current without failing, it would be no worse than a wire in the side.
 

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Super Modulator
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I'd worry more about the soldering inside the power supply and the wiring than how much metal was in the socket.

I will say that I've been inside a couple of the Crest units, and they are beefy, but I've seen some wiring shortcuts in assembly that I did not like.

It's a simple visual inspection, and cheap insurance.

Regards, Greg
 
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