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I would like to convert my Daisy to battery power, Has any one done this, if so, how did you do it, Thanks papachaz
 

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I believe the porter named Daisy is a LGB small 2 axle steam engine possibly from the toy train line. Body style like the 22771.
The toy train line had many names for this little saddle tank engine. Helena, Rocky, Casey and even santa for some.
 

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My thought is that it would be tough to fit the battery and necessary components into one of these./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/shocked.gif The little thing needs a fair amount of weight to pull a load, and most of the room in the saddle tank is taken up by the factory-provided slug. A trailing car might be the answer. Considering that it was fairly common practice to put a short 4-wheel tender behind these Porters, you'd have a place to put the electronics and batteries, which you could then wire to the motor power leads through the receptacle on the boiler backhead. A little Hartland 4-wheel flat car would be a good starting point for the tender.;)

For those who are wondering what loco we're talking about, here's a shot of one I rebuilt as an 0-4-2T. From the cab forward, it's essentially what a "Daisy" looks like....

 

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From my experience, most of the LGB products are relatively easy to disassemble. Just keep taking out screws, lotsa scews. Just be sure you take photos/make notes on what goes where when you put them back together. One other technique I use is to put the screws back into the parts I've just removed. Then, when you reassemble them, the right screws are in the right place. LGB used adhesives in relatively few places, and thankfully, because they used really robust adhesives, they weren't in places you couldn't work around. The Porter, as I recall, only required me to break out the cab windows, and I only did that because I was creating an open plantation-style cab.
 

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who are wondering what loco we're talking about

Looks like my Mad Cow loco!

Can't help with the batteries - wife thought it was so cute she took it up to her office in the loft. Still there last time I took the hike upstairs.
 

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Encase you haven’t managed to get it apart I have a Lehmann “Rusty’ Porter I just picked up 2nd hand.

I had to pull it apart to replace the gears and motor, (the previous owner did not give it the love it required!) once she’s up and running again a visit to the paint shop will be required (for obvious reasons :) ).

She is still in pieces waiting on the parts, but I have put the major bits together so you can see what mine is for your reference.



It may not be exactly the same as yours but this is what I remember doing to get mine apart.

Unscrew the 6 screws into the cab from underneath and remove the cab
Unscrew the 4 screws holding the water tank on, remove the tank.
Unscrew the 2 screws from underneath next to the cylinders (not the two holding the front bar)

The boiler should now pull off with a bit of a wriggle.

To get to the motor unscrew the 2 screws on top of the chassis.

OR

If you only need to get into chassis to lube it you only need to undo the 4 screws on the bottom of the chassis to remove the bottom plate.

Hope this helps

Alan
 
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