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Discussion Starter #1
While I'm butting my head against the wall trying to find drivers for the scratchbuilt James model I'm working on (see "Aftermarket drivers, custom built gearboxes..."), I figured I'd cut up the LGB Stanz I bought for parts.



While I wasn't sure whether I wished to do another T.T.T.E. character (personally, I'd like to do a 1:29 MKO F40PH-2C), I decided that it wouldn't hurt to try my hand at Percy:























Ended up cutting the frame a bit short in front - quite apparent in these photos. Nothing that can't be fixed with some extra styrene, and I do intend to place another 0.10" section of styrene atop the footplates anyway.



Take care,



-Kurt
 

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Slick!

I've been thinking about scratching a couple Thomas' for the botanic. Would want to start with a real bullet proof drive, like maybe a Heartland Mac. Prolly won't ;)
 

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It seems to me getting the face right is the hard part. That's the main reason I went with a commercially made wooden pull toy when I made a Thomas for my daughter--I thought if the face was wrong it'd be a turn-off and would not look right to her. I can't sculpt to save my life
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That would be a long trip for your little boy to see Percy, Dave ;)



Incidentally, here is an earlier photo showing James and Percy - gives one a rough idea of the relative size between the two:







Trouble is (with Thomas models, anyway), building one to scale (to those of the TV series) usually ends up with a clash of appearance, the TTTE models being Gauge 1 or roughly equivalent. One can always fudge it, but in the case of these models, I've been attempting to replicate the TV models as accurately as I can.



As for faces, I do have a theory on how I intend to proceed - start with hardening modeling clay to create the base, smooth that out after it dries, then make a mold for a resin cast - and use the mold as an additional method to smooth out the face. Repeat as necessary.



I've already tried with simple non-hardening modeling clay for a one-off parody. Wasn't thrilled with it, but it sufficed:
 

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Posted By cudak888 on 09/17/2008 9:33 AM

I've already tried with simple non-hardening modeling clay for a one-off parody. Wasn't thrilled with it, but it sufficed:



 

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For the face, you might want to consider using a water-based sculpting epoxy putty. Plenty of time to work the material and it sands, drills, etc very well so you have all the opportunity to get the face right. Might save you all the work of making a mold if you're only wanting the one face.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Quick update:



Looks like it'll be one of those messy builds involving a good deal of sandpaper and putty...

-Kurt
 

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Hmm. I figured on polymer clay, but that epoxy sounds cool.
 
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