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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning all,


I apologize for the multiple posts, eventually; all of them will be consolidated and put into my builders log once the project is complete.


 


To start with, the drive rods as supplied from aristocraft were not the right shape so I had to make my own. On one of my previous builds, One of you suggested using English style bull head rail for drive rods, and that advice did not fall on deaf ears. I could not find any rail like that so I did the next best thing. I took a piece of aristocraft stainless steel rail and filed off the base to see how it would look.



Being happy with the results, I cut a couple of pieces to size, clamped them in my vice and file away.



I then glued a pattern on a two pieces of brass to be cut out the form the ends of the drive rod.






The parts were then silver soldered together.



Finally, I used an electroplating kit that I got from Micro Mark to plate the brass portion of the drive rods.



Here is an overall photo of the project so far.



Joel

Over the past two weeks I have been working on the front of the smoke box, had lamp, keystone, and drive rods.
 

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You're doing a great job of finding alternate materials for difficult parts, Joel.  That was a great idea for modifying some SS rail to make connecting rods.

Llyn
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The rivets on the face of the smoke box are made from thin slivers of round styrene rod cut by hand. I’ve tried using "the chopper" but found I could do a better job by just free handing it.


The large rivets on the smoke box wrapper were embossed using a nail chucked into my drill press. The finer, smaller rivet heads were done by hand using an compass point and cardboard as a backer.


You can see my riveting arrangement in my Berkshire builders log posted below.

www.mylargescale.com/Features/BuildersLogs/tabid/66/EntryID/16/Default.aspx


Joel
 

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Somewhere along the line I missed how you made that wonderful little keystone in the front. Could you possibly elaborate on it a bit?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good morning all,


I spent the last couple of days working on the locomotive cab and it turned out to be and easier project than I thought it would be.


I first cut out the front and back of the cab and glued them together to make a box.


I then cut out a paper template for the sides and roof and test fitted it in place. Once everything fit right, I used the template to make the piece in styrene.



I then used the sharp end of a compass to emboss rivets on the plastic and cut out the window openings with an exacto knife.




I have also finished the window frames which I thought was the most time consuming part of the project.


Here is how it looks so far.







I almost forgot, the keystone was made out of a sheet of styrene plastic cut on a band saw. I then used some small round pieces of styrene stock to make the edges.


 
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Building the valve gear and drive rods and getting everything assembled properly is the hardest and most time consuming part of this project.


I started by building the crosshead and crosshead guides.


The basic shape was cut out of brass bar stock using my trusty band saw.


The holes were drilled for the piston rod and bolt to hold this piece to the main rod.




I then used a file to make a slot for the piece to ride between the crosshead guide in.



Finally, I used an abrasive wheel to cut the slot that the main drive rod would ride in.



Below are the finished pieces.


 

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It's looking really great--I love the proportions of the boiler/smokebox and cab--they're perfect. The way the cab roofline movies into the slant of the smokebox is really effective

And It's great to see the way you make the rods. I love this thread!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ok, My computer is just about dead and this is the excuse for few posts under this builder’s log. It’s gotten to the point where I have to open up the computer and "jiggle" the CPU to make it work (NO JOKE)./DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/crazy.gif


I have been spending all of my free time working on the valve gear, which is mostly cut out of brass bar stock and then filed to size. Once it passes an initial test fit, it is plated with nickel. The tow photos below show my progress to date.




I am now waiting on some 0-80 nuts and bolts from micro fasteners to start putting most of this stuff together.
P.S. Dad, don't worry about the green, it will be painted brunswick green once I get some!


Joel
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I’ve been distracted for a while with RC airplanes and a new computer (and accompanying games) but now it’s back to work on the Atlantic.
Work on the valve gear in nearly complete and today after getting everything put together I discovered that a set of rods were about ¼” too short.
Finding this out is not much fun. Your loco goes thru almost half a revolution and then stops. You wonder why until you look on the opposite side of the loco (it’s never on the side that you are closely examining) and discover that one of your rods is bent like a wishbone! At that point it’s perfectly acceptable to let out a shriek like a high school cheerleader and franticly pull at eh power leads from the transformer to shut off power. Done correctly this wire separating operation will prevent the “special” blue smoke that emanates form a model indicating that expensive repairs will be required.
Anyway, below is a photo of the valve gear so far. The next step will be to scavenge some HO gauge track to use as new, longer rods.

http://1stclass.mylargescale.com/rangerjoel/E-6 Atlantic/drive gear/valve gear 3.jpg
More posts to follow at more frequent intervals now that I have the new computer and don’t have to wiggle the CPU to make it work anymore!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Good moarning all. Yesterday consisted of making longer side rods for the loco and painting the boiler steam chest and cab the proper Brunswick green. Below is a short video of the side rods in action.




I still have some minor details to add to it like a reversing rod and linkage but these pieces should not interfere with the operation of the rest of the parts.
Joel
 

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Chugga chugga chugga /DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/mls/emoticons/tongue.gif

Looks great! Cant wait to see the finish product!
 

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A couple of "Nitpicky comments" and silly question...
Nitpick #1... I think you are working on the "Main Rod", not the "Side Rod". The Main Rod runs from the Crosshead to the Drive Pin on the main Drive Wheel. The Side Rod connects the drive pins on each wheel to each other.

EDIT: No, your are talking about the "Eccentric Rod". The rod from the Eccentric Crank to the bottom of the Link.

Nitpick #2... The pivot point for the "Link" should be in-line (along a parallel from the Valve Rod) with the connection to the "Combination lever". You have it too high. Since your Combination Lever is mere decoration, then if you draw a line off the end of the valve rod the pivot point of the Link should be on that line. The Radius Rod should move equally up and down in the Link (when shifting to reverse/forward) the same angle from the Valve Rod.

Or... extend the Combination Lever top high enough to be at the same height as the Link pivot point (this makes the connections to Combination Lever more correct also). But I think that would make the Combination Lever too long, so maybe a compromise of lenghten it some and move the pivot point down some.

But, then again, MOST people won't notice it at all, 'cuz they won't know what it is all about anyway, so since it is not a real valve gear, who cares? Sorry I brought it up.

Silly question... Why are the rollers not centered under the rear driver?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You are correct; it was the eccentric rod that I was working on.
Most of the time I don’t know the proper name of the things that I make. I simply put them on the metal spinny thing and then use some squeezers or a pounder to put them together!;)
This is one of the reasons that I have not delved deeply into live steam. When you do that, you have to start worrying about mathematics.
Joel
 

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I have several odd "representations" of steam locomotives... porcelain, wood, jade, pewter, glass, paper, etc. and some are very poor at "realism", yet for some odd reason can "imply" enough realism to be something I was willing to part with my money to get them.

"Art" is in the eye of the beholder and I subscribe the the Red Green definition of "art"... "If I can do it, it ain't art!" You and your "squeezers" and "pounders" are producing something "I" cannot do, so I suspect it is a piece of art and it looks pretty good to me.
 
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