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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Someone on another forum was asking about passenger car diaphrams, so I shared how I made mine for Pullman passenger cars. Here are some pictures and of the jigs that I made to make them. The material is a light oil cloth that I bought from Joann's fabrics, in miniature looks like the real stuff. You can probably visualize how the fabric after cut is inserted into the jig, two pieces at a time and then I used ca in the crease. After the ca has dried, the material is cut to size, and then while still in the jig, the frames are glued on one side. The procedure is repeated on the other side, and then trimmed. The top is done the same way and then glued to the frames. They are fully operational, flex both longitudinally and laterally. They are naturally springy and the carbon fiber spring helps and is also operational. The hardest part was to make the jigs. Robert Brown
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, I can't divide by 29, besides, I like my trains to fit the scale of the track. That's why they call it standard guage. Bob.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1:29?

To SD90WLMT and BIGREDONE: What would you have me do? Throw all of my 1:32 molds away and start over in 1:29. I am too old for that, at 69, I will have barely enough time to finish my present projects. I have an idea. Why don't you guys start building in 1:32?---And to answer Greg's question about the diaprahms, yes, it is CA. Vinyl paint will probably be used to protect. Robert Brown
 

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Your work is nice..keep going!!

I found a calculator that works for 1/29..works for Me..
Same boat..lots invested in 1/29...
Not lots more time than you either....

Can't be kids forever...eh!!

( I have nothing in 1/32..cept hi-way trucks n cars )
Freeway is in background so that still works well......

Good luck!!

Dirk - DMS Ry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am afraid to start a new thread to these parts, so, since we are talking about scale and molds, here are some more, by no means all. I want to say, even though I have a Bridgeport mill and also a cnc mill, all of my molds were made on either a manual mill or by hand. The picture of the tail end of the 1945 Pullman obs. car, represents a portion of the pattern that I made of the entire side of course, don't know what happened to the rest, probably used the other portion for some car. Point is that the pattern was made with a jig, router, spacers. Although the jig was kind of involved to make, you don't have to have a mill to model locomotive sides or passenger car sides. The cab and cab mold that you see was also made by hand, even though it represents about 5 evolutions to get as close as it is now. The method that I use to make a pattern can be done on a mill as you see the one that looks like Bondo, and it is. Nice part about Bondo is that if you make a mistake, you just fill it up and remachine. The one below it is the mold made from the Bondo pattern. The f7 B unit part is a side made from a different mold, but I think you get the idea. My first E8 side was also made by hand with a router, but I must admit it is easier with a mill. I am posting this to maybe reassure some that there is no mystery to making molds. I use Bondo for the patterns, and epoxy for the molds and parts, no polyester resin, too unstable and sets too fast for me. So, there you go.
 

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Now that is really impressive. I am pretty good at cutting and fitting wood and styrene (and some brass) for my models, but I haven't tried mold making yet. I am with you on scale. While I don't care what others do as far as scale, for me, I want all my models to be 1:20.3. I don't want 1:22.5 or 1:24. Now I am even building some standard gauge models in 1:20.3. To each their own, and everybody HAVE FUN!
 

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I started heading to Fn3...and also F scale....turn of the century stuff....

Some where took a right turn to modern freights...can't get enough now...it is in front of me everyday...
1/29 provided what I need to build long strings of freight trains. I still have enough to build as it is.
The Fun for me will be having friends who also run 1/29...all of us running trains together.
So we are all Happy...keep it up!!!

Dirk
 

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Very nice, again.

Have you thought about applying some of that spray-on rubber coating to your diaphrams? (you know, the stuff on TV where the guy sprays a screen door to make it waterproof) The stuff is real flexible and adheres well, or does the paint work well enough?

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The cloth that I used is an oil cloth, water proof I believe, so I don't think I would have a problem unless the super glue dissolves when wet, I don't know about that.
 

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machiningfool:

You may want to read up on Cyanoacrylate. It's Wikipedia so all the usual caveats apply. The Aquaria section appears to be pretty specific regarding its use in high moisture areas. Maybe you have to just find the right version of the glue.

Also you could to visit some of the super glue manufacturer's sites such as Loctite's Super Glue Advisor for additional brand specifics.
 
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