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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Lady Ann kit that I am working on and need advice on painting the parts.  I don't have a lot of experience painting other than with shaker cans so any hints would be appreciated. :confused:   I know that cleanliness is the rule, but what about surface prep.  I have heard about etching the surface, what do I use for this?  Should I plan on baking the paint on?


Thanks guys, and Happy New Year!


Joel
 

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Hi Joel:  I have had good success painting brass by first washing it in soap and water to get the major dirt and crud off.  Then soak in clean white vinegar.  Prime the brass using an etching primer.  I get etching primer at Autozone, but probably can get it at any auto parts store.  I found that 2 light coats of primer works best, then top coat of your choice.


 


Baking it?  Have not tryed, might help in the curing process of the paint.  Otherwise you need to wait fully a week for the paint to cure and harden.


 


This is the best combo I found so far


 


Bob
 

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Joel,

Dependent on the type of object you are painting, etching primer can hide too much detail. When I need as much detail shown on a painted piece as possible (like a tender with very fine rivits) I prep the surface like bob said and then spray very light coats of a high grade enamel paint, letting it cure on a furnace after the initial dry period. You could bake the parts, but this can make some nasty fumes and you could "cook" the part if not careful.

On the coal fired ruby, I simply masked off the boiler, cleaned it up with a scotch brite pad and some high strength degreaser (available at pep boys or the like as brake caliper cleaner). dry the part off real good, and you get a nice clean paint job.  As soon as I can get into my 1st class space, I will post up a photo or three. 


This paint style is similar to what aster uses, a very thin coat of paint, and holds up well if not abused.


 


Edit:
Found a photo!
 

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Joel,


check with Eric. He uses an etching primer and rattle cans.


Regards


 
 

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Hey Joel:  One thing I forgot to mention is that when the part comes out of the vinegar bath you need to dry it off and coat with primer or paint ASAP.  Brass can tarnish fast and you don't need that.


 


Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks a lot guys,  so far I have had pretty good luck with the steel parts, just using Krylon automotive primer and flat black paint.  Things got 'interesting' when I went to do the cylinders.  I couldn't get anything to stick well at all.  I will look into a good etch primer and preceed this with the vineger bath.  The challenge will be to keep this etching primer off any machined surfaces. 


I think on the Lady Ann, the cylinders are the only thing where I will be painting around sensitive surfaces. 


Of course, if it will keep things stuck to the steel parts better, maybe I should use the etch primer there as well....  comments?


Joel
 

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I just use regular Krylon primer. I wanted to use etching primer, but the local auto parts store guy looked at me as if I was speaking Chinese. Opted instead for regular Krylon grey primer, and have yet to have a single issue with it after 10+ years of operation. I wash the parts first with soap and water, then brush them with diluted muratic acid, rinse again with water, dry, and immediately paint. I try to give myself enough time to prime and paint in one sitting--which is an hour at the most between coats. Otherwise, wait at least 24 hours between coats or the paint will craze. Fortunately, if it does craze, just wipe it off and start over.

Later,

K
 
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