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I HAVE TROIED TO USE THE NEW METHOD AND HAVE FAILED. I WILL PUT THE PICS THAT HARLAN CHINN SENT ME IN FLICKER AND THEN POST. I COULD NOT GET THE NEW SYSTEM TO LET ME POST ALL THE PICS. SORRY . MAYBE YOU CANNOT TEACH OLD DOGS NEW TRICKS.
 

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Sharon's layout was engineered and built with the assistance of her boyfriend a few years ago. The rail support pipes vary in length and have tines that spaly outwardly below grade and are placed deep into the hardpan. With threaded fittings, minute adjustments can be made to adjust for settlement, but to date none has been needed. Every switch and turn out is of course a custom fabrication and is so precise and robust that reliability isn't an issue.
The track railwork consists of mere ribbons of aluminum guaged with stainless steel tube and hex screws that makes a grand loop down a picket fence line, around past the back side of the home, around down the fence line of a neighbor and around past the carport. Because there is no roadbed the track appears to float above the garden and plants can grow through the track. Interesting thing about this track, it sounds like your train is steel rollercoaster as the metal on metal sound is quite amplified above the sound of the chuffing locomotive .

We've been steaming there for the last four years and each season the garden seems to envelope the layout
 

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I think many of us would like to see more of the track details such as switches... Are there any cross overs, yard, sidings, etc. Would be great to have some photos of the various track sections of given locations relative to switches, yard, etc.
So, no possibility of wear on the "rail heads" that might require a section to be replaced? How about the weather effects of expansion?
While I admire the engineering and uniqueness; that is really riding a "tight rope" if there is a derailment.
 

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This method of track construction reminds me of the late Bob Paule's multi-gauge system he used to operate gauge 1 through 4 3/4" gauges, I believe.
 

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The layout has stub switches, a passing siding and multiple steam up bays

Everyone was concerned at first about the engines floating in air in case of derailment. But no main problems that I am aware of
and I have more confidence here than track laid on wood supports or on the ground.

The track is continuous so Mikados etc can get up to speed with smooth runs

jim
 
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